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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1997 | GEOFF BOUCHER
Coroner's officials are asking the public's help in contacting the family of a 28-year-old man who was fatally injured on Jan. 18 when he was hit by a cab while crossing Katella Avenue in Stanton. Fidel Zamora Gonzales, who was carrying no identification, died a day after the accident at Columbia West Anaheim Hospital and was identified with fingerprint records, according to Orange County Sheriff's Lt. Ron Wilkerson.
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WORLD
January 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A speeding motorist who killed a teenage cyclist sued the boy's parents over damage to his luxury car. Enaitz Iriondo, 17, died instantly in August 2004 when businessman Tomas Delgado's Audi A8 hit him at about 100 mph near Haro, an Interior Ministry traffic report said. The speed limit was 56. It was dark, and Iriondo was not wearing reflective clothing or a helmet, so a court found both parties at fault. Delgado, whose insurance paid Iriondo's parents $48,500 in compensation, filed a suit in 2006 to recover $29,400 in damages and car rental costs, the newspaper El Pais said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1990 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL and PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Charges were dropped Friday against a Santa Paula man accused of shooting his next-door neighbor to death after prosecutors said they had insufficient evidence to charge the man with a crime. Police said witnesses from the two families gave such conflicting versions of the shooting Monday that authorities have had difficulty sorting out what actually happened. Ventura County Municipal Judge Thomas J. Hutchins ordered Delfino E. Lopez, 43, released from jail after Deputy Dist. Atty. James D.
OPINION
July 30, 2006
I was pleased to see your coverage of the recommendations of the California Commission on the Fair Administration of Justice that the Legislature require the electronic taping of felony interrogations to address the problem of erroneous criminal convictions due to false confessions (July 26). I am proposing legislation that would do just this. As the commission has indicated, false confessions are the second leading cause of wrongful convictions. My measure would help California stem the tide of innocent people serving time for crimes they did not commit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2000
Re "Slain Officer's Family Is Still Awaiting Justice," Dec. 16 column by Jerry Hicks: The victim's family rightly feels anger that it takes so long for the sentence to be carried out. However, the anger shouldn't be directed at the killer, his attorney or the courts. The appeals, after all, are to assure that no innocent person is ever executed. Even the most hidebound prosecutor would agree with that. Government actions, of which capital punishment is surely one, are limited by our Constitution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1992
In his column, "Words From Families Don't Belong in Death Sentences" (July 5), Dana Parsons makes an emotional pitch against the current law of the land regarding first-degree murder with special circumstances. While he fails to point out the guidelines recently set up by the high court (family testimony only in cases where it is established in the trial that the accused had prior knowledge of a victim's family), his fear is that more harsh sentences would be meted out to those who murder people with eloquent family members.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
She hesitated Thursday before walking out of the Orange County Superior courthouse, where she has spent the past four weeks bearing witness as the man who killed her son stood trial. But the tormenting testimony was in some ways more comforting than what was waiting for her. "I don't want to go home," Dao Huynh said, breaking into tears. "I don't want to go home and look at his empty room."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1999
Regarding April 3 story "Fatal Shooting by Officer Is Investigated," it should be mentioned that no other local, state or federal agency has fully investigated this case other than the internal affairs unit of the Santa Ana Police Department. That body is hardly considered to be fair and impartial, given the fact it has the task of investigating abuse and misconduct committed by officers who are co-workers, friends and associates of those doing the investigating. Despite efforts to discredit Marc Creighton Block [attorney for the victim's family]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1997 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was inside a small courtroom in Edmonton, Alberta, in 1988 that Lola Stapley first laid eyes on Charles Ng, the man accused of killing her youngest son, Scott, and a dozen other people three years earlier. She sat in the front row with her husband, Dwight, and looked hard into Ng's eyes from the moment he entered court for an extradition hearing. She remained fixated on him until he was led out hours later.
OPINION
November 20, 2005
Patt Morrison's commentary on the death penalty (Opinion, Nov. 17) can be summed up as follows: If you are an antiwar, pro-choice, pro-environment Californian, you should also be anti-death penalty. How about presenting an argument as to why it's in the state's interest to keep alive the murderous monsters on death row? She hints at her line of reasoning at the end, referring to the death penalty as "time-consuming and absurdly expensive." We've had enough red-blue polarization. Issues like the death penalty deserve more than a two-color analysis.
OPINION
November 20, 2005
Patt Morrison's commentary on the death penalty (Opinion, Nov. 17) can be summed up as follows: If you are an antiwar, pro-choice, pro-environment Californian, you should also be anti-death penalty. How about presenting an argument as to why it's in the state's interest to keep alive the murderous monsters on death row? She hints at her line of reasoning at the end, referring to the death penalty as "time-consuming and absurdly expensive." We've had enough red-blue polarization. Issues like the death penalty deserve more than a two-color analysis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2002 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A third fund has been established for the family of Yaakov Aminov, one of the victims of the July 4 shootings at the El Al Israel Airlines ticket counter at Los Angeles International Airport. Aminov's wife, Anat, is expecting their sixth child. Aminov, of Valley Village, also was the father of three children from a previous marriage. The five youngest children range in age from 1 to 9.
OPINION
January 29, 2002
With his denial of clemency for Stephen Wayne Anderson, Gov. Gray Davis exsanguinates an already anemic political and moral record (Jan. 27). Oblivious to the pleas of the victim's family to spare Anderson's life, Davis also ignores more than 60% of polled Californians who opt for life without the possibility of parole over death. He becomes an accessory and accomplice to premeditated and state-sanctioned murder. He implicates us all. Kay Bandell Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2000
Re "Slain Officer's Family Is Still Awaiting Justice," Dec. 16 column by Jerry Hicks: The victim's family rightly feels anger that it takes so long for the sentence to be carried out. However, the anger shouldn't be directed at the killer, his attorney or the courts. The appeals, after all, are to assure that no innocent person is ever executed. Even the most hidebound prosecutor would agree with that. Government actions, of which capital punishment is surely one, are limited by our Constitution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1999
Regarding April 3 story "Fatal Shooting by Officer Is Investigated," it should be mentioned that no other local, state or federal agency has fully investigated this case other than the internal affairs unit of the Santa Ana Police Department. That body is hardly considered to be fair and impartial, given the fact it has the task of investigating abuse and misconduct committed by officers who are co-workers, friends and associates of those doing the investigating. Despite efforts to discredit Marc Creighton Block [attorney for the victim's family]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1998 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Moved by the horror that has swept this city, hundreds of residents and businesses are raising money for the family of Juan Delgado, the 12-year-old boy who was killed, dismembered and encased in concrete. As of Friday, more than $1,600 had been raised for the Juan Delgado Memorial Fund, set up by police at California State Bank in La Habra.
WORLD
January 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A speeding motorist who killed a teenage cyclist sued the boy's parents over damage to his luxury car. Enaitz Iriondo, 17, died instantly in August 2004 when businessman Tomas Delgado's Audi A8 hit him at about 100 mph near Haro, an Interior Ministry traffic report said. The speed limit was 56. It was dark, and Iriondo was not wearing reflective clothing or a helmet, so a court found both parties at fault. Delgado, whose insurance paid Iriondo's parents $48,500 in compensation, filed a suit in 2006 to recover $29,400 in damages and car rental costs, the newspaper El Pais said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1997
As the Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to offer a $25,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for last weekend's triple murder in a quiet Mid-City neighborhood, the family of one of the victims made a public plea for financial help with funeral expenses. "This is horrendous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1997
As the Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to offer a $25,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for last weekend's triple murder in a quiet Mid-City neighborhood, the family of one of the victims made a public plea for financial help with funeral expenses. "This is horrendous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1997 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was inside a small courtroom in Edmonton, Alberta, in 1988 that Lola Stapley first laid eyes on Charles Ng, the man accused of killing her youngest son, Scott, and a dozen other people three years earlier. She sat in the front row with her husband, Dwight, and looked hard into Ng's eyes from the moment he entered court for an extradition hearing. She remained fixated on him until he was led out hours later.
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