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Victor Nunez

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
A disappointing conclusion to his Florida panhandle trilogy, Victor Nunez's "Coastlines" is a skeeter noir bogged down in the unconvincing pulp of a melodrama without conviction. Its late arrival in theaters, more than four years after debuting at Sundance, only compounds the letdown. Unlike "Ruby in Paradise" and "Ulee's Gold," with their well-drawn, plain-folk characters, "Coastlines" is populated by ciphers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
A disappointing conclusion to his Florida panhandle trilogy, Victor Nunez's "Coastlines" is a skeeter noir bogged down in the unconvincing pulp of a melodrama without conviction. Its late arrival in theaters, more than four years after debuting at Sundance, only compounds the letdown. Unlike "Ruby in Paradise" and "Ulee's Gold," with their well-drawn, plain-folk characters, "Coastlines" is populated by ciphers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Never mind that their films aren't in competition, that their names won't be mentioned when the Sundance Film Festival hands out its make-or-break awards. From different ends of the experience continuum, writer-directors Victor Nun~ez and Julie Davis are emblematic of both the struggles and the successes of independent filmmaking, and their presence here reaffirms why this event, the strains of its ever-increasing celebrity notwithstanding, continues to matter.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | Kevin Thomas
This 1993 release, from filmmaker Victor Nunez, is an intimate, low-key film as endearing and staunch as its heroine. A warm, perceptive depiction of everyday life, "Ruby" illuminates the inner being of a seemingly ordinary young woman in the process of creating a life for herself. It reveals the courage it takes to strike out on one's own and take charge of one's destiny. It marks the screen debut of Ashley Judd (pictured with Todd Field) (Bravo Sunday at 9 a.m. and 7:05 p.m.)
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | Kevin Thomas
This 1993 release, from filmmaker Victor Nunez, is an intimate, low-key film as endearing and staunch as its heroine. A warm, perceptive depiction of everyday life, "Ruby" illuminates the inner being of a seemingly ordinary young woman in the process of creating a life for herself. It reveals the courage it takes to strike out on one's own and take charge of one's destiny. It marks the screen debut of Ashley Judd (pictured with Todd Field) (Bravo Sunday at 9 a.m. and 7:05 p.m.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1991
A 60-year-old woman charged with murdering her husband, a retired San Diego State University professor, pleaded not guilty Thursday, and her bail was set at $500,000. Lisa Marie Herrmann of San Diego is charged in the fatal shooting of her husband, Hubert Herrmann, 61, who was found in the bathroom of the couple's home in Paradise Hills on Tuesday. Lisa Herrmann appeared before San Diego Municipal Judge Howard Shore. Deputy Dist. tty.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | Kenneth Turan
An unadorned and unexpectedly moving look at personal redemption and the resilience of family, this outstanding 1997 film stands out for its sureness, its quiet emotional force and writer-director Victor Nunez's ability to find and nurture the mystery and power in the events of an ordinary life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1992
The district attorney's office Tuesday did not formally charge a gang member with killing an 18-year-old woman, but he will remain in custody for allegedly violating his probation, authorities said. Wardell Monroe Campbell Jr., 19, is suspected of throwing a rock Friday that killed Monica Chapa of El Cajon, who had gotten off the San Diego Trolley in Logan Heights to use a restroom. Deputy Dist. Atty. Victor Nunez said he expects murder charges to be filed against Campbell within a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Never mind that their films aren't in competition, that their names won't be mentioned when the Sundance Film Festival hands out its make-or-break awards. From different ends of the experience continuum, writer-directors Victor Nun~ez and Julie Davis are emblematic of both the struggles and the successes of independent filmmaking, and their presence here reaffirms why this event, the strains of its ever-increasing celebrity notwithstanding, continues to matter.
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