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Victor Girard

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1997 | STEPHEN BYRD
In 1923, Victor Girard dreamed of selling small pieces of California living to harried city dwellers back East and throughout the Midwest. "I'll tell you what I see: a Greater Los Angeles solid to the Pacific and reaching back into the adjacent valleys," he said in a 1939 news story.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1997 | STEPHEN BYRD
In 1923, Victor Girard dreamed of selling small pieces of California living to harried city dwellers back East and throughout the Midwest. "I'll tell you what I see: a Greater Los Angeles solid to the Pacific and reaching back into the adjacent valleys," he said in a 1939 news story.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1991 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Los Angeles, where real estate is king, it is fitting that the legacy of a developer--to wit, a model home--should be hailed as a landmark. And that is what's happening as the cultural arbiters of the city of Los Angeles tout a tiny Hansel-and-Gretel bungalow in Woodland Hills, the legacy of bygone subdivider Victor Girard, as a candidate for landmark status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1991 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Los Angeles, where real estate is king, it is fitting that the legacy of a developer--to wit, a model home--should be hailed as a landmark. And that is what's happening as the cultural arbiters of the city of Los Angeles tout a tiny Hansel-and-Gretel bungalow in Woodland Hills, the legacy of bygone subdivider Victor Girard, as a candidate for landmark status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1987 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Robbie Jacobson's yard stood out from others in her neighborhood when she moved to Woodland Hills five years ago. Hers was the only one with a vacant space where its curb-side pepper tree should have been. "I was embarrassed," Jacobson recalled. "I started saving up to buy a tree to go into the empty spot." Jacobson is not alone anymore. Twenty-five of the other 60-year-old trees along the 22000 block of Dumetz Road have died mysteriously, leaving homeowners frustrated and officials puzzled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1992
The Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission has denied historic status to a tiny, ramshackle cottage home built by Victor Girard, the founder of Woodland Hills. But commission members agreed to reconsider their decision once renovation of the now uninhabitable house at 4164 Saltillo St. is complete. The commission's 5 to 0 vote this week means that the house may be demolished if city building and safety inspectors believe that the rehabilitation work that is under way is proceeding too slowly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1988
A year-old building moratorium designed to prevent the continued development of large houses on small lots in a hillside area of Woodland Hills was extended for six months by the Los Angeles City Council on Friday. The extension, approved by a 12-0 vote, will give city planners more time to review ways of regulating development on an estimated 2,000 small lots around the Woodland Hills Country Club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1986
A Los Angeles City Council committee Tuesday recommended approval of a building moratorium in a 1 1/2-square-mile hillside area of Woodland Hills where residents have complained about construction of large houses on small lots. The 2-0 Planning and Environment Committee vote sent the measure to the full council, which usually follows the panel's recommendation. Committee Chairwoman Pat Russell was absent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2001 | DALONDO MOULTRIE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City crews began cutting down 39 diseased California pepper trees Tuesday along a stretch of Canoga Avenue from Ventura Boulevard to Arcos Drive that historians say are part of an original grove that gave Woodland Hills its name. The trees--sealed off with yellow warning tape and barricades--are close to death and will be removed, said Robert Wallace, an arborist hired by the city to inspect the decades-old trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1992 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Get out the Thomas Guides and the pens--it's another round of "Rename the Neighborhood." This time, a neighborhood in southwest Canoga Park has defected to Woodland Hills in search of greater prestige and higher property values. About 800 residents of the neighborhood bordered by Victory Boulevard, Vanowen Street, Topanga Canyon Boulevard and Shoup Avenue petitioned Los Angeles City Councilwoman Joy Picus in early June to redraw their community boundary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1987 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Robbie Jacobson's yard stood out from others in her neighborhood when she moved to Woodland Hills five years ago. Hers was the only one with a vacant space where its curb-side pepper tree should have been. "I was embarrassed," Jacobson recalled. "I started saving up to buy a tree to go into the empty spot." Jacobson is not alone anymore. Twenty-five of the other 60-year-old trees along the 22000 block of Dumetz Road have died mysteriously, leaving homeowners frustrated and officials puzzled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1999 | JAMES E. FOWLER
Communities in the San Fernando Valley have been caught up in a trend of changing their names. Sepulveda became North Hills; an area of Canoga Park was renamed West Hills; Valley Village, West Toluca Lake, Valley Glen and others soon followed. Some people scoff, but changing names is nothing new in the Valley. * In the early 1920s, Agoura was known as Independence. In 1924, after Paramount Studios bought what is now known as the Paramount Ranch, the area changed its name to Picture City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1986 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
Concerned about problems caused by construction of large houses on substandard lots, Los Angeles City Councilman Marvin Braude on Wednesday asked the City Council to approve a building moratorium for a 1 1/2-square-mile hillside area of Woodland Hills. The moratorium would give city planners time to review ways of preventing excessive development on an estimated 2,000 small lots around the Woodland Hills Country Club, Braude said.
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