Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVictor Voth
IN THE NEWS

Victor Voth

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1992 | LEN HALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Victor Voth speaks, the strawberry industry listens. It is that way the world over because Voth, 71, is the acknowledged guru of strawberries. During his 40 years studying the tasty fruit at the University of California South Coast Research and Extension Center in Irvine, Voth has developed more than 20 different marketable strains.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
March 23, 2012 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Oh, strawberries don't taste as they used to," wrote John Steinbeck in "East of Eden. " Never mind that the chapter was set a century ago; many foodies believe that industrial varieties and practices have degraded the flavor of modern strawberries. This spring we have an opportunity to test that hypothesis, as Harry's Berries has resumed growing the Chandler variety, a longtime favorite at farmers markets for its tender, juicy flesh and classic strawberry flavor. "It reminds me of what strawberries used to taste like when I was a kid," says Kris Gean, 32, scion of the Harry's Berries dynasty.
Advertisement
FOOD
March 23, 2012 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Oh, strawberries don't taste as they used to," wrote John Steinbeck in "East of Eden. " Never mind that the chapter was set a century ago; many foodies believe that industrial varieties and practices have degraded the flavor of modern strawberries. This spring we have an opportunity to test that hypothesis, as Harry's Berries has resumed growing the Chandler variety, a longtime favorite at farmers markets for its tender, juicy flesh and classic strawberry flavor. "It reminds me of what strawberries used to taste like when I was a kid," says Kris Gean, 32, scion of the Harry's Berries dynasty.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | LEN HALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Victor Voth speaks, the strawberry industry listens. It's that way the world over. Voth, 71, is the acknowledged guru of strawberry research. During his 40 years studying the tasty fruit at the University of California South Coast Research and Extension Center in Irvine, Voth has developed more than 20 marketable strains.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | LEN HALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Victor Voth speaks, the strawberry industry listens. It's that way the world over. Voth, 71, is the acknowledged guru of strawberry research. During his 40 years studying the tasty fruit at the University of California South Coast Research and Extension Center in Irvine, Voth has developed more than 20 marketable strains.
MAGAZINE
December 8, 1985 | BILL SIDNAM, Bill Sidnam has been a Times garden writer since 1975
William Butler, a 16th-Century English physician, had this to say about the strawberry: "Doubtless God could have made a better berry, but doubtless God never did." Since we in Southern California live in the world's prime commercial strawberry belt, it would be a shame if we didn't devote some space in our gardens to this glorious berry. Although commercial growers plant strawberries in late October and November, not many plants are available to the home gardener during those months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1991 | LEN HALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Entomologist Blair Bailey broke a Valencia orange off its branch Tuesday morning and pointed to the California citrus industry's most dangerous pest. "That's the California red scale," said Bailey, pointing to a tiny red insect resembling a worm in a groove on the orange's skin. "They spread by just blowing in the wind, although the males actually have wings. A citrus farmer can spend a lot of money trying to control them."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1995 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An angry Mother Nature is spoiling much of Orange County's strawberry crop just as the fruit begins to bloom, hurting some farmers and boosting wholesale prices about 25% above normal for this time of year, according to agriculture officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1994 | E.J. GONG JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fruit scientist extraordinaire Kirk D. Larson perched himself atop a wooden stool in a furrowed field of stubby, green plants. Then he lifted up a plump, red fruit, studied it keenly, and offered some wisdom about his quest to create the "super strawberry." For Larson, 40, it is the ultimate challenge. "Breeding strawberries is like breeding thoroughbred racehorses," Larson said. "It's all in the bloodlines. You try to mate high-quality, high-performance plants with each other.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1992 | LEN HALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Victor Voth speaks, the strawberry industry listens. It is that way the world over because Voth, 71, is the acknowledged guru of strawberries. During his 40 years studying the tasty fruit at the University of California South Coast Research and Extension Center in Irvine, Voth has developed more than 20 different marketable strains.
MAGAZINE
December 8, 1985 | BILL SIDNAM, Bill Sidnam has been a Times garden writer since 1975
William Butler, a 16th-Century English physician, had this to say about the strawberry: "Doubtless God could have made a better berry, but doubtless God never did." Since we in Southern California live in the world's prime commercial strawberry belt, it would be a shame if we didn't devote some space in our gardens to this glorious berry. Although commercial growers plant strawberries in late October and November, not many plants are available to the home gardener during those months.
NEWS
April 16, 1994 | E.J. GONG JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fruit scientist extraordinaire Kirk D. Larson, Ph.D, perched himself atop a wooden stool in a furrowed field of stubby, green plants. Then he lifted up a plump, red fruit, studied it keenly, and offered some wisdom about his quest to create the "super strawberry." For Larson, 40, it is the ultimate challenge. "Breeding strawberries is like breeding Thoroughbred racehorses," Larson said. "It's all in the bloodlines. You try to mate high-quality, high-performance plants with each other.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cuesta strawberry, known until recently as C-202, is sharply sweet on first bite, then becomes tart. The Camarosa, formerly variety C-25, has no taste for the first instant. But when chewed, it bursts into a sharp, sweet flavor with a hint of sour aftertaste. By contrast, the variety of strawberry Southern Californians find most often at the market--the Chandler--tastes familiar, even ordinary.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|