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Victoria Ann Lewis

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | NANCY CHURNIN, Nancy Churnin is frequent contributor to Calendar
When Victoria Ann-Lewis got the call from her agent telling her that San Diego's Old Globe Theatre wanted to audition her for a lead in a new play called "Light Sensitive," she was elated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1993
My husband and I saw "Light Sensitive" recently, and we agreed that not only was it a superbly written play, but the acting was outstanding, particularly that of Victoria Ann-Lewis, who brought such vitality onto the stage that it might as well have been lit with her own energy ("Seeing the 'Light,' " by Nancy Churnin, Feb. 21). Interestingly enough, I did not know, until my husband mentioned it at the intermission, that Ann-Lewis limped or evidenced any disability whatsoever. Perhaps now she'll be more recognized for what she is: a very strong actress.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1993
My husband and I saw "Light Sensitive" recently, and we agreed that not only was it a superbly written play, but the acting was outstanding, particularly that of Victoria Ann-Lewis, who brought such vitality onto the stage that it might as well have been lit with her own energy ("Seeing the 'Light,' " by Nancy Churnin, Feb. 21). Interestingly enough, I did not know, until my husband mentioned it at the intermission, that Ann-Lewis limped or evidenced any disability whatsoever. Perhaps now she'll be more recognized for what she is: a very strong actress.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | NANCY CHURNIN, Nancy Churnin is frequent contributor to Calendar
When Victoria Ann-Lewis got the call from her agent telling her that San Diego's Old Globe Theatre wanted to audition her for a lead in a new play called "Light Sensitive," she was elated.
NEWS
July 31, 1986
More than 30 of the nation's top artists and administrators from innovative art teaching programs in alternative settings such as correctional institutions will meet for a UCLA Extension conference Aug. 21 through 23 at 147 Dodd Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1986 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
"Growing Pains," conceived and written by Victoria Ann Lewis and developed in a 12-week workshop, is loosely knit, uneven and performed for the most part by non-professionals--disabled adults and teen-agers. It isn't great theater. But it's more than therapy. It has moments--funny and moving--and for all its lightness, it makes a strong point. Presented Monday at the Mark Taper Forum Annex, the mixture of readings, music and humor is based on the life experiences of its cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1985 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Most of TV dwells on human exteriors. Perfect shapes. Perfect faces. Perfect smiles. Perfect teeth. Perfect skin. Perfect hair. Perfect voices. Perfectly boring. No wonder, then, that persons with disabilities have mostly been shut out of TV. And when not omitted, they have been depicted as freaks or stereotyped as either bitter or inhumanly inspirational. They were never just . . . people. Slowly, that is changing. Movies have helped.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Disabled people come in many different shapes, sizes, colors. They also come with a variety of voices. "The bottom line of 'Other Voices' is developing a disabled culture--in Los Angeles, all over the world," said actress Victoria Ann-Lewis, project director of the Other Voices Writing Workshop. The group will present a scene reading, open to the public, Monday at the Music Center Annex. "The disabled minority is not geographical, yet it's very repressed," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1992 | Aleene MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Anniversary Time "Out in Front," a weekend of theater, comedy, music, poetry and dance celebrating the Mark Taper Forum's 25th season, will take place on the Taper's stage Oct. 1-4. American Indian musician John Trudell and his Graffiti Man band and the Latino comedy troupe Culture Clash will perform each evening.
NEWS
October 1, 1987
Eleven women artists, scholars and supporters of the arts will be honored at the sixth annual Vesta Awards brunch Oct. 18 at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel. The event from noon to 3 p.m. pays tribute to women who have made significant contributions to the arts in Southern California. This year's award winners will be: Victoria Ann-Lewis, theater; Sheila Benson, journalism; Nancy Buchanan, performance art; Susan A. Grode, community support; Brenda A.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Disabled people come in many different shapes, sizes, colors. They also come with a variety of voices. "The bottom line of 'Other Voices' is developing a disabled culture--in Los Angeles, all over the world," said actress Victoria Ann-Lewis, project director of the Other Voices Writing Workshop. The group will present a scene reading, open to the public, Monday at the Music Center Annex. "The disabled minority is not geographical, yet it's very repressed," she said.
NEWS
July 31, 1986
More than 30 of the nation's top artists and administrators from innovative art teaching programs in alternative settings such as correctional institutions will meet for a UCLA Extension conference Aug. 21 through 23 at 147 Dodd Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1986 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
"Growing Pains," conceived and written by Victoria Ann Lewis and developed in a 12-week workshop, is loosely knit, uneven and performed for the most part by non-professionals--disabled adults and teen-agers. It isn't great theater. But it's more than therapy. It has moments--funny and moving--and for all its lightness, it makes a strong point. Presented Monday at the Mark Taper Forum Annex, the mixture of readings, music and humor is based on the life experiences of its cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1985 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Most of TV dwells on human exteriors. Perfect shapes. Perfect faces. Perfect smiles. Perfect teeth. Perfect skin. Perfect hair. Perfect voices. Perfectly boring. No wonder, then, that persons with disabilities have mostly been shut out of TV. And when not omitted, they have been depicted as freaks or stereotyped as either bitter or inhumanly inspirational. They were never just . . . people. Slowly, that is changing. Movies have helped.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1985 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Times Television Critic
"Who Parks in Those Spaces?" (7:30 tonight on KTTV Channel 11) is a warm, natural, honest, snappy and funny musical revue, a swell little half hour starring nine persons with disabilities. Yes, those people. This is a stereotype-smashing sequel to "Tell Them I'm a Mermaid," a 1983 special that won some awards, probably for effort, because creatively it wasn't much to get excited about. The Taper Media Enterprises production of "Who Parks in Those Spaces?" occupies another space entirely.
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