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Victor Manuel Alcala Navarro

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000
Victor Manuel Alcala Navarro, a key figure in the biggest drug money laundering investigation in U.S. history, will be sentenced to nearly 23 years in prison under a plea agreement announced Monday with federal prosecutors here. Alcala, a Mexican national, pleaded guilty to two new drug money laundering charges in federal court Monday, for a total of 27 criminal counts to which he has entered guilty pleas since his arrest in May 1998.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victor Manuel Alcala Navarro, a central figure in the biggest drug money laundering case in U.S. history, was sentenced to 22 years and 10 months in prison Friday by a Los Angeles federal judge. Alcala, a money broker for the Juarez drug cartel, was one of 100 people indicted in 1998 along with three Mexican banks in Operation Casablanca, a massive undercover probe by the U.S. Customs Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key defendant in Operation Casablanca, the massive drug money laundering case against Mexican banks and bankers, pleaded guilty Monday in Los Angeles federal court. Victor Manuel Alcala Navarro, a reputed money launderer for the Juarez drug cartel, entered his plea to 28 criminal counts three weeks before he was to go on trial on money laundering and conspiracy charges. Alcala, known as El Doctor, fell prey to a sting operation by undercover U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1999 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four Mexican nationals have quietly entered guilty pleas and agreed to testify against fellow defendants indicted in Operation Casablanca, the biggest drug money laundering sting in U.S. history. They are the first defectors from the ranks of about 40 Mexican and Venezuelan bankers, businessmen and suspected drug cartel members arrested in May after a two-year cross-border investigation by undercover agents from the U.S. Customs Service. Seventy others indicted are fugitives.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG and MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Operating out of a storefront in a gritty neighborhood of Santa Fe Springs, undercover agents from the U.S. Customs Service carried out a three-year sting that ended Monday with the indictment of three Mexican banks and 107 people on charges of laundering millions of dollars for Latin American drug-smuggling cartels. The indictments returned by a Los Angeles federal grand jury represent "the culmination of the largest, most comprehensive drug money laundering case in U.S.
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