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Victor Hugo

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
In her books about her early life, M.F.K. Fisher talks about her parents dressing up and going out to The Victor Hugo to eat. It was obviously a big and very grown-up restaurant. It was, in fact, a downtown landmark until it moved to Beverly Hills in 1934 and ultimately closed. A few years ago, Max au Triangle opened on the site of the old Victor Hugo. That, unfortunately, closed, too. Now there's a new restaurant on the same site. It's called . . . Victor Hugo's, and it's at 235 N.
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WORLD
June 23, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Victor Hugo Romo marches past the walled mansions of Las Lomas, surrounded by an entourage. Staffers with clipboards and tablets. Skinny men with brooms and machetes. A handful of residents. More than a few cameras. "Tree trimmers!" he shouts. And the tree trimmers scurry to a droopy willow, chopping away at branches that threaten power lines. "Pot-hole patchers!" And their machine spits into a crater in the middle of the street. Romo is the new borough president in the wealthiest enclave of Mexico City, possibly of all Mexico.
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NEWS
January 7, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
France kicked off the 200th anniversary of the birth of "Les Miserables" author Victor Hugo, who the country's press said was one of the earliest advocates of the euro. The Journal du Dimanche weekly reprinted extracts of Hugo's impassioned 1855 call for a "United States of Europe" and a "continental currency, resting on all Europe as its capital and driven by the activity of 200 million men."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2010 | By Ching-Ching Ni
When Ron Bloom joined a San Gabriel Valley language club to practice Mandarin, he figured he might be one of the few non-Chinese in the group. Then he met the club's leader: Victor Hugo Miranda Jr. "I was expecting a Taiwanese guy," said Bloom, 49, a radar scientist in El Segundo who studied Mandarin in college . "I've never met a guy from South America who speaks Chinese. I almost fell over." Miranda, 35, originally from Costa Rica, took the helm of Mandarin Friends two years ago and has helped transform it from a core membership of about 150 to more than 700 registered members, who interact with each other largely over the Web. Members are mostly young professionals and include Asians and non-Asians.
BOOKS
May 13, 2001 | JOHN HOLLANDER, John Hollander is the author of numerous books, including "Figurehead: And Other Poems," "Selected Poetry," "Tesserae and Other Poems" and the anthology "Committed to Memory." He is Sterling professor of English at Yale University
For 20th century readers of English with even some knowledge of French literature, Victor Hugo's monumental poetic oeuvre comprising well over 155,000 lines--and this aside from the verse of his dramas--has stood like a vast shadowed mountain, unvisited and unclimbed, celebrated and ignored. It became the object of averted gaze in an age of modernism, when the agenda outlined in Marcel Raymond's "From Baudelaire to Sur-realism" became requisite for the assimilation of French literature.
NEWS
May 25, 1985 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
For France, 1985 is officially the "Year of Victor Hugo." The romantic novelist, poet, playwright and polemicist died 100 years ago, and the French are celebrating the anniversary with performances, readings, biographies, exhibitions, lectures, a new edition of his complete works and a commemorative stamp. The Ministry of Culture is even sponsoring a T-shirt with the design of a youth on his knees looking upward and crying out, "Hugo, you're the tops."
BOOKS
February 22, 1998 | DOUGLAS JOHNSON, Douglas Johnson is emeritus professor of French history at the University of London. A considerably shorter version of this review appeared in the Spectator
In March 1885, there was great excitement in France. It had been reported that the French army had suffered a severe defeat in Indochina. Prime Minister Jules Ferry was blamed for this supposed disaster, and his government was voted out by a noisily indignant Assembly. When he left the parliamentary building, he found himself surrounded by a hostile mob that threatened to throw him into the Seine River.
TRAVEL
April 18, 1993
I enjoyed "Les Miserables"--both the book and the musical. However, after reading "A Sunny Bit of Britain Off the Coast of France" (March 21), I am mystified as to how Victor Hugo wrote his novel on Guernsey during the French Revolution, before he was born, and set in a period later in French history. Guernsey must truly be a remarkable place. RUTH ROE Huntington Beach Editors' note: Victor Hugo did write "Les Miserables" on Guernsey, but it was published in 1862, 73 years after the French Revolution's climax in 1789.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Royal Shakespeare Company's much touted "Les Miserables" makes its New York debut tonight, riding a crest of advance publicity and and ticket sales of more than $11 million. The big musical based on the Victor Hugo novel opens at the Broadway Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"Les Miserables" by Victor Hugo. Read by Christopher Cazenove. Newman/Dove (two cassettes, abridged). Reducing Hugo's massive masterpiece to just under three hours' listening time is abridgement indeed. Remarkably, adapters Timothy Helgeson and Holly Sklar manage to preserve not only the story lines and a large population of characters but also a sense of Hugo's vigorous style as it survives and shines through translation.
BOOKS
May 13, 2007 | Benjamin Lytal, Benjamin Lytal teaches at the Pratt Institute and writes fiction.
ALTHOUGH books about other books abound, there are very few that actually tell us what it is like to read. "The Temptation of the Impossible," Mario Vargas Llosa's book about Victor Hugo's "Les Miserables," is one of these rare confessions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2006 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
During the 1960s, historian and Vietnam watcher Bernard Fall described Cao Dai -- the eclectic Vietnamese religion whose saints include William Shakespeare and Victor Hugo -- as a "dinosaur," headed for oblivion after peaking in the 1950s. Not so, says Janet Hoskins, a USC anthropology professor who is writing a book on Cao Dai. Both in Vietnam and places like Southern California where Vietnamese have settled, the faith is undergoing a renaissance, she said in an interview this week.
OPINION
August 2, 2004
Re "One Little Thing Is Missing," editorial, July 29: The project of remaking downtown Los Angeles should not be limited to the interests of "those with brand-name tastes and fat wallets." The public authority overseeing this project should find ways to access public opinion, if not involve the public whose interests it is designed to serve. Los Angeles is a diverse, dynamic and complex region, and Angelenos deserve a city center that reflects these traits. One day I hope that visitors will see an architectural design that reflects the city's soul as much as its commerce.
NEWS
January 7, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
France kicked off the 200th anniversary of the birth of "Les Miserables" author Victor Hugo, who the country's press said was one of the earliest advocates of the euro. The Journal du Dimanche weekly reprinted extracts of Hugo's impassioned 1855 call for a "United States of Europe" and a "continental currency, resting on all Europe as its capital and driven by the activity of 200 million men."
BOOKS
May 13, 2001 | JOHN HOLLANDER, John Hollander is the author of numerous books, including "Figurehead: And Other Poems," "Selected Poetry," "Tesserae and Other Poems" and the anthology "Committed to Memory." He is Sterling professor of English at Yale University
For 20th century readers of English with even some knowledge of French literature, Victor Hugo's monumental poetic oeuvre comprising well over 155,000 lines--and this aside from the verse of his dramas--has stood like a vast shadowed mountain, unvisited and unclimbed, celebrated and ignored. It became the object of averted gaze in an age of modernism, when the agenda outlined in Marcel Raymond's "From Baudelaire to Sur-realism" became requisite for the assimilation of French literature.
NEWS
May 7, 2001 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First, Margaret Mitchell, and now, helas, Victor Hugo. Javert, the villainous police inspector who pursues sinner-turned-saint Jean Valjean relentlessly through the pages of Hugo's epic 19th century novel, "Les Miserables," has been resurrected in the pages of a new unauthorized sequel. And Hugo's descendants are furieux.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1998
Movies The "Sleepless in Seattle" team reunites for "You've Got Mail," an update of the 1940 classic "The Shop Around the Corner." Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan, above, star for Nora Ephron in the romantic comedy about two booksellers who clash in real life while unwittingly courting each other via modem. It opens in general release Friday. * "The Prince of Egypt," an animated historical epic, tells the story of Moses (with voice provided by Val Kilmer) and Ramses (voice of Ralph Fiennes).
TRAVEL
January 5, 1997
Re: "Travel Horrors" (Oct. 27), here is another: It happened on a Friday night in a hotel in Paris. I had gone to the lobby to get something, and when I returned I was unable to open the door. My wife, Natalie, who was inside, was equally unsuccessful. She called the concierge on the phone, but he failed in his attempt. Then an employee climbed a ladder and entered the room through a window, but he also failed to open it. A locksmith couldn't open it either. When I complained that my wife had the bottle of scotch on her side of the door, they obligingly brought me half a glass of the stuff and I settled in an easy chair.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2001 | LISA LIPMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
Michael Pink knows that even a hideously deformed, bell-ringing hunchback can be graceful. That's why Pink has choreographed a ballet version of "The Hunchback of Notre Dame," a decidedly gritty, tutu-free version of Victor Hugo's classic 1831 novel that made its debut at the Boston Ballet on Thursday night. "Hunchback" tells the story of the deformed bell-ringer Quasimodo and his unrequited love for the gypsy dancer Esmeralda.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The miserable ones are back, the huddled masses yearning to breathe free, nail those high notes and ride that turntable. "Les Miserables," certainly the most durable show-business treaty ever signed by the French and the English, greets the new century at the Ahmanson Theatre, where the latest Los Angeles touring engagement continues through Feb. 12. It's in excellent shape.
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