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Victims Compensation

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NATIONAL
September 10, 2003 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge cleared the way Tuesday for Sept. 11 lawsuits against the aviation industry and the owner of the World Trade Center, ruling they should have anticipated the possibility that terrorists could hijack planes and crash them into buildings. The ruling provided a choice for victims and their families, who have to decide by Dec. 22 whether to apply for payment from a federal compensation fund or take legal action -- without a guarantee they will receive any money in the end.
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NATIONAL
September 10, 2003 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge cleared the way Tuesday for Sept. 11 lawsuits against the aviation industry and the owner of the World Trade Center, ruling they should have anticipated the possibility that terrorists could hijack planes and crash them into buildings. The ruling provided a choice for victims and their families, who have to decide by Dec. 22 whether to apply for payment from a federal compensation fund or take legal action -- without a guarantee they will receive any money in the end.
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NEWS
April 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Former hostages and the families of victims of alleged state-sponsored terrorism appealed Thursday to Congress for help in collecting multimillion-dollar judgments they have been awarded. "The Clinton administration has continued to object to every practical proposal we have made," said Terry Anderson, who won a $341-million federal court award against Iran last month.
OPINION
August 18, 2002 | RICHARD M. MOSK, Richard M. Mosk is an associate justice of the California Court of Appeal and, formerly, a judge of the Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal, established as a part of the 1981 Iran-U.S. hostage agreement.
Congress several years ago agreed to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to a small group of Americans who were injured or killed at the hands of foreign terrorists. The payments were the product of this perverted logic: that compensating the victims would punish the terrorists--even if American taxpayers made the payments. Now Congress is at it again, proposing to provide a few politically well-connected victims of terrorism--none of whom are related to the Sept.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | STEFAN FATSIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For legions of Americans who are sick and dying from exposure to asbestos on the job, compensation might come years or even generations after they are dead. At least 80,000 lawsuits against asbestos companies clog 500 state and federal courts. A multibillion-dollar trust fund established by No. 1 producer Manville Corp. to pay victims is temporarily broke. Exasperated judges are lumping together thousands of cases and urging settlements. Claims filed in the early 1980s are scheduled for trial in the late 1990s.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1990 | From Associated Press
A plan was unveiled today to restructure the Manville trust set up to compensate victims of asbestos by slashing attorneys' fees and paying victims according to the severity of their disease. The long-awaited plan is designed to speed payments to tens of thousands of workers nationwide who contracted cancer and other diseases inhaling fibers from Manville-made asbestos. Thousands have died before being compensated. The restructuring plan, submitted today to U.S. District Judge Jack B.
OPINION
August 18, 2002 | RICHARD M. MOSK, Richard M. Mosk is an associate justice of the California Court of Appeal and, formerly, a judge of the Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal, established as a part of the 1981 Iran-U.S. hostage agreement.
Congress several years ago agreed to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to a small group of Americans who were injured or killed at the hands of foreign terrorists. The payments were the product of this perverted logic: that compensating the victims would punish the terrorists--even if American taxpayers made the payments. Now Congress is at it again, proposing to provide a few politically well-connected victims of terrorism--none of whom are related to the Sept.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
In a strong bipartisan signal, House Armed Services Committee members warned the Reagan Administration on Thursday that it faces stiff obstacles in selling Congress on the idea of compensating families of the victims of last month's downing of an Iranian airliner.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1998 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traditional alliances are taking a beating in the smoking wars. Filial piety is too. Consider the latest assault on Big Tobacco--a multibillion-dollar suit against cigarette makers by the Manville Personal Injury Settlement Trust. The trust, which was spawned by the 1982 bankruptcy of asbestos giant Johns Manville Corp., compensates workers for the asbestos-related diseases that drove Manville to seek bankruptcy protection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1996 | SONDRA THIEDERMAN, Sondra Thiederman is a writer in San Diego with 15 years experience as a trainer on the topic of cultural diversity
Corporate America is creating victims among its employees. Certainly, there have been and continue to be gross injustices--worker exploitation, sexual harassment, racial discrimination. But it seems a new twist for corporations to systematically label an entire class of people as victims. A prime example of this trend is Texaco's move to provide an across-the-board 10% raise to all salaried African Americans in its employ, as a part of the settlement of a discrimination lawsuit.
NEWS
December 21, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress approved a bill Thursday to cut taxes for terrorism victims--one of its final actions before adjourning for the year--but failed to finish legislation meant to help the insurance industry handle a flood of claims in the event of future catastrophes. The tax bill would ensure that families of those who died in the Sept. 11 attacks, the recent anthrax attacks and the 1995 bombing in Oklahoma City receive refunds of at least $10,000 each. President Bush is expected to sign the measure.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Former hostages and the families of victims of alleged state-sponsored terrorism appealed Thursday to Congress for help in collecting multimillion-dollar judgments they have been awarded. "The Clinton administration has continued to object to every practical proposal we have made," said Terry Anderson, who won a $341-million federal court award against Iran last month.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1998 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traditional alliances are taking a beating in the smoking wars. Filial piety is too. Consider the latest assault on Big Tobacco--a multibillion-dollar suit against cigarette makers by the Manville Personal Injury Settlement Trust. The trust, which was spawned by the 1982 bankruptcy of asbestos giant Johns Manville Corp., compensates workers for the asbestos-related diseases that drove Manville to seek bankruptcy protection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1996 | SONDRA THIEDERMAN, Sondra Thiederman is a writer in San Diego with 15 years experience as a trainer on the topic of cultural diversity
Corporate America is creating victims among its employees. Certainly, there have been and continue to be gross injustices--worker exploitation, sexual harassment, racial discrimination. But it seems a new twist for corporations to systematically label an entire class of people as victims. A prime example of this trend is Texaco's move to provide an across-the-board 10% raise to all salaried African Americans in its employ, as a part of the settlement of a discrimination lawsuit.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1990 | From Associated Press
A plan was unveiled today to restructure the Manville trust set up to compensate victims of asbestos by slashing attorneys' fees and paying victims according to the severity of their disease. The long-awaited plan is designed to speed payments to tens of thousands of workers nationwide who contracted cancer and other diseases inhaling fibers from Manville-made asbestos. Thousands have died before being compensated. The restructuring plan, submitted today to U.S. District Judge Jack B.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | STEFAN FATSIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For legions of Americans who are sick and dying from exposure to asbestos on the job, compensation might come years or even generations after they are dead. At least 80,000 lawsuits against asbestos companies clog 500 state and federal courts. A multibillion-dollar trust fund established by No. 1 producer Manville Corp. to pay victims is temporarily broke. Exasperated judges are lumping together thousands of cases and urging settlements. Claims filed in the early 1980s are scheduled for trial in the late 1990s.
NEWS
December 21, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress approved a bill Thursday to cut taxes for terrorism victims--one of its final actions before adjourning for the year--but failed to finish legislation meant to help the insurance industry handle a flood of claims in the event of future catastrophes. The tax bill would ensure that families of those who died in the Sept. 11 attacks, the recent anthrax attacks and the 1995 bombing in Oklahoma City receive refunds of at least $10,000 each. President Bush is expected to sign the measure.
NATIONAL
May 9, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge in Manhattan upheld the legality of the Victims' Compensation Fund that Congress established after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, dismissing lawsuits by some victims' families who challenged it as arbitrary and unconstitutional. U.S.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
In a strong bipartisan signal, House Armed Services Committee members warned the Reagan Administration on Thursday that it faces stiff obstacles in selling Congress on the idea of compensating families of the victims of last month's downing of an Iranian airliner.
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