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Victor Kravchenko

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May 11, 2003 | Mitchell Landsberg, Mitchell Landsberg is a Times staff writer.
As a child growing up half wild on a remote Arizona ranch, Andrew Earle looked forward every summer to his family's annual trip East. Cowboys would take Andrew and the rest of his family--mother Cynthia, brother Tony, two adopted children from Central America, a nanny, assorted bags and dogs--27 miles over dirt roads to the train station in Morristown, Ariz. There they would board for New York City. It was the 1950s.
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MAGAZINE
May 11, 2003 | Mitchell Landsberg, Mitchell Landsberg is a Times staff writer.
As a child growing up half wild on a remote Arizona ranch, Andrew Earle looked forward every summer to his family's annual trip East. Cowboys would take Andrew and the rest of his family--mother Cynthia, brother Tony, two adopted children from Central America, a nanny, assorted bags and dogs--27 miles over dirt roads to the train station in Morristown, Ariz. There they would board for New York City. It was the 1950s.
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May 11, 2003
As the son of Victor A. Kravchenko, one of the first Soviet defectors to inform the worldwide public about the Stalinist system, including the gulag labor camps, I feel it important to respond to Lesley Chamberlain's important review of "Gulag: A History" by Anne Applebaum ("Dark Side of the Moon," April 27). First, Alexander Solzhenitsyn did not coin the word "gulag." It is the official Soviet term from the early 1930s, an abbreviation for the Soviet labor-camp system. Its usage appeared in the West in my father's book "I Chose Freedom," published by Scribner's in 1946, more than a quarter of a century before Solzhenitsyn wrote "The Gulag Archipelago," which was first published in Paris in 1973.
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