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Victoria Murden

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND and JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writers
Shirley Metz of Capistrano Beach and Victoria Murden, a Harvard divinity student, became the first women to reach the South Pole on an overland route Wednesday when they and eight men concluded a 750-mile trek across Antarctica that began Nov. 28. The group, consisting of U.S. and Canadian citizens, also became the first Americans on skis to reach the ceremonial barber pole at the U.S. Navy's Amundsen-Scott Research Center.
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SPORTS
December 10, 1999 | PETE THOMAS
Tori Murden finally said goodbye to Stella and Stanley, good riddance to Lenny and hello to civilization last Friday morning, after rowing ashore amid great fanfare at Pointe-a-Pitre, Guadeloupe, in the Lesser Antilles. Stella and Stanley were the two dolphinfish--called dorado or mahi-mahi in the Pacific--she befriended in the middle of the ocean. "They hung out beneath my boat for about a month," she says.
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SPORTS
December 10, 1999 | PETE THOMAS
Tori Murden finally said goodbye to Stella and Stanley, good riddance to Lenny and hello to civilization last Friday morning, after rowing ashore amid great fanfare at Pointe-a-Pitre, Guadeloupe, in the Lesser Antilles. Stella and Stanley were the two dolphinfish--called dorado or mahi-mahi in the Pacific--she befriended in the middle of the ocean. "They hung out beneath my boat for about a month," she says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND and JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writers
Shirley Metz of Capistrano Beach and Victoria Murden, a Harvard divinity student, became the first women to reach the South Pole on an overland route Wednesday when they and eight men concluded a 750-mile trek across Antarctica that began Nov. 28. The group, consisting of U.S. and Canadian citizens, also became the first Americans on skis to reach the ceremonial barber pole at the U.S. Navy's Amundsen-Scott Research Center.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | From Times wire services
Two Americans became the first women to reach the South Pole overland when they arrived with nine other adventurers Tuesday night after a 51-day trek on skis, a spokesman for the expedition said today. The women--Victoria Murden, 24, a Harvard University theology student from Cambridge, Mass., and 37-year-old businesswoman Shirley Metz of Capistrano Beach, Calif.--skied across 740 miles of the frozen continent.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | DEBORAH CHRISTENSEN
Jeb Stuart Magruder is well-versed on the subject of honesty. Now a Presbyterian minister outside Columbus, Ohio, he served a seven-month jail term for his role in Watergate. He also is chairman of the newly formed Columbus Commission on Ethics and Values, which has just kicked off a campaign to promote the virtues of honesty and ethics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1987 | Associated Press
A $69,500 price tag isn't stopping people from signing up for a historic skiing trip to the South Pole, the most desolate spot on earth where temperatures average minus-10 degrees and winds reach 155 m.p.h. "We only have two openings left," said Nadia Le Bon, who is organizing the expedition for Mountain Travel, an Albany, Calif., adventure company that specializes in "treks, outings and expeditions."
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, Times Staff Writer
Shirley Metz can go climb a rock if she wants. She can balance herself on sheer faces of granite 3,000 feet high or stand on the tiniest of ledges where eagles dare to fly. But there is one thing she cannot do. She cannot look down. The last time she did in the Wyoming Tetons was unforgettable. As she was dangling like an oversize marionette, fastened only to an expert climber perched above her, Metz was overcome by a fear of heights.
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