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Victoria Profitt

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2001 | DARYL H. MILLER, Daryl H. Miller is a regular contributor to Calendar
As one of the busiest set designers in Los Angeles' small-theater scene, Victoria Profitt has developed some highly specialized skills. She is able, for instance, to divine the precise combination of flexible plastic tubing and fake foliage that will make Jack's magical beanstalk spring to life for a children's play.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2001 | DARYL H. MILLER, Daryl H. Miller is a regular contributor to Calendar
As one of the busiest set designers in Los Angeles' small-theater scene, Victoria Profitt has developed some highly specialized skills. She is able, for instance, to divine the precise combination of flexible plastic tubing and fake foliage that will make Jack's magical beanstalk spring to life for a children's play.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1996 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Joe Pintauro's elegiac drama "Men's Lives" at Theatre Geo is a moving chronicle of hardscrabble Long Island fishing folk. The sprawling history covering about 300 years, from Pilgrim times to the present, is inspired by the final chapters of Peter Matthiessen's book of the same name. Fact-based but fictionalized, the play grippingly portrays the uneven struggles of one family caught in the net of a powerful sports fishing lobby intent upon outlawing the family's ancestral livelihood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Set in 1957, August Wilson's finely tuned "Fences" balances the microcosm of one beleaguered black family against the sweeping forces of a society in painful transition. Originally staged by Lloyd Richards, the play revolves around its epic protagonist, Troy Maxson, a role ineradicably associated with its originator, James Earl Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2001
It is so great to finally have a face connected with the wonderful Victoria Profitt ("Creating a Set That's in Character," by Daryl H. Miller, Sept. 23). She is no longer just the name of an "angel in the night." I had heard she could work a miracle if needed. I called her in the middle of the night crying for stairs to help actors onto an existing set at the Pasadena Playhouse for "The Baker's Wife" presented by the Musical Theatre Guild last year. By the time I got to the theater the next morning for rehearsal, Profitt had delivered and installed freshly made carpeted stairs for my cast--and left no bill.
NEWS
June 9, 2005 | Rob Kendt, Special to The Times
"It brings back a lot of memories," one older patron said as she looked at a barbed-wire fence to the side of Victoria Profitt's set of a World War II-era internment camp, the backdrop for writer-director Leslie K. Gray's short puppet show "The Pink Dress."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
The Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle succumbed to "Reefer Madness!" Monday, awarding the little musical seven of the circle's annual awards--more than twice the number won by any other show. "Reefer" won in seven of the eight categories for which it was nominated. It lost only in the writing competition, in which its libretto was nominated--although the music and lyrics by the same two writers, Kevin Murphy and Dan Studney, did win in the category for outstanding score.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Paul Osborn's "Morning's at Seven," first produced in 1939 and now at Theatre 40, is a warmly eccentric view of small-town family life that examines, inadvertently or not, the limited role of women in pre-feminist America. Damned if they do and damned if they don't, the play's married women are bedeviled by their husbands' demands and idiosyncrasies, while the unmarried bemoan their "spinster" status and lack of a "real home."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1996 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
If you're in the mood to get goofy and giggle, Neil Simon's "Rumors" at the Whitefire Theatre is a good bet. Simon's answer to French farce--without the sex--"Rumors" is a frenetically paced sendup of shallow, wealthy New York suburbanites poised on the brink of scandal. Indubitably fluffy, Simon's play may not stick to your ribs--but what it lacks in depth, it makes up in structure. A difficult genre, farce relies upon hair-trigger timing and sheer bombast.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2000 | PHILIP BRANDES
Nearly three decades after its premiere, "Balm in Gilead," Lanford Wilson's daring, uncompromising portrait of an all-night New York diner and its lowlife denizens, still has the power to shock and astonish. Under Allen Williams' assured staging, Camelot Artists' suitably raucous revival at the Skylight Theatre leaves that issue in no doubt.
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