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Victor Bout

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NATIONAL
April 27, 2005 | Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writer
The Treasury Department imposed broad financial sanctions Tuesday against the international arms network of Russian air transporter Victor Bout, freezing the assets of 30 companies and four individuals, including an American named as Bout's chief financial officer. The move is aimed at crippling a global air empire accused of violating weapons embargoes in African civil wars for more than a decade. In addition, U.S.
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WORLD
October 14, 2010 | By Simon Roughneen, Los Angeles Times
A Thai court has agreed this week to hear an appeal by suspected arms trafficker Victor Bout, a move likely to frustrate, at least temporarily, U.S. efforts to extradite him on four terrorism-related counts. The former Russian military officer earned international notoriety in the post-Cold War era for allegedly arming a rogues' gallery of terrorist groups, militias and governments, many of which were under a United Nations weapons embargo. If the court proceeds with the appeal it accepted Wednesday, Bout could remain in a Thai prison beyond the Nov. 20 U.S. extradition deadline, a date determined after an earlier court decision.
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NEWS
May 19, 2002 | By Times Staff Writers
The files on Victor Bout in government agencies around the world brim with accounts of how he hunted game with rebel leaders, threw beer parties on jungle landing strips and consorted with dictators to build his business empire. For a decade, his armada of aircraft has hauled almost anything for a price: fish, coffee, relief supplies, flowers, and heads of state and their wives. International authorities say the 35-year-old Russian also operates the world's largest private weapons transport network, carrying military goods as small as Kalashnikov assault rifle rounds and as large as helicopter gunships.
WORLD
October 7, 2010 | By Simon Roughneen and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
The last chance for an alleged arms smuggler dubbed the "Merchant of Death" to avoid extradition from Thailand to the United States on terrorism charges appears to lie with Thailand's prime minister, who faces a tough decision: offend the United States or offend Russia. The difficult diplomatic choice for Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva follows a ruling Tuesday by a Thai court clearing a legal obstacle that had barred the extradition. Victor Bout, a former Russian air force officer, is suspected of supplying weapons to various armies and terrorist groups in the Middle East, South America and Africa.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man who identified himself as the brother of a Russian businessman accused of transporting arms for Al Qaeda terrorists said Wednesday that his sibling was a common air carrier, not an arms dealer, who had no idea what his cargo was. Sergei Bout, 41, angrily dismissed allegations against his 35-year-old brother, Victor. In a phone interview with The Times, he did not divulge his brother's whereabouts, but said he is "now living quite legally, residing in one country."
WORLD
October 14, 2010 | By Simon Roughneen, Los Angeles Times
A Thai court has agreed this week to hear an appeal by suspected arms trafficker Victor Bout, a move likely to frustrate, at least temporarily, U.S. efforts to extradite him on four terrorism-related counts. The former Russian military officer earned international notoriety in the post-Cold War era for allegedly arming a rogues' gallery of terrorist groups, militias and governments, many of which were under a United Nations weapons embargo. If the court proceeds with the appeal it accepted Wednesday, Bout could remain in a Thai prison beyond the Nov. 20 U.S. extradition deadline, a date determined after an earlier court decision.
WORLD
May 19, 2002 | --From Times Staff Reports
Victor Bout is fluent in five languages and is described by intimates as a tough but charming man and a hard bargainer. Bout's business dealings have enabled him to buy expensive cars and residences in Moscow, on the Belgian coast and in South Africa and the emirate of Sharjah. He has left several countries one step ahead of official inquiries into his businesses and has been accused by United Nations and U.S. officials of supplying weapons to regimes around the world.
OPINION
July 23, 2002 | WILLIAM F. WECHSLER and LEE S. WOLOSKY
Most Americans would be shocked to learn that one of the Taliban's favorite arms smugglers is now living freely and openly in a country that is supposed to be an ally in the U.S. war against terrorism--and that the Bush administration has done nothing about it. Another story of double-dealing by Saudi Arabia or divided loyalties in Pakistan? No, this problem is in Russia.
WORLD
December 18, 2004 | Stephen Braun and Judy Pasternak, Times Staff Writers
The State Department circulated a list of nine air companies linked to reputed arms trafficker Victor Bout in June, warning diplomatic posts against hiring the firms. But the Defense Department, which oversees most of the massive military contracts in Iraq, made no similar effort to warn its agencies, officials said Friday. Planes flown by four firms suspected of ties to the Russian businessman's aviation network landed in Baghdad at least 195 times over the last year, government documents show.
SPORTS
October 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
Undefeated Virgil Hill, recovered from a bout with hyperglycemia, will make the seventh defense of his World Boxing Assn. light heavyweight title Tuesday night. Hill (25-0) will meet James Kinchen (44-6-2) in a scheduled 12-round bout at the Bismarck Civic Center. The fight was to have been held in August but was postponed when the champion was determined to have hyperglycemia--abnormally high amounts of sugar in the blood--that Hill blamed on a poor diet and stress.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2006 | Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writer
A sporting goods store in a small northern Pennsylvania town is the unlikely focus of a federal investigation into the suspected reemergence of the global arms transport network controlled by Russian businessman Victor Bout. Federal officials said this week that a recent search of the store near Wilkes-Barre, Pa., sought to learn whether a Bulgarian firm in Bout's business empire was being used to purchase restricted paramilitary items for a company tied to Russia's intelligence agency.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2005 | Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writer
The Treasury Department imposed broad financial sanctions Tuesday against the international arms network of Russian air transporter Victor Bout, freezing the assets of 30 companies and four individuals, including an American named as Bout's chief financial officer. The move is aimed at crippling a global air empire accused of violating weapons embargoes in African civil wars for more than a decade. In addition, U.S.
WORLD
December 18, 2004 | Stephen Braun and Judy Pasternak, Times Staff Writers
The State Department circulated a list of nine air companies linked to reputed arms trafficker Victor Bout in June, warning diplomatic posts against hiring the firms. But the Defense Department, which oversees most of the massive military contracts in Iraq, made no similar effort to warn its agencies, officials said Friday. Planes flown by four firms suspected of ties to the Russian businessman's aviation network landed in Baghdad at least 195 times over the last year, government documents show.
OPINION
July 23, 2002 | WILLIAM F. WECHSLER and LEE S. WOLOSKY
Most Americans would be shocked to learn that one of the Taliban's favorite arms smugglers is now living freely and openly in a country that is supposed to be an ally in the U.S. war against terrorism--and that the Bush administration has done nothing about it. Another story of double-dealing by Saudi Arabia or divided loyalties in Pakistan? No, this problem is in Russia.
WORLD
May 19, 2002 | --From Times Staff Reports
Victor Bout is fluent in five languages and is described by intimates as a tough but charming man and a hard bargainer. Bout's business dealings have enabled him to buy expensive cars and residences in Moscow, on the Belgian coast and in South Africa and the emirate of Sharjah. He has left several countries one step ahead of official inquiries into his businesses and has been accused by United Nations and U.S. officials of supplying weapons to regimes around the world.
NEWS
May 19, 2002 | By Times Staff Writers
The files on Victor Bout in government agencies around the world brim with accounts of how he hunted game with rebel leaders, threw beer parties on jungle landing strips and consorted with dictators to build his business empire. For a decade, his armada of aircraft has hauled almost anything for a price: fish, coffee, relief supplies, flowers, and heads of state and their wives. International authorities say the 35-year-old Russian also operates the world's largest private weapons transport network, carrying military goods as small as Kalashnikov assault rifle rounds and as large as helicopter gunships.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2006 | Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writer
A sporting goods store in a small northern Pennsylvania town is the unlikely focus of a federal investigation into the suspected reemergence of the global arms transport network controlled by Russian businessman Victor Bout. Federal officials said this week that a recent search of the store near Wilkes-Barre, Pa., sought to learn whether a Bulgarian firm in Bout's business empire was being used to purchase restricted paramilitary items for a company tied to Russia's intelligence agency.
WORLD
October 7, 2010 | By Simon Roughneen and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
The last chance for an alleged arms smuggler dubbed the "Merchant of Death" to avoid extradition from Thailand to the United States on terrorism charges appears to lie with Thailand's prime minister, who faces a tough decision: offend the United States or offend Russia. The difficult diplomatic choice for Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva follows a ruling Tuesday by a Thai court clearing a legal obstacle that had barred the extradition. Victor Bout, a former Russian air force officer, is suspected of supplying weapons to various armies and terrorist groups in the Middle East, South America and Africa.
NEWS
March 1, 2002 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victor Bout, the Russian businessman accused of illegally trading arms with the Taliban and Al Qaeda terrorists, dropped into a central Moscow radio station Thursday for a live 37-minute interview, but Russian law enforcement officials made no move to arrest him. Bout offered the rare interview to the Echo of Moscow station, the city's only liberal radio outlet. After denying all involvement in illegal arms trafficking, he walked out of the station and disappeared onto the streets of Moscow.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man who identified himself as the brother of a Russian businessman accused of transporting arms for Al Qaeda terrorists said Wednesday that his sibling was a common air carrier, not an arms dealer, who had no idea what his cargo was. Sergei Bout, 41, angrily dismissed allegations against his 35-year-old brother, Victor. In a phone interview with The Times, he did not divulge his brother's whereabouts, but said he is "now living quite legally, residing in one country."
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