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Victor Mckusick

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HEALTH
November 3, 1997 | FRANK D. ROYLANCE, BALTIMORE SUN
Maybe it was discipline imposed by cold early mornings and the cows waiting impatiently in his father's dairy barn in Maine. Or maybe it is just genetic. In either case, Dr. Victor A. McKusick, 75, can't seem to retire or even slow down after a long career at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
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HEALTH
November 3, 1997 | FRANK D. ROYLANCE, BALTIMORE SUN
Maybe it was discipline imposed by cold early mornings and the cows waiting impatiently in his father's dairy barn in Maine. Or maybe it is just genetic. In either case, Dr. Victor A. McKusick, 75, can't seem to retire or even slow down after a long career at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
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NEWS
November 25, 1991 | Associated Press
Doctors are searching for answers to a mysterious heart ailment that has killed six members of a local family who were young and appeared to be in good health. The first to die was Francisco Martinez Santos, a 34-year-old father of seven stricken by a heart attack in his Milpitas home in 1960, four days after a physical exam found him to be in excellent health. In 1981, his 27-year-old daughter, Doris, died in her sleep.
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Scientists said Wednesday that they have drawn a detailed "map" that promises to speed the hunt for genes that cause cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure and mental disorders. The genetic map, a first of its kind, consists of more than 400 "marker" genes spaced at regular intervals along the 23 pairs of chromosomes that contain a person's 100,000 genes. These markers act like street signs, allowing scientists to tell on which chromosome a disease gene lies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Victor A. McKusick, the Johns Hopkins University physician who is widely regarded as the father of medical genetics, died Tuesday at his home in Baltimore. He was 86 and died of complications from cancer. McKusick was a pioneer in linking diseases to specific genes and began the first database of gene functions, a repository that now includes more than 18,000 human genes.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | CATHERINE ARNST, Reuters
Science fiction has long been filled with chilling scenarios of the future in which evil leaders try to engineer a master race of genetically perfect human beings. The tools to accomplish such a feat are slowly moving out of the realm of fiction, however, as geneticists around the world struggle to identify and decode all of the genes contained in the human body. At the same time they must struggle with the ethical questions that have always surrounded the science of genetics, but their efforts in that area may be moot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Dr. David L. Rimoin, a medical geneticist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center who pioneered studies of dwarfism and other skeletal abnormalities, died Sunday at the Los Angeles hospital. He was 75 and had been diagnosed with advanced pancreatic cancer days earlier. Rimoin was also among the first to recognize that diabetes is caused by a variety of genetic abnormalities and he played an influential role in establishing screening programs for Tay-Sachs disease. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this obituary said Dr. David L. Rimoin recruited Dr. Michael M. Kaback to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in 1970.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Two teams of researchers have independently found the gene that causes Marfan syndrome, a potentially fatal disorder that affects one in 10,000 people worldwide and perhaps as many as 40,000 Americans. The disorder involves the connective tissue that holds together skin, muscles and organs and is characterized by impaired vision, weakened arteries, a lanky appearance and enlarged hands and feet--the latter traits often being found in athletes.
HEALTH
September 10, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL
The other day (you know, just during the normal flow of conversation) my mom informed me that her saliva is highly unusual. Back in college, she reminisced, she did this experiment that involved spitting into a tube then testing (using a chemical color change) to see if her spit could turn starch into sugar. Normal spit can: It contains an enzyme (amylase) that begins the digestion of starch way up in our mouths.
NEWS
February 12, 1988 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
A panel of the National Academy of Sciences on Thursday urged the federal government to launch history's most ambitious biological research project, a $3-billion effort over the next 15 years to map the location of every gene on the chromosomes in living cells that carry the human genetic blueprint.
HEALTH
July 23, 2001 | JUDY FOREMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For years, many prospective parents--and doctors, as well--have blithely assumed that if birth defects occur when an older couple has a baby, it's most likely because of the woman's advancing age. And there's some truth to this. The risk of mental retardation because of Down syndrome, for instance, clearly rises with advancing maternal age--from one in 1,000 at age 29 to one in 100 births at age 40.
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