Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVictoria Williams
IN THE NEWS

Victoria Williams

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1987 | Robert Hilburn
Victoria Williams' "Happy Come Home" is one of the most heartwarmingly original albums of the year, a collection of 13 songs and stories that celebrate gentle moments and truths with an uncommonly optimistic and endearing vision. Some of Williams' tales--including an ode to a pair of old shoes--are so slight by conventional pop standards that you could imagine an admiring record producer praising them, then urging Williams to go home and finish the songs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2000 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Singer-songwriter Victoria Williams and her band temporarily transformed the El ReyTheatre stage into her back porch on Thursday, re-creating the magical desert-sky vibe of her latest album, "Water to Drink." Accompanying herself on guitar and piano, the Louisiana native and Joshua Tree resident was backed by a casually precise sextet that included her husband, Mark Olson.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES ORANGE COUNTY POP MUSIC CRITIC
A lot of people go into pop music so they can be hipsters. But Victoria Williams is unusual. You might call the Los Angeles-based singer a hickster. Williams, who hails from Forbing, La., has released two albums marked by a sense of old-time, rural innocence. On her 1987 debut album "Happy Come Home" and the new "Swing the Statue," she unaffectedly weaves yarns that could be her own take on the Southern tradition of fable-spinning embodied in the Uncle Remus tales.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2000 | (Marc Weingarten)
Victoria Williams, "Water to Drink," Atlantic. To her usual understated ruminations, Williams has added a handful of standards, and she brings a child's sense of wonder to sentiments we've heard thousands of times before.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Ten years ago, at a time when "Women in Rock" stories were still trumpeting the likes of Grace Slick, Heart and Linda McCartney, a revolution was getting under way in Los Angeles. On the then-growing L.A. club scene, it was hard not to notice that--especially compared to certain Eastern burgs--a disproportionate number of those at the forefront of this city's scene were charismatic, gutsy, mercurial women: X's Exene Cervenka, the Motels' Martha Davis, the Go-Go's. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1998 | Natalie Nichols
She's been recording for more than 10 years, but until recently Victoria Williams has probably been known more by reputation than for her eclectic work. The eccentric singer-songwriter is a musicians' cult figure of sorts, so admired by the likes of Lou Reed, Michelle Shocked and Maria McKee that they participated in 1993's "Sweet Relief," a benefit album of Williams songs that helped pay for her multiple sclerosis treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1994 | Chris Willman, Chris Willman is a frequent contributor to Calendar
' Over here!" calls out Victoria Williams' in her unmistakably high-pitched twang, from somewhere mysterious in the vicinity of her smallish Laurel Canyon home. Her voice is coming from next door, but with all possible entrances to her neighbor's house locked, and an eight-foot wooden fence in between, Williams' fetching Lousiana accent seems destined to remain disembodied for the moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2000 | Marc Weingarten
Victoria Williams, "Water to Drink," Atlantic. To her usual understated ruminations, Williams has added a handful of standards, and she brings a child's sense of wonder to sentiments we've heard thousands of times before.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | Steve Hochman
* * * Victoria Williams, "This Moment in Toronto," Mammoth/Atlantic. If the Louisiana sprite's regular albums are treasures of quirky, home-spun charm, her concerts are even more so. This live set captures that casual, living-room warmth, adding new songs and a lovely, brittle "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" to her repertoire--plus a visit to the stage by her dog, Molly. Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (e x cellent).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1992
L.A. singer Victoria Williams has received some interesting support since word got out that she's been stricken with multiple sclerosis. Among the donations was a check for $1,000 from David Geffen, whose record label dropped Williams after one unsuccessful 1987 album. And shortly after a recent benefit concert, a envelope with a return address on Bob Hope Drive in Palm Springs arrived at the office of her manager, Danny Heaps.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2000 | MARC WEINGARTEN
Like the Southern folk artists she so admires, Williams is enchanted by the everyday miracles to be found in life and nature. She is among the least jaded contemporary songwriters, a chronicler of the incidental moments that transform the prosaic into the transcendent. Williams' latest album (due in stores Tuesday) finds the Louisiana native turned Joshua Tree resident homed in on the same subject matter, but she's using a broader palette this time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1998 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
Peter Case and Victoria Williams' marriage may not have lasted, but the singer-songwriters, alums of the glorious '80s Los Angeles club scene that also produced X and Los Lobos, are reunited in this edition of the Guide, which advises how to keep up with what's fresh in pop music on a budget of $50 a month.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1998 | NATALIE NICHOLS
Singer-songwriter Victoria Williams was surrounded by admirers Thursday night, and it's tough to say who was more delighted--the rapt Roxy audience or the musicians on stage with her. Backed by 10 band members, Williams played banjo, piano, guitar and harmonica, singing her unique folk- and jazz-laced pop tunes to an audience that remained attentive throughout the nearly two-hour performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1998 | Natalie Nichols
She's been recording for more than 10 years, but until recently Victoria Williams has probably been known more by reputation than for her eclectic work. The eccentric singer-songwriter is a musicians' cult figure of sorts, so admired by the likes of Lou Reed, Michelle Shocked and Maria McKee that they participated in 1993's "Sweet Relief," a benefit album of Williams songs that helped pay for her multiple sclerosis treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | Steve Hochman
* * * Victoria Williams, "This Moment in Toronto," Mammoth/Atlantic. If the Louisiana sprite's regular albums are treasures of quirky, home-spun charm, her concerts are even more so. This live set captures that casual, living-room warmth, adding new songs and a lovely, brittle "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" to her repertoire--plus a visit to the stage by her dog, Molly. Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (e x cellent).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1994 | LORRAINE ALI
Victoria Williams is probably best known for last year's album "Sweet Relief," a benefit record to assist the singer-songwriter's fight with multiple sclerosis and her efforts to establish health care for uninsured musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1994 | Steve Hochman
VICTORIA WILLIAMS, "Loose" ( Mammoth/Atlantic )**** It may sound like trite hype to call Williams a national treasure, but why mince words over such a valuable talent? Her third and best album is filled with distinctive revelries in the many small joys and large awes she finds in life, feelings that apparently were only intensified by her battle with multiple sclerosis.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|