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Victor Denoble

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NEWS
July 19, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't like entering the Peace Corps, but Victor DeNoble hoped to do some good when he joined the tobacco industry. The year was 1980 and DeNoble, then a 30-year-old Ph.D. in experimental psychology, accepted an offer to run a secret pharmacology lab for Philip Morris Inc., maker of Marlboro and the world's largest cigarette manufacturer. DeNoble was to do research on nicotine's effects on the behavior of rats.
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NEWS
July 19, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't like entering the Peace Corps, but Victor DeNoble hoped to do some good when he joined the tobacco industry. The year was 1980 and DeNoble, then a 30-year-old Ph.D. in experimental psychology, accepted an offer to run a secret pharmacology lab for Philip Morris Inc., maker of Marlboro and the world's largest cigarette manufacturer. DeNoble was to do research on nicotine's effects on the behavior of rats.
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NEWS
April 29, 1994 | From Associated Press
Two former scientists for Philip Morris USA told a House panel Thursday that the company suppressed their research and abruptly closed their lab after their studies on rats more than a decade ago raised serious questions about the potential addictive nature of nicotine. "You cannot prove addiction from a rat, but you can say that further work is needed," Victor DeNoble told the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on health and the environment. "It is a real strong indicator."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1995 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
America's favorite whipping boy, the federal government regulator, is about to get whipped as never before in the new, GOP-controlled Congress convening this week. Whether the whipping is deserved is another matter. "Frontline's" first 1995 report, "The Nicotine War," implies that the demonization of regulators may be the triumph of politics over reason.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1996 | MYRON LEVIN and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A former R.J. Reynolds scientist has testified that company lawyers and executives disbanded a major research project on smoking and emphysema more than 25 years ago because they feared the findings could be turned against the industry in court. In a deposition in a tobacco lawsuit in Texas, the former scientist, Joseph E. Bumgarner, told how he and 25 other members of Reynolds' biological research division in Winston-Salem, N.C.
NEWS
April 15, 1986 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
A new drug that may help people with certain types of memory disorders may soon be on the market in this country. The drug, called vinpocetine, appears to improve an individual's ability to acquire new memories and to restore memories that have been disrupted, it was disclosed Monday.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In another sign that President Clinton will push for a toughened tobacco settlement, administration officials on Friday met with four tobacco industry whistle-blowers, introduced them to the media as "American heroes" and said they had listened carefully to their warnings that cigarette makers have not disclosed everything they know about smoking's health hazards. "I think the major message of today . . .
NEWS
April 3, 1996 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Ian Uydess, the moment of truth came in front of the television set. It was a Sunday night in February and a whistle-blowing scientist named Jeffrey Wigand was revealing dark secrets about the nation's cigarette business. Uydess knew those same secrets. A former cancer researcher, he had been lured to Philip Morris USA in 1977 with the promise that he could help engineer a safer cigarette.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1998 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big Tobacco is known as a formidable legal adversary, skilled and even ruthless in the courtroom. Yet the industry is being slowly undone by its former secrets, having obligingly preserved piles of incriminating documents for its enemies to use. Disclosure of the documents, many dating back 40 years, has done enormous damage, outraging citizens and forcing once-helpful politicians to climb on the anti-tobacco bandwagon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2011
The 2011 Holiday Movie Preview is a broad snapshot of films opening through early January. Release dates and other details, as compiled by Oliver Gettell, are subject to change. Nov. 9 J. Edgar A biopic about the life of J. Edgar Hoover, who ran the FBI for nearly 50 years. With Leonardo DiCaprio, Naomi Watts, Armie Hammer and Judi Dench. Written by Dustin Lance Black. Directed by Clint Eastwood. Warner Bros. Pictures Nov. 11 11-11-11 A famous author who has lost his wife and son travels to Spain to see his estranged brother and dying father, where he discovers that the time 11:11 is tied to tragic events.
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