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Victor Nguyen

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BUSINESS
February 22, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two men were strangers in Vietnam. By coincidence, Nguyen Viet and Ho Thanh Viet escaped from Saigon on the day it fell, April 30, 1975. Along with thousands of other South Vietnamese, they fled the Communist takeover aboard U.S. Navy ships. Both men eventually made their way to the United States, where they sought to carve out a new existence in an unfamiliar land by learning to program computers.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two men were strangers in Vietnam. By coincidence, Nguyen Viet and Ho Thanh Viet escaped from Saigon on the day it fell, April 30, 1975. Along with thousands of other South Vietnamese, they fled the Communist takeover aboard U.S. Navy ships. Both men eventually made their way to the United States, where they sought to carve out a new existence in an unfamiliar land by learning to program computers.
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BUSINESS
June 16, 1989 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
For employees of Nguoi Viet, the major Vietnamese-language newspaper in Orange County, putting out an edition was real drudgery before Victor Nguyen came along. Writing stories wasn't the problem; typesetting was. And the Vietnamese language--with its flurry of accents over nearly every word--was at the heart of the difficulty. Until recently, there was no computer software to handle the complexities of Vietnamese. So Nguoi Viet employees had to type stories into the computer without the accents, print out a master copy of each story and advertisement and fill in the accent marks by hand before the paper went to press.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two men were strangers in Vietnam. By coincidence, Nguyen Viet and Ho Thanh Viet both escaped from Saigon on the day it fell, April 30, 1975. Along with thousands of other South Vietnamese, they fled the Communist takeover aboard U.S. Navy ships. Though they filtered through different refugee camps, both men eventually made their way to the United States, where each sought to carve out a new existence in an unfamiliar land by learning to program computers.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two men were strangers in Vietnam. By coincidence, Nguyen Viet and Ho Thanh Viet both escaped from Saigon on the day it fell, April 30, 1975. Along with thousands of other South Vietnamese, they fled the Communist takeover aboard U.S. Navy ships. Though they filtered through different refugee camps, both men eventually made their way to the United States, where each sought to carve out a new existence in an unfamiliar land by learning to program computers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1991
A Santa Ana man was arrested Monday on suspicion of fatally shooting a man two months ago outside a popular Vietnamese restaurant, police said. Victor Tuan Nguyen, 31, was booked into Orange County Jail on suspicion of murder. He was being held in lieu of $250,000 bail in connection with the Nov. 15 shooting death of Thanh Chi Nguyen, 26, of Anaheim. The two men were not related.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2011 | By Katherine Tulich, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This weekend is party time and not just because it's Super Bowl weekend. For Southern California's many Asian communities, it's the annual celebration of the Lunar New Year. While L.A.'s Chinatown has long been the focus of New Year celebrations, newer Asian communities are also forging their identities with their own unique celebrations. For the Vietnamese community, it's the Year of the Cat (the Chinese are celebrating the Year of the Rabbit), and in Garden Grove the Vietnamese community will hold its annual three-day Tet festival (full name, Tet Nguyen Dan, which translates to "Feast of the First Morning")
MAGAZINE
February 19, 2006 | Andrew Vontz, Andrew Vontz writes for Outside and Rolling Stone.
The future of Vietnamese music lives more than 7,000 miles from Hanoi. His name is Chosen 1, and he doesn't speak Vietnamese. When he's ready to record, the 22-year-old rapper heads to Orange County.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2008 | Cyndia Zwahlen, Special to The Times
Boogaloos in downtown Fullerton is a cheerful place where youngsters can sit in colorful mini-airplanes to get their locks trimmed, take the stage in the photography studio or star in a pirate or princess birthday party. The numbers behind the 17-month-old business aren't so upbeat. Monthly bills for the 4,000-square-foot site add up to about $12,500. Monthly income averages about $10,700. Owners Dianne and Victor Nguyen have used most of their $150,000 in start-up money to remodel and cover the monthly deficits.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2013 | By Don Lee and Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
President Obama's new proposal to set a higher floor for wages faces an uphill battle in Congress - and the fight may well boil down to a matter of timing. Obama, in his State of the Union address, called for increasing the minimum wage to $9 an hour from $7.25 in gradual stages by 2015. He said it was aimed at lifting families above the poverty line and putting more money in the pockets of consumers, which would end up helping companies. While unions and labor advocates praised the proposal, Republican leaders and business groups immediately lined up against it, calling it an anti-jobs idea.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1989 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
For employees of Nguoi Viet, the major Vietnamese-language newspaper in Orange County, putting out an edition was real drudgery before Victor Nguyen came along. Writing stories wasn't the problem; typesetting was. And the Vietnamese language--with its flurry of accents over nearly every word--was at the heart of the difficulty. Until recently, there was no computer software to handle the complexities of Vietnamese. So Nguoi Viet employees had to type stories into the computer without the accents, print out a master copy of each story and advertisement and fill in the accent marks by hand before the paper went to press.
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