Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVictoria Vesna
IN THE NEWS

Victoria Vesna

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
* A bare-chested young Vietnamese man wanders through the vast empty lobby of a steel-and-glass office building in an Irvine corporate park. A notice posted outside warns visitors that substances inside the building may cause cancer. * Ducks paddle peacefully on an artificial lake elsewhere in Irvine as the Vietnamese man is heard calmly reminiscing about running out of food during his family's perilous escape from their native land: "That was the first time we experienced near-death.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
* A bare-chested young Vietnamese man wanders through the vast empty lobby of a steel-and-glass office building in an Irvine corporate park. A notice posted outside warns visitors that substances inside the building may cause cancer. * Ducks paddle peacefully on an artificial lake elsewhere in Irvine as the Vietnamese man is heard calmly reminiscing about running out of food during his family's perilous escape from their native land: "That was the first time we experienced near-death.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1999
Bet they don't let you eat popcorn at the Van Gogh exhibition. Enjoy art and a movie at "Projections: Intermission Images," an exhibition of artworks in slide format created especially for the screen, opening tonight at Laemmle Theatres downtown. Using the screen as a canvas, artists David Antin, Anne Bray, Annetta Kapon, Laura London, Ming-Yuen S. Ma, Armando Rascon, Joseph Santarromana, Erika Suderberg, Tran T.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1998 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Two group exhibitions at Barnsdall Art Park concentrate on mostly lesser-known L.A. artists. Both address private worlds that end up appearing quite familiar. "Xtrascape" at the Municipal Art Gallery is a thoughtfully oblique thematic exercise presenting nine artists. "Night Visions," at the Junior Art Center, addresses a subject historically commonplace in art--our dreams.
NEWS
January 18, 2007 | Shana Ting Lipton, Special to The Times
THE sight of cars piling onto Interstate 5 is a familiar one to many. But in the multimedia art installation "Airlight SoCal," the air pollution surrounding the vehicles is the focal point. The freeway is depicted via a real-time webcam, as its footage and audio mutate based on incoming smog data from the South Coast Air Quality Management District.
MAGAZINE
August 31, 2003 | ANDREW JOHN IGNATIUS VONTZ
Just because a discipline still exists largely in science fiction is no reason it can't have its own university department. The California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA and UC Santa Barbara means to take us beyond the computer chip to a world where molecules themselves can be controlled, with revolutionary implications for medicine, engineering and, well, fashion.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
Ambitious, passionate and iconoclastic, even when they are less than first-rate, the works by 52 artists in "Virgin Territories" deal in some way with the timely quincentennial theme of what happens when one culture dominates another and manipulates the facts of history into a convenient fiction. Organized by the Long Beach Museum of Art, where it is on view through Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1999 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If her record is any indication, the new director of the UC Irvine Art Gallery will hoist the same adventurous flag that's flown over the facility for much of its 34 years. Jeanie Weiffenbach, who stepped into the post March 1, exhibited nationally known artists whose work tackled abortion rights, child sexual abuse and corporate media dominance during the past decade as the San Francisco Art Institute's director of exhibitions.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1999 | RANDY LEWIS and ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It's a safe bet that if "Salt of the Earth" (1954) had dealt only with a labor strike by zinc miners in New Mexico, it never would have become the cult classic it is. The primitive acting by most of the nonprofessionals in the cast makes for some rough movie-watching. Actors almost spit their lines at one another.
NEWS
April 14, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the UCLA campus, in a room devoid of textiles--just cement, wires and screens--a group of about 150 people discussed the future of books, literature, words. These people, gathered for a recent Symposium on Electronic Literature, don't think of books in terms others do, the printed word, the rustle of a turning page. They speak of a "new literary movement." They are building "a new kind of subjectivity." They are trying to recapture, "to salvage the human inside of technology."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1993 | CATHY CURTIS
I witnessed an eye-popping marriage of art and future-tech last week, but the newlyweds struck me as rather ill at ease. Despite the investment of lavish amounts of expertise, creative brainpower and highly sophisticated equipment, many of the works were more like toys or games than thoughtful works of art. Still, the questions raised by the very notion of combining art and cutting-edge technology made "Machine Culture: The Virtual Frontier" worth seeing.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|