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Victor Paz Estenssoro

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Victor Paz Estenssoro, four-time president of Bolivia and considered one of its most influential politicians, died Thursday after surgery to amputate a leg, doctors said. He was 93. Doctors operated to repair a blood clot in his right leg, said Guillermo Justiniano, a leader of Paz Estenssoro's National Revolutionary Movement. He said they amputated the leg at the knee when the clot couldn't be remedied.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Victor Paz Estenssoro, four-time president of Bolivia and considered one of its most influential politicians, died Thursday after surgery to amputate a leg, doctors said. He was 93. Doctors operated to repair a blood clot in his right leg, said Guillermo Justiniano, a leader of Paz Estenssoro's National Revolutionary Movement. He said they amputated the leg at the knee when the clot couldn't be remedied.
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NEWS
August 6, 1985
Victor Paz Estenssoro, the old-guard leader of Bolivia's nationalist revolution, won election for the fourth time as president and will take office today. His main opponent, Hugo Banzer, a conservative former military president who topped Paz in last month's popular election, telephoned the new president to wish him well. Banzer also announced that he will lead a "loyal opposition."
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Jaime Paz Zamora, a longtime crusader for leftist causes, took office Sunday as president of Bolivia and promised a distinctly conservative economic policy for this impoverished South American country. Paz Zamora, 50, pledged in his inauguration speech to preserve monetary and financial stability, promote private industry, respect the laws of supply and demand and reduce the size of the government.
NEWS
July 16, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
Former President Hugo Banzer, a conservative candidate for the Bolivian presidency, claimed victory Monday even though his substantial lead in unofficial returns from Sunday's general election was apparently not enough to avoid a runoff contest in Congress. "We hope that this victory will be respected whatever the difference in the number of votes because we were always prepared to recognize those who won the most votes," he said. With about a third of the 1.
NEWS
August 3, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
With two rival candidates claiming the right to be elected president, the Bolivian armed forces said Friday that they would accept the decision to be made Sunday by Congress in a runoff election. The announcement in a communique by the military high command came as the national electoral court was hearing charges that ballot boxes involving as many as 100,000 votes in the department of La Paz had not been included in final returns.
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Jaime Paz Zamora, a longtime crusader for leftist causes, took office Sunday as president of Bolivia and promised a distinctly conservative economic policy for this impoverished South American country. Paz Zamora, 50, pledged in his inauguration speech to preserve monetary and financial stability, promote private industry, respect the laws of supply and demand and reduce the size of the government.
NEWS
May 7, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
A hunger strike against government austerity policies has spread through Bolivia in recent days as thousands have joined the protest fast, part of a restive climate that Pope John Paul II will encounter when he visits here next week. Although critics have questioned the hunger strikers' commitment, some accusing them of snacking on the sly, few Bolivians question the truth of their basic complaint: the "social cost" of official economic policy is painfully high.
NEWS
August 11, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
When a Latin American ambassador asked Victor Paz Estenssoro how he would pay Bolivia's foreign debt and halt runaway inflation, Bolivia's new president replied, "With optimism, because we don't have any other resource." If there is one thing that Paz has shown consistently during his 50 stormy years in politics, it is optimism. His career has gone from heady heights of revolutionary power and national adulation to the depths of political defeat and exile.
NEWS
May 7, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
A hunger strike against government austerity policies has spread through Bolivia in recent days as thousands have joined the protest fast, part of a restive climate that Pope John Paul II will encounter when he visits here next week. Although critics have questioned the hunger strikers' commitment, some accusing them of snacking on the sly, few Bolivians question the truth of their basic complaint: the "social cost" of official economic policy is painfully high.
NEWS
August 11, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
When a Latin American ambassador asked Victor Paz Estenssoro how he would pay Bolivia's foreign debt and halt runaway inflation, Bolivia's new president replied, "With optimism, because we don't have any other resource." If there is one thing that Paz has shown consistently during his 50 stormy years in politics, it is optimism. His career has gone from heady heights of revolutionary power and national adulation to the depths of political defeat and exile.
NEWS
August 6, 1985
Victor Paz Estenssoro, the old-guard leader of Bolivia's nationalist revolution, won election for the fourth time as president and will take office today. His main opponent, Hugo Banzer, a conservative former military president who topped Paz in last month's popular election, telephoned the new president to wish him well. Banzer also announced that he will lead a "loyal opposition."
NEWS
August 3, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
With two rival candidates claiming the right to be elected president, the Bolivian armed forces said Friday that they would accept the decision to be made Sunday by Congress in a runoff election. The announcement in a communique by the military high command came as the national electoral court was hearing charges that ballot boxes involving as many as 100,000 votes in the department of La Paz had not been included in final returns.
NEWS
July 16, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
Former President Hugo Banzer, a conservative candidate for the Bolivian presidency, claimed victory Monday even though his substantial lead in unofficial returns from Sunday's general election was apparently not enough to avoid a runoff contest in Congress. "We hope that this victory will be respected whatever the difference in the number of votes because we were always prepared to recognize those who won the most votes," he said. With about a third of the 1.
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