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Victor Alhadeff

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BUSINESS
February 25, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Victor C. Alhadeff, founder and chairman of Egghead Discount Software, said Friday that he has turned over his day-to-day operational duties to a company director who was a key adviser in getting the concern started. Named Egghead's new president and chief executive was Stuart M. Sloan, one of the initial investors in the Issaquah, Wash.-based software retailer. As part of its management overhaul, the company also hired two other senior executives for newly created positions.
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BUSINESS
February 25, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Victor C. Alhadeff, founder and chairman of Egghead Discount Software, said Friday that he has turned over his day-to-day operational duties to a company director who was a key adviser in getting the concern started. Named Egghead's new president and chief executive was Stuart M. Sloan, one of the initial investors in the Issaquah, Wash.-based software retailer. As part of its management overhaul, the company also hired two other senior executives for newly created positions.
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BUSINESS
January 22, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Personal computer software once baffled the people who sell to the masses. After all, how do you get the average consumer excited about a piece of plastic that comes with an obtuse, 2-inch-thick operating manual? And how do you even describe something as bizarre as a platter encoded with instructions that can direct anything from a sophisticated financial spreadsheet to the antics of a Pac Man?
BUSINESS
January 22, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Personal computer software once baffled the people who sell to the masses. After all, how do you get the average consumer excited about a piece of plastic that comes with an obtuse, 2-inch-thick operating manual? And how do you even describe something as bizarre as a platter encoded with instructions that can direct anything from a sophisticated financial spreadsheet to the antics of a Pac Man?
BUSINESS
February 6, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Briazz Inc. filed Monday for an initial public offering of stock estimated to raise as much as $23 million to expand its chain of 39 sandwich shops. But the deal, expected to be offered through the "OpenIPO" auction system of online investment bank W.R. Hambrecht, comes with a strong warning about risk.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Egghead Discount Software, accused last month of stock fraud by disgruntled shareholders, said Thursday that the Securities and Exchange Commission has opened an investigation into allegations raised by the shareholders' suit. Matthew J. Griffin, executive vice president of the software retailing chain, said Egghead officials are cooperating with the SEC and have been told that the investigation should not be considered an indication of wrongdoing.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Make no mistake about it: Silicon Valley is very different from the rest of the world. You need only to visit Fry's Electronics here in the heart of this high-tech mecca to confirm it. Known to the locals as simply Fry's, the store offers an array of consumer electronics--from boom boxes to big screen televisions--that rival the best of its competitors.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
Because of an editing error, the first part of this story was inadvertently omitted from Sunday's Orange County Edition of The Times. The story is reprinted in its entirety. Seven-year-old Ryan Ballas, a student at E. R. Taylor elementary school, patiently explained the "game" on his Apple II to a hopelessly dense visitor. "See, you're supposed to pick out all the words with a 'U' in the middle," the second-grader said. "You let the other words drop into the trash can. Here, I'll show you."
BUSINESS
October 23, 1988
Apple Computer co-founder Steven P. Jobs unveiled this month the first computer from his new company, Next Inc. The $6,500 machine, which features a vast memory, stereo-quality sound and a high-resolution screen, is exclusively for the higher education market. For packaging several new wrinkles in technology in a single machine, the Next computer won raves from some analysts. But will the company be a commercial success? Will the computer sell?
BUSINESS
April 23, 2002 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as the restaurant industry is showing its slowest growth in a decade and rivals are scaling back expansion plans, Cheesecake Factory Inc. has plans to grow more aggressively than ever. The Calabasas Hills-based chain's strategy of serving huge portions, offering variety and opening restaurants in affluent neighborhoods will no doubt be tested in the midst of a sluggish economy and declines in eating out.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI and GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fry's Electronics made George Margolin an offer he couldn't refuse. An inventor and president of a local computer club, Margolin waited in line for 90 minutes to spend several hundred dollars to buy a computer chip during the computer and electronics "super-store's" recent grand opening sale. "Their prices were so low, I could pay more wholesale for that chip," said Margolin of Newport Beach.
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