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Victor Costa

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December 29, 1989 | CINDY LAFAVRE YORKS, Lafavre Yorks, a free-lance writer, regularly contributes to the Times fashion pages
Anyone who's ever watched "Dallas," the TV soap, knows Texas women are notorious fans of glitter and glitz. This close to New Year's Eve--an excellent excuse to overdress, even by Big D standards--women from Laredo to Los Angeles find plenty of sparkle at the Terry Costa boutique. And the prices are worth the trip. Terry is the ex-wife of Victor Costa, the Texas-based designer who is internationally known for his reasonably priced "interpretations" of French couture creations.
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NEWS
March 29, 1991 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victor Costa, the Dallas designer known for haute couture copies that sell for a fraction of the originals, is doing something about the recession. He has lowered the price of his spring collection "by about 15%, to keep the registers ringing." And he has expanded his product range to include handbags and bridal gowns, two items that women buy no matter how low the economic barometer falls. Costa's collection, recently shown to a full house at I.
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NEWS
March 29, 1991 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victor Costa, the Dallas designer known for haute couture copies that sell for a fraction of the originals, is doing something about the recession. He has lowered the price of his spring collection "by about 15%, to keep the registers ringing." And he has expanded his product range to include handbags and bridal gowns, two items that women buy no matter how low the economic barometer falls. Costa's collection, recently shown to a full house at I.
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | THE FASHION STAFF
Victor Costa, whose "interpretations" of haute couture are worn by the likes of Ivana Trump, has a new feather in his cap. He has been hired by Christian Dior to design and manufacture a line of women's wear that will be sold exclusively in the United States. Costa's name won't be on the garments but that's fine with him:. "I'm very flattered and honored to be chosen and to be 'legitimized.'
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | THE FASHION STAFF
Victor Costa, whose "interpretations" of haute couture are worn by the likes of Ivana Trump, has a new feather in his cap. He has been hired by Christian Dior to design and manufacture a line of women's wear that will be sold exclusively in the United States. Costa's name won't be on the garments but that's fine with him:. "I'm very flattered and honored to be chosen and to be 'legitimized.'
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | BETTY GOODWIN
Victor Costa, the designer known for his reasonably priced, though luxurious-looking evening wear, isn't frugal when it comes to his own wardrobe. He spent $20,000 at the Ralph Lauren store in New York for his clothes this year, including $800 for a pair of alligator loafers. "Ralph Lauren is a security blanket to me," Costa remarked. "I put away all my Armani suits." Same Psychology The same psychology can't be applied to the women who buy Costa's clothes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Have Lawsuit, Will Win: A federal judge in Providence, R.I., effectively blocked Viacom International from distributing reruns of the Western series "Have Gun, Will Travel," ending a decades-old fight by the creator of the series' main character. A federal jury last month found that Viacom deliberately infringed the trademark of Victor DeCosta, 83, by broadcasting the series based on Paladin, the mustached persona he created for the rodeo, without DeCosta's consent.
NEWS
May 4, 1990 | JOANNA DENDEL
For all the Prom Queen hopefuls who can't quite cover that $7,000 ticket on the to-die-for Bob Mackie sequinned gown, or the $4,000 Vicky Tiel number with the big sweeping bow at the waist, here's the solution--rent it, don't buy it. After all, you're only going to wear it once and the teen-age weekly allowance or credit card limit will never cover the cost of couture.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES
The theme was black and white but ultimately it was "anything goes" last Friday night at the Black and White Ball, San Francisco's flashy, splashy block-party-to-end-all-block-parties. More than 13,000 men (some in gowns) and women (some in tuxedos) twirled on half a dozen dance floors to the swingy strains of the Harry James Orchestra or the down-home Western boogie of the Texas Tornados or the miscellaneous music of dozens of other bands.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Irked by erroneous reports that her inaugural gown was being prepared by a trendy designer, Marilyn Quayle Tuesday let the fashion cat out of the bag: Her clothing, and that of her 10-year-old daughter, Corinne, will be the handiwork of three Los Angeles fashion students. Daniel Caudill, 22, has designed the outfit that Quayle, the wife of Vice President-elect Dan Quayle, will wear to her husband's swearing-in.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | CINDY LAFAVRE YORKS, Lafavre Yorks, a free-lance writer, regularly contributes to the Times fashion pages
Anyone who's ever watched "Dallas," the TV soap, knows Texas women are notorious fans of glitter and glitz. This close to New Year's Eve--an excellent excuse to overdress, even by Big D standards--women from Laredo to Los Angeles find plenty of sparkle at the Terry Costa boutique. And the prices are worth the trip. Terry is the ex-wife of Victor Costa, the Texas-based designer who is internationally known for his reasonably priced "interpretations" of French couture creations.
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | BETTY GOODWIN
Victor Costa, the designer known for his reasonably priced, though luxurious-looking evening wear, isn't frugal when it comes to his own wardrobe. He spent $20,000 at the Ralph Lauren store in New York for his clothes this year, including $800 for a pair of alligator loafers. "Ralph Lauren is a security blanket to me," Costa remarked. "I put away all my Armani suits." Same Psychology The same psychology can't be applied to the women who buy Costa's clothes.
NEWS
January 25, 1996
Can you name the top three fashion highlights in the last 50 years in this country? Your wedding doesn't count, but Lynda Bird Johnson Robb's and Tricia Nixon Cox's weddings do, at least to fashion illustrator Steven Stipelman, who spoke last week at the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace in Yorba Linda. His presentation was the first of six lectures in the Dressing the First Lady series that runs through June 12. What about the third highlight?
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