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Victor Conte

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SPORTS
December 4, 2009 | By Lance Pugmire
Andre Ward just became the WBA world super-middleweight boxing champion. Outfielder Marlon Byrd doubled his season-high home run total this year for the Texas Rangers. In March, British sprinter Dwain Chambers ran one of the five fastest 60-meter times in history. Each has been assisted by a man who earlier this decade orchestrated one of the darkest scams committed in sports history: Victor Conte. Conte, founder and head of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO), distributed then-undetectable steroids to some of the world's most talented athletes, including Olympic star Marion Jones, the personal trainer of baseball's all-time home run king Barry Bonds, boxer Shane Mosley, baseball sluggers Jason Giambi and Gary Sheffield and some NFL players.
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SPORTS
January 18, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
Victor Conte is one of sports' all-time scoundrels, the former head of the steroid-distributing BALCO lab who supplied steroids to home run champion Barry Bonds, Olympic champion Marion Jones and world boxing champion Shane Mosley, among others. After watching Lance Armstrong's long-delayed admissions to Oprah Winfrey of using performance-enhancing drugs to fuel his record seven Tour de France victories, Conte felt compelled to draw a distinction between himself and the cyclist. “Once BALCO was raided, I realized the best thing to do was tell the truth,” Conte said in an interview with The Times.
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SPORTS
October 23, 2003
Victor Conte is the central figure in a federal grand jury probe into the practices of Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO), a Burlingame, Calif., company that specializes in nutritional supplements that promise to boost athletic performance. Conte is president of BALCO. The company is reportedly being investigated on suspicion of violating federal tax and money-laundering laws. BALCO is also central to what Olympic anti-doping officials have described as the biggest steroid bust in U.S.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Dodgers fans are still celebrating the 50-game suspension of San Francisco Giants star Melky Cabrera for using a banned substance, which could very well end the Giants' hopes of defeating Los Angeles for the National League West title. But there's no joy in Bay City. The San Francisco Chronicle reports that even the Giants players have turned against Cabrera, casting serious doubt on whether he will ever again appear in an orange-and-black uniform. What's less clear is whether they're mad at him for cheating, or mad at him for cheating so inexpertly.
SPORTS
December 4, 2004 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
BALCO founder Victor Conte, in a magazine account that adds extensive detail to allegations he made Friday on a television newsmagazine show, says he provided track and field star Marion Jones with an array of banned drugs before the 2000 Sydney Games, where she won five medals, three of them gold.
SPORTS
June 16, 2004 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
The man at the center of the BALCO scandal is willing to plead guilty to federal charges of distributing steroids and testify against his former clients -- some of them U.S. Olympic athletes -- in exchange for a plea bargain, according to a letter sent Tuesday by his attorney to President Bush. BALCO founder Victor Conte can identify cheaters who might otherwise make the U.S. team at the Olympic Games in Athens, his lawyer, Robert Holley, wrote in the letter also sent to Atty. Gen.
SPORTS
July 15, 2005 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
Victor Conte, the figure at the center of the BALCO steroids scandal, has entered into a plea agreement with federal prosecutors, according to a statement Conte provided to The Times late Thursday night. The founder of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative -- accused of supplying performance-enhancing drugs to dozens of elite athletes -- said he has agreed to plead guilty to a single count of conspiracy to distribute steroids and a single count of laundering a portion of a check. "Mr.
SPORTS
December 16, 2004 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Track and field star Marion Jones on Wednesday sued BALCO founder Victor Conte for defamation, alleging he had falsely accused her of doping before and after the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games, where she won five medals, three gold. The lawsuit reiterates Jones' oft-stated assertion that she has "never taken banned performance-enhancing drugs." Filed in U.S.
SPORTS
July 19, 2008 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
Before writing the letter that British sprinter Dwain Chambers presented to anti-doping authorities about Chambers' deceptive practices, BALCO founder Victor Conte sounded alarms about the Olympic track and field success of Caribbean countries, including sprint power Jamaica. Conte said that he urged the World Anti-Doping Agency to investigate drug testing and supervision of athletes in Caribbean nations that lack an independent, state-run anti-doping body.
SPORTS
April 26, 2004 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
On a Sunday afternoon when Barry Bonds played sparingly, his attorney took a few swings at news reports further linking the San Francisco Giant slugger to steroid use. The San Francisco Chronicle and San Jose Mercury News reported that Victor Conte, the man at the center of a federal steroid investigation, told agents he had furnished steroids to Bonds.
SPORTS
December 4, 2009 | By Lance Pugmire
Andre Ward just became the WBA world super-middleweight boxing champion. Outfielder Marlon Byrd doubled his season-high home run total this year for the Texas Rangers. In March, British sprinter Dwain Chambers ran one of the five fastest 60-meter times in history. Each has been assisted by a man who earlier this decade orchestrated one of the darkest scams committed in sports history: Victor Conte. Conte, founder and head of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO), distributed then-undetectable steroids to some of the world's most talented athletes, including Olympic star Marion Jones, the personal trainer of baseball's all-time home run king Barry Bonds, boxer Shane Mosley, baseball sluggers Jason Giambi and Gary Sheffield and some NFL players.
SPORTS
February 27, 2009 | Lance Pugmire
By saving $150, Victor Conte may have also saved Barry Bonds from prison. Today in San Francisco, U.S. District Judge Susan Illston has summoned Greg Anderson, Bonds' former personal trainer, to answer whether he will testify in the home run king's perjury trial that starts next week.
SPORTS
July 19, 2008 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
Before writing the letter that British sprinter Dwain Chambers presented to anti-doping authorities about Chambers' deceptive practices, BALCO founder Victor Conte sounded alarms about the Olympic track and field success of Caribbean countries, including sprint power Jamaica. Conte said that he urged the World Anti-Doping Agency to investigate drug testing and supervision of athletes in Caribbean nations that lack an independent, state-run anti-doping body.
SPORTS
October 19, 2005 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Victor Conte, the self-described nutritionist at the center of the far-reaching BALCO doping scandal, was sentenced Tuesday in San Francisco federal court to eight months of confinement as part of a plea bargain struck with prosecutors. Conte, 55, of San Mateo, who entered guilty pleas in July to one count of conspiracy to distribute steroids and a second count of laundering a portion of a check, will spend four months in prison and another four under house arrest. He was also fined $10,000. U.
SPORTS
October 4, 2005 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Victor Conte, at the center of the BALCO sports-doping scandal, deserves four months behind bars, federal prosecutors said in court documents filed Monday that retraced allegations of doping by baseball slugger Barry Bonds, track star Marion Jones and others. Prosecutors, in keeping with a plea agreement struck in July, also said they were seeking an additional four months' house arrest for Conte, saying he "bears a heavy responsibility for the chain of events that led to this prosecution."
SPORTS
July 15, 2005 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
Victor Conte, the figure at the center of the BALCO steroids scandal, has entered into a plea agreement with federal prosecutors, according to a statement Conte provided to The Times late Thursday night. The founder of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative -- accused of supplying performance-enhancing drugs to dozens of elite athletes -- said he has agreed to plead guilty to a single count of conspiracy to distribute steroids and a single count of laundering a portion of a check. "Mr.
SPORTS
February 26, 2005
I noticed that the article about Barry Bonds' astonishing and bizarre news conference was juxtaposed against an advertisement for professional wrestling, and I realized that the difference between pro wrestlers and Barry Bonds (and all those other freaks produced by steroids) is ... nothing. Jeff Rabin Los Angeles Yes, Mr. Bonds, we know that Mark McGwire hit 49 home runs as a rookie. And we know that Jose Canseco may have been lying about a lot of the dribble he spewed.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Dodgers fans are still celebrating the 50-game suspension of San Francisco Giants star Melky Cabrera for using a banned substance, which could very well end the Giants' hopes of defeating Los Angeles for the National League West title. But there's no joy in Bay City. The San Francisco Chronicle reports that even the Giants players have turned against Cabrera, casting serious doubt on whether he will ever again appear in an orange-and-black uniform. What's less clear is whether they're mad at him for cheating, or mad at him for cheating so inexpertly.
SPORTS
February 26, 2005
I noticed that the article about Barry Bonds' astonishing and bizarre news conference was juxtaposed against an advertisement for professional wrestling, and I realized that the difference between pro wrestlers and Barry Bonds (and all those other freaks produced by steroids) is ... nothing. Jeff Rabin Los Angeles Yes, Mr. Bonds, we know that Mark McGwire hit 49 home runs as a rookie. And we know that Jose Canseco may have been lying about a lot of the dribble he spewed.
SPORTS
December 16, 2004 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Track and field star Marion Jones on Wednesday sued BALCO founder Victor Conte for defamation, alleging he had falsely accused her of doping before and after the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games, where she won five medals, three gold. The lawsuit reiterates Jones' oft-stated assertion that she has "never taken banned performance-enhancing drugs." Filed in U.S.
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