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Victor Jara

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WORLD
September 9, 2003 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
He was killed here, the workers say, down this narrow hallway, where basketball players and boxers and rock singers exit the dressing room before a game, match or concert. No one who works at the stadium now witnessed the execution of Victor Jara, the folksinger whose death during the 1973 military coup became an enduring Latin American legend. But over the years, workers at Chile Stadium have passed down the stories about how and where it happened. "People say it happened in this place.
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WORLD
September 5, 2013 | By Chris Kraul
BOGOTA, Colombia - With the 40th anniversary of the overthrow of Chilean President Salvador Allende approaching, it's evident that scars from the violence and human rights abuses committed during and after the military coup are still raw. The family of folk singer Victor Jara, one of the best known of the more than 4,000 people who were killed and disappeared in the Sept. 11, 1973 coup, filed a civil suit Wednesday night against one of his alleged killers, a former Chilean army lieutenant now living in Florida.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1993 | ENRIQUE LOPETEGUI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On Saturday night, a group of Los Angeles activists and artists will gather at the First Unitarian Church to pay tribute to slain Chilean singer-songwriter Victor Jara, whose 1973 death symbolizes the fate of tens of thousands of Latin Americans persecuted for their political ideas. Among the participants: actress Beth Broderick, and singers Erica Verba, Mari Riddle and Mercedes Marquez of the group Desbordes.
WORLD
September 9, 2003 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
He was killed here, the workers say, down this narrow hallway, where basketball players and boxers and rock singers exit the dressing room before a game, match or concert. No one who works at the stadium now witnessed the execution of Victor Jara, the folksinger whose death during the 1973 military coup became an enduring Latin American legend. But over the years, workers at Chile Stadium have passed down the stories about how and where it happened. "People say it happened in this place.
WORLD
September 5, 2013 | By Chris Kraul
BOGOTA, Colombia - With the 40th anniversary of the overthrow of Chilean President Salvador Allende approaching, it's evident that scars from the violence and human rights abuses committed during and after the military coup are still raw. The family of folk singer Victor Jara, one of the best known of the more than 4,000 people who were killed and disappeared in the Sept. 11, 1973 coup, filed a civil suit Wednesday night against one of his alleged killers, a former Chilean army lieutenant now living in Florida.
NEWS
September 16, 1994 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came together in a storefront meetinghouse near Melrose and Vermont--Anglos and Latinos, new immigrants and old-time activists--to remember those slain in the Chilean coup of September, 1973. Most especially, they came to honor Victor Jara, whose songs were the anthems of Chile's poor and oppressed. Jara was only 39 when silenced by Gen. Augusto Pinochet's troops, but his music lives. "This is a very emotional night," organizer Paul Baker says.
WORLD
May 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Retired army Col. Mario Manriquez has been charged in the killing of renowned Chilean folk singer Victor Jara shortly after the 1973 coup led by Gen. Augusto Pinochet. Jara was a Communist Party activist who backed Chile's elected socialist president, Salvador Allende. The singer was arrested after the Sept. 11, 1973, military coup. Court papers indicate he was tortured and shot to death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Michael Stillman, 87, a founder of Monitor Records, an eclectic music label that featured everything from Russian classical music to Polynesian hulas, died April 15 at his home in Somers, N.Y. Born in Saratov, Russia, Stillman moved with his family to New York City when he was a child. He graduated from New York University and served in the Army as a clerk and typist during World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
Monday Evening Concerts went out with a serendipitous bang this season, courtesy of Terra Australis. The Australian/American ensemble made its local debut Monday at Bing Theater of the County Museum of Art as a late replacement for the Seymour Group. Unlike many other new music groups, Terra Australis is not simply a collective from which emerge soloists and smaller ensembles.
OPINION
December 12, 2006 | Dave Zirin, DAVE ZIRIN is the author of "What's My Name, Fool? Sports and Resistance in the United States."
IN 1995, I went to Chile's National Stadium to watch a soccer match. Soccer was something I neither enjoyed nor understood, but the game was hardly on my mind; instead, it was the arena. I was 20 years old and had come to Chile to study. I also hoped to meet some of the surviving allies of leftist President Salvador Allende, who had been toppled in the 1973 coup by Gen. Augusto Pinochet.
NEWS
September 16, 1994 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came together in a storefront meetinghouse near Melrose and Vermont--Anglos and Latinos, new immigrants and old-time activists--to remember those slain in the Chilean coup of September, 1973. Most especially, they came to honor Victor Jara, whose songs were the anthems of Chile's poor and oppressed. Jara was only 39 when silenced by Gen. Augusto Pinochet's troops, but his music lives. "This is a very emotional night," organizer Paul Baker says.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1993 | ENRIQUE LOPETEGUI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On Saturday night, a group of Los Angeles activists and artists will gather at the First Unitarian Church to pay tribute to slain Chilean singer-songwriter Victor Jara, whose 1973 death symbolizes the fate of tens of thousands of Latin Americans persecuted for their political ideas. Among the participants: actress Beth Broderick, and singers Erica Verba, Mari Riddle and Mercedes Marquez of the group Desbordes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The short and tragic life of Phil Ochs is as involving as the music he wrote and played, and that is saying a great deal. If you remember the 1960s, you more than likely remember the singer-songwriter who composed hundreds of songs, many of them, as can be heard on the strong and forceful documentary "Phil Ochs: There But for Fortune," beautiful and melodic as well as pointedly political. It was Ochs who wrote "I Ain't Marching Anymore," sometimes called the anthem of the anti-Vietnam War movement.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | MARY ANNE PEREZ, Mary Anne Perez is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition.
Their musical instruments--the charango, the zampona, the quena and the tiple-- are symbols of a culture and history that emanate from the sounds of Latin America. Under the Chilean military regime of Gen. Augusto Pinochet, the instruments also represented a cultural era that officials wanted to leave in the past.
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