Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVictoria Steele
IN THE NEWS

Victoria Steele

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
June 27, 1999
Victoria Steele, librarian: "Dark Side of Fortune" by Margaret Leslie Davis (University of California Press). "Drawing on original sources, many studied for the first time, Davis tells the story of Edward L. Doheny, patriarch of the important Los Angeles family, both compellingly and fairly." **** Amy P. Hendel, nutritionist-personal trainer: "Uncommon Sense for Parents with Teenagers" by Michael Riera (Celestial Arts).
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
SPORTS
January 20, 1985 | United Press International
Canada's Olympic gold-medal winning rowing eight has been awarded the Dick Ellis Memorial Trophy as Canadian team of the year, the Sports Federation of Canada announced. The Canadian squad outdistanced the New Zealand world champions and a highly touted American team at Lake Casitas, Calif., to capture Canada's first gold medal in an Olympic rowing event since 1964. The team came together in April last year and soon made its mark, setting a course record in defeating the U.S.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | TERRY PRISTIN
Sixty-two years after its founding, the Zamorano Club, a distinguished organization of Southern California bibliophiles that includes many luminaries in the book-collecting world, has been quietly integrated. Until now, the private club, named after California's first printer, Don Augustin Zamorano, has limited its membership to 80 men--a practice that failed to cause any ripples for most of its history.
REAL ESTATE
April 20, 1986
Fifteen awards "honoring architectural and landscaping accomplishments that enhance the beauty and environment" were presented at the 16th annual Beautification Awards luncheon of the Los Angeles West Chamber of Commerce at the Hotel Bel-Air. Topping the winners were Hughes Aircraft's headquarters at 7200 Hughes Terrace, in the Westchester area, recipient of the Jeffrey H. Tamkin Award for the outstanding new commercial structure, and Mount St.
MAGAZINE
May 21, 2006 | Rick Wartzman
During each of the seven moves I've made since college, I have felt pressure --from my wife or simply common sense--to shed various belongings while packing up the old place. Invariably, I've resisted.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1992 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The best exhibitions are not necessarily those that come with blockbuster bunting and pompous public service spots on PBS. There is a lot to be said for small, smart exercises that sidle up sideways and whisper poetry in your ear. Tickles. One such is "Renaissance to Risorgimento: An Exhibition of Italian Books and Manuscripts in Honor of Franklin D. Murphy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1990 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind a door secured by a padlock and chain, packing cartons are piled on the floor. An empty Rolodex rests on a battered storage cabinet along with several boxes of unfiled clippings. Sugar cubes spill from a half-empty container. Nearby--almost as a reminder of the elan that once inhabited this place--is a single copy of a newspaper dated Nov. 2, 1989. "So Long L.A.!" the banner headline exclaims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1990 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind a door secured by a padlock and chain, packing cartons are piled on the floor. An empty Rolodex rests on a battered storage cabinet along with several boxes of unfiled clippings. Sugar cubes spill from a half-empty container. Nearby--almost as a reminder of the elan that once inhabited this place--is a single copy of a newspaper dated Nov. 2, 1989. "So Long, L.A.!" the banner headline exclaims.
BOOKS
March 16, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer.
A writer's ideas are his legacy. After he dies, it's up to executors, heirs, lawyers, agents and colleagues to keep them alive -- and perhaps especially up to us, the readers, to thread those ideas through the weave of history, the passage of time, our own lives. Writers are the most potent of ghosts. Their spirits lodge in our quotidian decisions; we turn to them in times of change and times of terror. When their wisdom is unavailable, our choices get harder.
NEWS
January 26, 2002 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The UCLA Library has purchased the literary archive of Susan Sontag, one of the best-known and most influential American intellectuals of the late 20th century. Sources close to the sale say the library paid $1.1 million for her personal papers, letters and manuscripts and library. Funds were donated by an anonymous UCLA alumna. Sontag, 69, was raised in Tucson and Los Angeles but has lived in New York more than four decades.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|