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Victoria Jackson

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NEWS
February 24, 1995 | JAMES E. FOWLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victoria Jackson has been described as a cross between Judy Holiday and Tiny Tim. A veteran of "Saturday Night Live" and a frequent "Tonight Show" guest, Jackson has created a dizzy blonde persona. Now she has recorded an album on which he sings and plays the ukulele. Jackson will give a mini-concert March 4 at Pages Bookstore in Tarzana. The album, "Ukulele Lady," is aimed at children, although the songs are not written especially for children but are 1930s pop standards.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2000
Following in the footsteps of such pros as Judy Holliday and Goldie Hawn, Victoria Jackson played the dizzy blond persona to perfection as a regular on "Saturday Night Live" (1986-92) and through starring roles in such films as "Casual Sex" (1988) and "Weird" Al Yankovic's "UHF" (1989). But the 41-year-old actor started out doing stand-up comedy. Her big break came with a "Tonight Show" performance in which she recited poetry while standing on her head.
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BUSINESS
February 28, 1995 | JENNIFER PENDLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Five years ago, Victoria Jackson, a onetime Bullock's cosmetics saleswoman, became a star overnight in one of those often-maligned TV commercials known as "infomercials." The makeup line she developed and started pitching on television, Victoria Jackson Cosmetics, has since generated $200 million in sales. Jackson was touted quickly in the press as an entrepreneur who rose from obscurity to clean up financially. But things aren't always what they seem.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1995 | JENNIFER PENDLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Five years ago, Victoria Jackson, a onetime Bullock's cosmetics saleswoman, became a star overnight in one of those often-maligned TV commercials known as "infomercials." The makeup line she developed and started pitching on television, Victoria Jackson Cosmetics, has since generated $200 million in sales. Jackson was touted quickly in the press as an entrepreneur who rose from obscurity to clean up financially. But things aren't always what they seem.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | From United Press International
'Saturday Night Live' Comedienne: "Saturday Night Live" regular Victoria Jackson was sued in Los Angeles Superior Court by Brillstein Co., which seeks more than $18,000. The breach-of-contract case claims that Jackson agreed in early 1987 to pay the company a 15% commission from employment obtained for her by the management firm, plus 15% on increases in her compensation. For the 1989-90 season, Jackson got a "substantial increase" in pay to $6,000 per episode for 20 shows, the suit says.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1995 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You may have never heard of Cosmetic Group USA. But you've probably run across their products. Or rather, their products probably have come to you. The Sun Valley company manufactures makeup for door-to-door marketing companies such as Avon Products and Mary Kay Cosmetics, and for infomercial cosmetics queen Victoria Jackson. Unlike Revlon or Maybelline, which make their own products, these other big names in the makeup industry focus on marketing cosmetics rather than actually producing them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2000
Following in the footsteps of such pros as Judy Holliday and Goldie Hawn, Victoria Jackson played the dizzy blond persona to perfection as a regular on "Saturday Night Live" (1986-92) and through starring roles in such films as "Casual Sex" (1988) and "Weird" Al Yankovic's "UHF" (1989). But the 41-year-old actor started out doing stand-up comedy. Her big break came with a "Tonight Show" performance in which she recited poetry while standing on her head.
MAGAZINE
April 12, 1992 | CRAIG FISHER
A lot of little girls like playing dress-up. But Victoria Jackson preferred playing with makeup. And not just her own. "I wanted to do other people's makeup," she recalls. "I didn't necessarily have the talent, but I knew there was something I wanted to express through makeup." Today, 30-odd years later, New York-born Jackson and her mail-order company, Victoria Jackson Cosmetics, may be the hottest things going in women's grooming.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wedged between those half-hour, late-night commercials for weight-loss tapes, updated Veg-O-Matics and instant piano proficiency, Lynn Redgrave is ready to be doctored up. In a remarkable departure for an actress, her face is stark naked. Her hair's a wreck. But hang on. In minutes, hotshot Hollywood makeup artist Michael Maron transforms Redgrave from extre-e-e-mely natural everywoman to camera-ready sex bomb. Flip the station and Ali MacGraw is not quite so revealing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Face it, teaching the tricks of the trade isn't easy. Not even if you are the queen of TV cosmetics commercials and you are surrounded by a captive audience. That is where mail-order makeup maven Victoria Jackson found herself Thursday when she visited a Los Angeles County women's jail to teach eyeliner and cheek blush techniques to inmates. The idea for the visit was to build self-esteem among prisoners.
NEWS
February 24, 1995 | JAMES E. FOWLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victoria Jackson has been described as a cross between Judy Holiday and Tiny Tim. A veteran of "Saturday Night Live" and a frequent "Tonight Show" guest, Jackson has created a dizzy blonde persona. Now she has recorded an album on which he sings and plays the ukulele. Jackson will give a mini-concert March 4 at Pages Bookstore in Tarzana. The album, "Ukulele Lady," is aimed at children, although the songs are not written especially for children but are 1930s pop standards.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1995 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You may have never heard of Cosmetic Group USA. But you've probably run across their products. Or rather, their products probably have come to you. The Sun Valley company manufactures makeup for door-to-door marketing companies such as Avon Products and Mary Kay Cosmetics, and for infomercial cosmetics queen Victoria Jackson. Unlike Revlon or Maybelline, which make their own products, these other big names in the makeup industry focus on marketing cosmetics rather than actually producing them.
MAGAZINE
April 12, 1992 | CRAIG FISHER
A lot of little girls like playing dress-up. But Victoria Jackson preferred playing with makeup. And not just her own. "I wanted to do other people's makeup," she recalls. "I didn't necessarily have the talent, but I knew there was something I wanted to express through makeup." Today, 30-odd years later, New York-born Jackson and her mail-order company, Victoria Jackson Cosmetics, may be the hottest things going in women's grooming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Face it, teaching the tricks of the trade isn't easy. Not even if you are the queen of TV cosmetics commercials and you are surrounded by a captive audience. That is where mail-order makeup maven Victoria Jackson found herself Thursday when she visited a Los Angeles County women's jail to teach eyeliner and cheek blush techniques to inmates. The idea for the visit was to build self-esteem among prisoners.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | From United Press International
'Saturday Night Live' Comedienne: "Saturday Night Live" regular Victoria Jackson was sued in Los Angeles Superior Court by Brillstein Co., which seeks more than $18,000. The breach-of-contract case claims that Jackson agreed in early 1987 to pay the company a 15% commission from employment obtained for her by the management firm, plus 15% on increases in her compensation. For the 1989-90 season, Jackson got a "substantial increase" in pay to $6,000 per episode for 20 shows, the suit says.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wedged between those half-hour, late-night commercials for weight-loss tapes, updated Veg-O-Matics and instant piano proficiency, Lynn Redgrave is ready to be doctored up. In a remarkable departure for an actress, her face is stark naked. Her hair's a wreck. But hang on. In minutes, hotshot Hollywood makeup artist Michael Maron transforms Redgrave from extre-e-e-mely natural everywoman to camera-ready sex bomb. Flip the station and Ali MacGraw is not quite so revealing.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1996
Cosmetic Group USA Inc., a Sun Valley makeup manufacturer, said it expects to post a $450,000 loss in the fourth quarter despite increasing sales. The company attributed the expected loss to costs related to the launch of its new hair-care products business. Cosmetic Group also said it plans to expand production of makeup by about 33% at the end of February in response to increased demand.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"Saturday Night Live" returns Oct. 17 with cast intact--for the first time since 1978, NBC announced Monday. The late-night show brought in an average 7.6 rating and 23 share of the viewing audience last season--its highest numbers since 1981, when Eddie Murphy led the cast. Not yet announced but already a done deal: Steve Martin will host the season premiere. The cast includes Dana Carvey, Nora Dunn, Phil Hartman, Jan Hooks, Victoria Jackson, Jon Lovitz, Dennis Miller, Kevin Nealon and A.
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