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Victor A Kaufman

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BUSINESS
February 11, 1992 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With MGM/Pathe Communications and Orion Pictures facing uncertain futures, a group of influential Hollywood executives on Monday announced the creation of a new film distribution company. Savoy Pictures Entertainment Inc., formed with $100 million in start-up funds and the support of such financial powerhouses as New York investment banker Allen & Co., is the brainchild of former Columbia Pictures executives Victor A. Kaufman and Lewis J. Korman.
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BUSINESS
May 15, 1995 | JAMES BATES Victor A. Kaufman..BD: TIMES STAFF WRITER
Savoy Pictures Entertainment Chief Executive Victor A. Kaufman is recuperating at home in New York following angioplasty surgery, the movie distributor has confirmed. Savoy President Lewis J. Korman said Friday that Kaufman, 52, underwent the procedure May 6 after he had chest pains. He was hospitalized until last Tuesday. In angioplasty surgery, a balloon-like device is threaded through clogged arteries to clear them. Korman said Kaufman is recovering well and has been working from home.
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BUSINESS
May 15, 1995 | JAMES BATES Victor A. Kaufman..BD: TIMES STAFF WRITER
Savoy Pictures Entertainment Chief Executive Victor A. Kaufman is recuperating at home in New York following angioplasty surgery, the movie distributor has confirmed. Savoy President Lewis J. Korman said Friday that Kaufman, 52, underwent the procedure May 6 after he had chest pains. He was hospitalized until last Tuesday. In angioplasty surgery, a balloon-like device is threaded through clogged arteries to clear them. Korman said Kaufman is recovering well and has been working from home.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1992 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With MGM/Pathe Communications and Orion Pictures facing uncertain futures, a group of influential Hollywood executives on Monday announced the creation of a new film distribution company. Savoy Pictures Entertainment Inc., formed with $100 million in start-up funds and the support of such financial powerhouses as New York investment banker Allen & Co., is the brainchild of former Columbia Pictures executives Victor A. Kaufman and Lewis J. Korman.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Victor A. Kaufman, the Tri-Star Pictures chairman who has been chosen to run all of Coca-Cola's entertainment holdings when a merger takes place later this year, won't arrive in town until Sept. 14 to survey his new kingdom, but Hollywood is already placing wagers on who will survive the corporate shuffle. The most visible--and some say vulnerable--executive at Coca-Cola's wholly owned Columbia Pictures is David Puttnam, the studio's outspoken chairman and chief executive.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
British film director John Boorman doesn't claim to know much about corporate accounting. But he's hopping mad about what he says is Columbia Pictures Entertainment's incorrect assertion that his "Hope and Glory," nominated for an Oscar as best picture, contributed to the studio's anticipated $105-million after-tax loss for the 2 1/2 months ended Feb. 29. In disclosing the expected loss earlier this week, Columbia President and Chief Executive Victor A.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
In a dramatic move that will create a $2-billion entertainment company, Coca-Cola is expected to announce today that it will combine all its entertainment holdings--including Columbia Pictures, Coca-Cola Television and a one-third stake in Tri-Star Pictures--in one company under Tri-Star Chairman Victor A. Kaufman.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
Sony's buyout of Columbia Pictures will set in motion yet another management shuffle at the studio, which has survived four regimes in 10 years. When the dust finally settles, Columbia studio chief Dawn Steel could be one of the casualties. Steel, who stands to make $7 million from the studio sale, is flying to New York next week for the premiere of the Jane Fonda film "Old Gringo."
BUSINESS
October 30, 1988 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
At 52, Sanford Lieberson is no Hollywood neophyte. The London-based film maker had a brief stint as head of 20th Century Fox Film's movie production in 1979, and he knows projects are imperiled when studios change hands. Yet Lieberson was stung by his experience this year with Columbia Pictures, when new managers inherited his $7-million "Stars & Bars." For the film's opening, Columbia bought a 5-inch by 5-inch ad in the New York Times instead of the full page typically bought by a major studio.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Early in the century, an immigrant's son named Marcus Loew built one of the nation's first movie theater chains. Eventually, he acquired some of the fledgling film studios that supplied the movies. Nearly seven decades later, the story has come full circle. Tri-Star Pictures, an upstart film producer intent on securing its place among the major studios, six months ago purchased the venerable Loews Theaters.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
Sony's buyout of Columbia Pictures will set in motion yet another management shuffle at the studio, which has survived four regimes in 10 years. When the dust finally settles, Columbia studio chief Dawn Steel could be one of the casualties. Steel, who stands to make $7 million from the studio sale, is flying to New York next week for the premiere of the Jane Fonda film "Old Gringo."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
Upstairs, on the 11th floor of 711 Fifth Ave., is the corporate headquarters of Columbia Pictures Entertainment. It is a problem child of the movie industry, plagued by films that don't sell ("Slaves of New York," "Chances Are," "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen," "True Believer"), and managers who don't stick (David Puttnam, Francis "Fay" Vincent, Guy McElwaine, Frank Price, Alan Hirschfield, David Begelman). Downstairs, on the 9th floor, are the offices of Big Investor Herbert A. Allen, a one-time Columbia chairman who has held stock in the studio since 1973.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1988 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
At 52, Sanford Lieberson is no Hollywood neophyte. The London-based film maker had a brief stint as head of 20th Century Fox Film's movie production in 1979, and he knows projects are imperiled when studios change hands. Yet Lieberson was stung by his experience this year with Columbia Pictures, when new managers inherited his $7-million "Stars & Bars." For the film's opening, Columbia bought a 5-inch by 5-inch ad in the New York Times instead of the full page typically bought by a major studio.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
British film director John Boorman doesn't claim to know much about corporate accounting. But he's hopping mad about what he says is Columbia Pictures Entertainment's incorrect assertion that his "Hope and Glory," nominated for an Oscar as best picture, contributed to the studio's anticipated $105-million after-tax loss for the 2 1/2 months ended Feb. 29. In disclosing the expected loss earlier this week, Columbia President and Chief Executive Victor A.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1987 | JACK MATHEWS
The most interesting detail to come out of the recent announcement that Coca-Cola plans to merge its Tri-Star and Columbia studios and put current Tri-Star Chairman Victor Kaufman in charge was that Columbia Pictures Chairman David Puttnam learned about it from his morning newspaper. When your superiors don't mind if your paperboy knows the fate of your company before you do, you have to figure that you are not the most coveted member of the team.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Victor A. Kaufman, the Tri-Star Pictures chairman who has been chosen to run all of Coca-Cola's entertainment holdings when a merger takes place later this year, won't arrive in town until Sept. 14 to survey his new kingdom, but Hollywood is already placing wagers on who will survive the corporate shuffle. The most visible--and some say vulnerable--executive at Coca-Cola's wholly owned Columbia Pictures is David Puttnam, the studio's outspoken chairman and chief executive.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
Upstairs, on the 11th floor of 711 Fifth Ave., is the corporate headquarters of Columbia Pictures Entertainment. It is a problem child of the movie industry, plagued by films that don't sell ("Slaves of New York," "Chances Are," "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen," "True Believer"), and managers who don't stick (David Puttnam, Francis "Fay" Vincent, Guy McElwaine, Frank Price, Alan Hirschfield, David Begelman). Downstairs, on the 9th floor, are the offices of Big Investor Herbert A. Allen, a one-time Columbia chairman who has held stock in the studio since 1973.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1987 | JACK MATHEWS
The most interesting detail to come out of the recent announcement that Coca-Cola plans to merge its Tri-Star and Columbia studios and put current Tri-Star Chairman Victor Kaufman in charge was that Columbia Pictures Chairman David Puttnam learned about it from his morning newspaper. When your superiors don't mind if your paperboy knows the fate of your company before you do, you have to figure that you are not the most coveted member of the team.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
In a dramatic move that will create a $2-billion entertainment company, Coca-Cola is expected to announce today that it will combine all its entertainment holdings--including Columbia Pictures, Coca-Cola Television and a one-third stake in Tri-Star Pictures--in one company under Tri-Star Chairman Victor A. Kaufman.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Early in the century, an immigrant's son named Marcus Loew built one of the nation's first movie theater chains. Eventually, he acquired some of the fledgling film studios that supplied the movies. Nearly seven decades later, the story has come full circle. Tri-Star Pictures, an upstart film producer intent on securing its place among the major studios, six months ago purchased the venerable Loews Theaters.
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