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Victor Fortner

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1995
Families who buried their dead at a Santa Fe Springs cemetery have sued the owners over illegal disinterments and multiple burials that allegedly took place. The Los Angeles Superior Court lawsuit includes about 100 plaintiffs, all relatives of people buried at Paradise Memorial Park, but that figure is expected to grow, lawyer Mike Arias said Tuesday. "When all is done and said it will probably be over 1,000 [plaintiffs]," Arias said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1995
Families who buried their dead at a Santa Fe Springs cemetery have sued the owners over illegal disinterments and multiple burials that allegedly took place. The Los Angeles Superior Court lawsuit includes about 100 plaintiffs, all relatives of people buried at Paradise Memorial Park, but that figure is expected to grow, lawyer Mike Arias said Tuesday. "When all is done and said it will probably be over 1,000 [plaintiffs]," Arias said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1995 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The remains of scores of bodies, which allegedly were unearthed and dumped in a dirt pile at a Santa Fe Springs cemetery so plots could be resold, were interred Thursday in a mass grave while dozens of onlookers worried that their deceased loved ones were part of the unceremonious burial. State officials plan to present evidence of the operators' activities to the district attorney's office as early as today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1995 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The remains of scores of bodies, which allegedly were unearthed and dumped in a dirt pile at a Santa Fe Springs cemetery so plots could be resold, were interred Thursday in a mass grave while dozens of onlookers worried that their deceased loved ones were part of the unceremonious burial. State officials plan to present evidence of the operators' activities to the district attorney's office as early as today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1995 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State officials have seized a Santa Fe Springs cemetery where operators allegedly buried bodies together and resold some grave sites after digging up and dumping interred remains in open piles, officials said Tuesday. A criminal investigation is continuing into operators of Paradise Memorial Park, where state investigators seized records and took control of the weed-covered facility Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1997
A groundskeeper who pleaded no contest to charges that he ordered workers at a Santa Fe Springs cemetery to dig up nearly two dozen graves so that the plots could be resold was sentenced Tuesday to three years in state prison. Victor Fortner, 50, was also ordered to pay at least $28,000 to families whose loved ones were disinterred between 1993 and 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1995
Gravediggers dug up the remains of a corpse Thursday at the Paradise Memorial Park in Santa Fe Springs for relocation today to another area of the cemetery. It was the first of what are expected to be numerous relocations at the behest of surviving family members, who are distressed about alleged improprieties at the cemetery. State officials seized the cemetery last month after turning up evidence that its operators unearthed bodies to resell graves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1997
Two family members who owned and ran a cemetery in Santa Fe Springs were sentenced to jail time and each fined $500,000 Friday for their roles in a scheme to dig up and resell grave sites. In May, Alma Fraction, 70, owner of the Paradise Memorial Park, and her 32-year-old daughter, Felicia, who managed the cemetery, pleaded no contest to three counts each of unlawful use of endowment care funds. On Friday, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Morris B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1996 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family owner-managers of Paradise Memorial Park cemetery in Santa Fe Springs pleaded no contest Monday to charges alleging the family embezzled funds set up for cemetery maintenance and dug up graves to resell the plots. Groundskeeper Victor Fortner, 48, was indicted by a grand jury in January on 69 counts of criminally disinterring human remains and illegal use of cemetery funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending legal action by relatives whose family graves had been mishandled by a Santa Fe Springs cemetery, a court commissioner approved a $3.9-million settlement Thursday with about 40 mortuaries in the Los Angeles area. "The court made the right decision. I don't think anything can be done to improve the settlement amount received," said Mike Arias, one of the lead attorneys for the plaintiffs. But some of the families involved said they felt little sense of closure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1995 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State officials have seized a Santa Fe Springs cemetery where operators allegedly buried bodies together and resold some grave sites after digging up and dumping interred remains in open piles, officials said Tuesday. A criminal investigation is continuing into operators of Paradise Memorial Park, where state investigators seized records and took control of the weed-covered facility Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most grisly case to come out of the Southern California cemetery scandals, the groundskeeper of a Santa Fe Springs graveyard faces 69 felony counts of illegally digging up remains, grand theft, fraud and embezzlement, authorities said Tuesday. The groundskeeper's mother, who owns Paradise Memorial Park, and sister, general manager of the facility, also face three counts each of embezzling maintenance funds from the cemetery, Los Angeles County sheriff's officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1995 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In ancient Egypt, thieves plundered golden treasure from the tombs of kings. In 1990s Los Angeles, the burial gold lies in the real estate, in the grave sites themselves. There will always be more dead people, but there will not always be more land to put them in.
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