Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVictor Navasky
IN THE NEWS

Victor Navasky

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
July 5, 2004 | Victor Navasky, Victor Navasky is publisher and editorial director of the Nation and the author of, among other books, "Naming Names," a history of the Hollywood blacklist. He is the director of the Delacorte Center for Magazine Journalism at Columbia University.
"Dad, quick, turn on Channel 4," said my daughter Miri, who hung up before I could ask her why. Here was why. There on Channel 4 was a commercial for "The Terminal," the new Tom Hanks movie. A voice-over explained that "Viktor Navorski," played by Hanks, finds himself stranded at the airport when a coup in Krakozhia, his imaginary Eastern European homeland, leaves him without a valid passport or visa. As a result he can't enter the United States and has no country to go back to.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
July 10, 2005 | James D. Squires, James D. Squires is the former editor of the Chicago Tribune and the author of "Read All About It! The Corporate Takeover of America's Newspapers."
Having lived nearly three-quarters of a century, Victor S. Navasky has held strong opinions for a long time. More significant, having begun his editing career in college with the Phoenix at Swarthmore and the Monocle at Yale, he has been perpetually in a position to express them in a voice that resonated in high places. He has worked for the New York Times, written for virtually every important American publication and taught at Princeton, Harvard and Columbia.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 28, 1990 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dark-haired young man in a striped shirt has been stalking Victor Navasky, editor of the scrappy, left-wing magazine known as the Nation. At the moment, the two men are in the belly of the publishing beast, the grimy white warren of office space on lower Fifth Avenue where America's oldest weekly does its provocative thing. Everywhere there are bare bulbs, teeny offices, a sink, a refrigerator, mountains of file cabinets, and shelves and shelves of books, books and more books.
OPINION
July 5, 2004 | Victor Navasky, Victor Navasky is publisher and editorial director of the Nation and the author of, among other books, "Naming Names," a history of the Hollywood blacklist. He is the director of the Delacorte Center for Magazine Journalism at Columbia University.
"Dad, quick, turn on Channel 4," said my daughter Miri, who hung up before I could ask her why. Here was why. There on Channel 4 was a commercial for "The Terminal," the new Tom Hanks movie. A voice-over explained that "Viktor Navorski," played by Hanks, finds himself stranded at the airport when a coup in Krakozhia, his imaginary Eastern European homeland, leaves him without a valid passport or visa. As a result he can't enter the United States and has no country to go back to.
BOOKS
July 10, 2005 | James D. Squires, James D. Squires is the former editor of the Chicago Tribune and the author of "Read All About It! The Corporate Takeover of America's Newspapers."
Having lived nearly three-quarters of a century, Victor S. Navasky has held strong opinions for a long time. More significant, having begun his editing career in college with the Phoenix at Swarthmore and the Monocle at Yale, he has been perpetually in a position to express them in a voice that resonated in high places. He has worked for the New York Times, written for virtually every important American publication and taught at Princeton, Harvard and Columbia.
SPORTS
January 17, 1999
Surprising early statements made about six baseball greats: Babe Ruth "Mistake to stop pitching" (Tris Speaker) Jackie Robinson "Can't hit inside pitch" (Bob Feller) Sandy Koufax "Don't sign him" (Branch Rickey Jr.) Willie Mays "So-so center fielder" (New York Daily News) Phil Rizzuto "Too small" to play (Casey Stengel) Tom Seaver "He won't make it" (Cubs scout) Source: "The Experts Speak" (Christopher Cerf and Victor Navasky, Pantheon Books, 1998)
NEWS
January 14, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Nation, the country's oldest weekly magazine, has been sold to a group of investors that includes actor Paul Newman, novelist E.L. Doctorow and the previous editor, Victor Navasky. The magazine will be overhauled, with more writers, an on-line computer service of political dialogue and possibly a new look, Navasky said. It has lost money most of the time since it began in 1865.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1985
The liberal weekly magazine was sold for an undisclosed sum, the publication reported. The Nation Co. is headed by two of the previous owners and Connecticut millionaire publisher Arthur Carter. Editor Victor Navasky said the change in ownership should result in better funding for the financially troubled publication and will eventually enable it to increase the number of investigative articles that it publishes.
BOOKS
July 7, 1991
"To be fair," says Jack Beatty in his review of "A Question of Character" by Thomas C. Reeves, J. Edgar Hoover "claimed that the wiretapping of (Martin Luther) King had been Robert Kennedy's idea." To be really fair, we must remind ourselves that the wiretapping was Hoover's idea, and that it took him from Jan. 8, 1961, to Oct. 10, 1963, to finally persuade a reluctant Robert Kennedy to sign Hoover's request for permission to initiate the taps. Further, we might remind ourselves that two of the three men Hoover hated "most in the world" were Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | PAUL D. COLFORD, NEWSDAY
The end of an era has come into view at the Nation, the country's leading magazine of liberal opinion, as Victor Navasky prepares to join the staff of Columbia University after 20 years as the weekly's guiding light. Navasky, 66, says he has agreed to become director of Columbia's George T. Delacorte Center for Magazine Journalism in January and will run the center as he works to phase himself out as the Nation's publisher and editorial director.
NEWS
December 28, 1990 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dark-haired young man in a striped shirt has been stalking Victor Navasky, editor of the scrappy, left-wing magazine known as the Nation. At the moment, the two men are in the belly of the publishing beast, the grimy white warren of office space on lower Fifth Avenue where America's oldest weekly does its provocative thing. Everywhere there are bare bulbs, teeny offices, a sink, a refrigerator, mountains of file cabinets, and shelves and shelves of books, books and more books.
BOOKS
March 31, 1996
The first Los Angeles Times Festival of Books will be held April 20 and 21 at UCLA's Dickson Plaza. Admission is free; parking at UCLA is $5. Among the more than 40 author events are the following: "Whose Life Is It Anyway? The Art and Craft of Biography" with A.
BOOKS
July 24, 2005
Liberalism's failure to be heard is due not to corporate ownership but to elitist views like those expressed by James D. Squires in his review of "A Matter of Opinion" by Victor S. Navasky [Book Review, July 10]. As long as liberals continue to characterize those who disagree with them with words like "moronization," blame their impotence on "the dominance of multinational corporations" (as opposed to multinational anti-democratic, anti-capitalist movements?) and believe that politicians need journals of opinion to "know what to think or say," they will continue their self-marginalization.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|