Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVictoria L Bradshaw
IN THE NEWS

Victoria L Bradshaw

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 3, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victoria L. Bradshaw--who as state labor commissioner cracked down on workplace abuses, including the alleged slave-labor garment factory in El Monte--has an employment problem of her own these days: She's out of work. In a case of bad timing, Bradshaw last week announced that she was resigning from her labor post to become executive director of Pro-Wilson 1996, an organization intended to drum up support among women, business owners and community leaders for Gov.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 3, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victoria L. Bradshaw--who as state labor commissioner cracked down on workplace abuses, including the alleged slave-labor garment factory in El Monte--has an employment problem of her own these days: She's out of work. In a case of bad timing, Bradshaw last week announced that she was resigning from her labor post to become executive director of Pro-Wilson 1996, an organization intended to drum up support among women, business owners and community leaders for Gov.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1994
While we are always appreciative of Robert Scheer's support of our multi-agency labor law enforcement program, we feel he overlooked several important issues in his article ("Instead of 187: Enforcement of Labor Laws," Column Left, Nov. 20). Scheer recognizes that the almost unrestricted flood of undocumented workers into California has left the state with significant labor law enforcement problems. He then chastises the governor for not using more state taxpayer dollars to rectify a problem created by the failure of the federal government to enforce the borders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1994
While we are always appreciative of Robert Scheer's support of our multi-agency labor law enforcement program, we feel he overlooked several important issues in his article ("Instead of 187: Enforcement of Labor Laws," Column Left, Nov. 20). Scheer recognizes that the almost unrestricted flood of undocumented workers into California has left the state with significant labor law enforcement problems. He then chastises the governor for not using more state taxpayer dollars to rectify a problem created by the failure of the federal government to enforce the borders.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former State Labor Chief Gets New Post: Gov. Pete Wilson this week appointed his former state labor commissioner, Victoria L. Bradshaw, as director of the state Employment Development Department, the agency that handles unemployment claims, keeps labor statistics and collects payroll taxes. Bradshaw, 46, was the first woman to serve as labor commissioner, from 1991 until September, 1995, when she resigned to head a group supporting Wilson's now-defunct presidential campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1996
A program for displaced workers that was almost displaced itself has been saved by a $500,000 state grant, officials said Thursday. The Long Beach Career Transition Center is now able to keep its doors open until June 30 and offer job training and career counseling to a new batch of students: a group of over 50 displaced workers, said Robert Johnson, administrator of the Long Beach Service Delivery Area.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1992 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A strike force of state and federal officials investigating farm labor abuses swept into Imperial County on Tuesday, assessing nearly $300,000 in fines and accusing six labor contractors of criminal charges of operating without a license. California Labor Commissioner Victoria L. Bradshaw, who helped oversee the raids, said the enforcement effort was prompted partly by concerns of growing abuses related to the downturn in farm hiring.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A strike force of state and federal investigators swept across the San Joaquin Valley on Tuesday in the start of what authorities called the state's largest-ever crackdown on violations of labor laws designed to protect farm workers. Hours before daybreak, about 60 investigators from the U.S. Department of Labor, the state labor commissioner's office, and a variety of other state and local agencies fanned out across the agriculture-rich region around Fresno.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2005 | Michael Hiltzik
No issue jerks the knees of Californians -- indeed, all Americans -- as much as illegal immigration and its effect on the state and the nation. One reason that it tends to elicit pre-programmed responses across the political spectrum is that the information available on the subject has traditionally been of two kinds: bad and nonexistent.
NEWS
March 10, 1996 | VIRGINIA ELLIS and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After six months of grass-roots organizing for Gov. Pete Wilson's presidential bid, Mitch Zak suddenly found himself out of work when the campaign fizzled last fall. But Wilson took care of him. Within weeks, Zak was installed as a special assistant to the state Fish and Game director. His new salary was 80% higher than his old one as a governor's office assistant--a job that he quit to stump for Wilson.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|