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Victor Reuther

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Victor Reuther, who along with his brothers, Walter and Roy, helped make the United Auto Workers union a powerful force in the American labor movement and led mid-20th century development of all industrial unions, has died. He was 92. Reuther, who had been living in a hospice in the Washington, D.C., area, died Thursday of renal failure and pneumonia at George Washington University Hospital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Victor Reuther, who along with his brothers, Walter and Roy, helped make the United Auto Workers union a powerful force in the American labor movement and led mid-20th century development of all industrial unions, has died. He was 92. Reuther, who had been living in a hospice in the Washington, D.C., area, died Thursday of renal failure and pneumonia at George Washington University Hospital.
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BUSINESS
January 17, 1989 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
A disturbing counterrevolution is being mounted in the United Auto Workers against the union's drive toward industrial democracy. After 54 years as a leading force in the UAW, Victor Reuther is now a furious leader of the battle against the union's cautious acceptance of a plan that gives rank-and-file workers a significant voice in making decisions about the way their companies are run. Reuther, 77, the retired brother of the late UAW founder Walter Reuther, is not alone.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
A loose-knit group of dissidents within the United Auto Workers, angered by the union's increasing cooperation with auto industry management, is considering forming an organized opposition union caucus that would operate independently of the UAW's current hierarchy. The dissident group, called New Directions, may use the union's national convention beginning Sunday at the Anaheim Convention Center as the forum for announcing a more structured opposition inside the UAW--an organization that would have its own staff and even collect dues from willing members.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
A loose-knit group of dissidents within the United Auto Workers, angered by the union's increasing cooperation with auto industry management, is considering forming an organized opposition union caucus that would operate independently of the UAW's current hierarchy. The dissident group, called New Directions, may use the union's national convention beginning Sunday at the Anaheim Convention Center as the forum for announcing a more structured opposition inside the UAW--an organization that would have its own staff and even collect dues from willing members.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
A loose-knit group of dissidents within the United Auto Workers, angered by the union's increasing cooperation with auto industry management, is considering forming an organized opposition union caucus that would operate independently of the UAW's current hierarchy. The dissident group, called New Directions, may use the union's national convention beginning Sunday at the Anaheim Convention Center as the forum for announcing a more structured opposition inside the UAW--an organization that would have its own staff and even collect dues from willing members.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1989
In a rare move, five major figures in the United Auto Workers today publicly blasted a founder of the labor union for his recent charges that UAW leaders have given up hard-won gains and are cozying up to the management of U.S. auto makers. Former UAW presidents Douglas Fraser and Leonard Woodcock and union vice presidents Ken Bannon, Pat Greathouse and Irving Bluestone, released a document titled, "An Open Response to Victor Reuther." Reuther was one of the UAW's early leading figures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Dorothy Kemp Roosevelt, a sister-in-law of Eleanor Roosevelt and the first woman ever to win a Democratic congressional primary in Michigan, died Sunday in her suburban Detroit home, family members said. She was 86. Mrs. Roosevelt was married to the late G. Hall Roosevelt, a Detroit banker and brother of Eleanor Roosevelt and nephew of Theodore Roosevelt. They were divorced in 1937.
BOOKS
April 11, 1993 | Harry Bernstein, Bernstein has been a labor writer and columnist for The Times for 30 years.
No other union in the world has ever been investigated, damned and praised as much as the Teamsters. More than a dozen books have been written about it. Television and theatrical films have dramatized its sometimes sordid history, the murder of one of its presidents, James R. Hoffa, and the imprisonment of hundreds of its other leaders, including several of its presidents.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian leaders, alarmed that their nation has slipped so drastically behind the West, throw open the doors to foreign consultants. Sound familiar? Actually, the 1980s surge in East-West business ties is a footnote to a much larger--if little-known--story of how Americans helped build the modern Soviet Union before the Cold War, setting up steel mills, auto plants, machine factories, the very basis of its military-industrial might.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
A loose-knit group of dissidents within the United Auto Workers, angered by the union's increasing cooperation with auto industry management, is considering forming an organized opposition union caucus that would operate independently of the UAW's current hierarchy. The dissident group, called New Directions, may use the union's national convention beginning Sunday at the Anaheim Convention Center as the forum for announcing a more structured opposition inside the UAW--an organization that would have its own staff and even collect dues from willing members.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1989
In a rare move, five major figures in the United Auto Workers today publicly blasted a founder of the labor union for his recent charges that UAW leaders have given up hard-won gains and are cozying up to the management of U.S. auto makers. Former UAW presidents Douglas Fraser and Leonard Woodcock and union vice presidents Ken Bannon, Pat Greathouse and Irving Bluestone, released a document titled, "An Open Response to Victor Reuther." Reuther was one of the UAW's early leading figures.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1989 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
A disturbing counterrevolution is being mounted in the United Auto Workers against the union's drive toward industrial democracy. After 54 years as a leading force in the UAW, Victor Reuther is now a furious leader of the battle against the union's cautious acceptance of a plan that gives rank-and-file workers a significant voice in making decisions about the way their companies are run. Reuther, 77, the retired brother of the late UAW founder Walter Reuther, is not alone.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1986 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The National Labor Relations Board on Monday dismissed unfair labor practice charges filed against General Motors and the United Auto Workers by the National Right to Work Legal Defense Fund, which had challenged the legality of the union's labor agreement with GM for the yet-to-be-built Saturn auto plant in Spring Hill, Tenn.
NEWS
January 4, 1987 | DAVID GOODMAN, Associated Press
Assembly-line conditions begged for correction: filth, noise, prostrating heat, the dreaded speedup, all made more grim by a company attitude that one manager expressed this way: "We hire you from the head down." But in the auto-making plants of 50 years ago, management could virtually ignore the weak United Auto Workers, a fledgling union that claimed scarcely 5.4% of the workers.
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