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Victor Hugo Cardenas

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September 27, 1993 | Reuters
Aymara leader Victor Hugo Cardenas became the first Indian to rule Bolivia since the Spanish Conquest when he took over as acting president Sunday. Bolivian President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada transferred the reins of government to Cardenas, the country's vice president, in a simple ceremony at Santa Cruz airport in central Bolivia.
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NEWS
September 27, 1993 | Reuters
Aymara leader Victor Hugo Cardenas became the first Indian to rule Bolivia since the Spanish Conquest when he took over as acting president Sunday. Bolivian President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada transferred the reins of government to Cardenas, the country's vice president, in a simple ceremony at Santa Cruz airport in central Bolivia.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1994 | MARTIN EDWIN ANDERSEN, Martin Edwin Andersen, a member of former Sen. Cranston's professional staff on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is writing a book on the future of Native Americans in the 21st Century.
The bloody rebellion by Native Americans in Chiapas, coming at the end of the United Nations' "International Year of the World's Indigenous Peoples," underscores the urgent need to address the needs of Latin America's 35 million Indians, particularly their political rights and the protection of their lands and resources.
MAGAZINE
June 29, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Robin Wright, based in Washington, D.C., covers global affairs for The Times. Her last article for the magazine was a profile of Army legend Alfred M. Baker
One grew up in a Harem, another in the poverty of the Andean highlands, another with an uncle because his parents were suspected of sedition. Some tripped into power; others had ideas that inexorably elevated them to the forefront. The common denominator is that each is a defining force at the end of the 20th century in his or her region--and often well beyond--and symbolizes a new approach or solution to a critical issue of the1990s. Each is, in a word, a leader.
TRAVEL
August 20, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Dust and dirt is all you see, then you see nothing. And then the nothing fades and a stagecoach roars into the distance, and three fugitives stand there, taking measure of a dismal high-plains landscape. This is about halfway through "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," and the fugitives are Butch, Sundance and Etta, the schoolteacher, who have decided to once and for all lose that persistent posse. They have gone far south.
NEWS
February 18, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a graceful rhythm as old as China, 43-year-old peasant Yang Guilian stood in ankle-deep water and transplanted a handful of rice to a carefully prepared paddy. In fertile land south of Hangzhou Bay--the cradle of rice cultivation dating back at least 7,000 years to the Neolithic Age--Yang, loose cotton trousers rolled above her knees, handled the thin green seedlings in a manner unchanged for thousands of years.
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