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Vicunas

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NEWS
July 27, 1986 | LUIS EDUARDO PODESTA, Associated Press
The vicuna, relentlessly hunted for its prized wool and fur, has survived the threat of extinction thanks to an international environmental effort, a Peruvian ecologist says. Hundreds of thousands of vicunas, a smaller, fleet-footed cousin of the camel and llama, once ranged throughout the Andes mountains from Ecuador to Bolivia.
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NEWS
July 16, 2006 | Leslie Josephs and Edison Lopez, Associated Press Writers
Hundreds of villagers march side by side across the wind-blasted Andean plain, closing in on their prey: herds of nervous, fast-moving vicunas -- the smaller, wilder cousins of llamas and alpacas. Chanting and shaking a long rope with colorful streamers, the participants encircle the shaggy-coated animals in a ritual that was known to the ancient Inca but nearly abandoned in the 20th century.
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NEWS
October 27, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
Sherman Adams, who resigned under fire as President Dwight D. Eisenhower's chief White House aide in 1958 after accepting a vicuna coat and other gifts from an old friend who was having problems with the government, died today. He was 87 and died in a hospital in Hanover, N.H., of respiratory complications. He most recently had owned a posh ski resort in the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
Some of Peru's poorest people may be about to break free from 500 years of economic isolation with the help of an unlikely ally--the vicuna. A sort of understated version of the better-known llama, this shy animal lives above two miles in the inhospitable Andes.It's suddenly become a hot commodity for the very reason it was hunted to the verge of extinction in the 1960s--its long silky hair. Vicuna fleece contains fibers so fine they make cashmere feel coarse, sporting an average diameter of 12.
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | TIM JOHNSON, United Press International
The government of Peru has helped nurture the furry vicuna back from near extinction in the Andes and will soon start shearing the animal and selling what experts say is the finest wool in the world. The graceful vicuna, a fleet cousin of the more widely known llama, once numbered in the hundreds of thousands along the slopes and plateaus of the South American Andes.
NEWS
October 28, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
Sherman Adams, who resigned under fire as President Dwight D. Eisenhower's chief White House aide in 1958 after accepting a vicuna coat and other gifts from an old friend who was having problems with the government, died Monday. He was 87 and died in Hanover, N.H., of respiratory ailments and renal complications, a nurse said. Powerful Figure Until his resignation, Adams, a former Republican governor of New Hampshire, was the second most powerful figure in the executive branch of the government.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Look, vicunas." The arid Andean plateau, 13,000 feet above sea level, stretched into distant hills where dust devils swirled over long gray slopes. It seemed too barren, too desolate a place for such beautiful creatures to live. But six vicunas skittered away from the dirt road as the van pulled up. "It's a family group," said Mauricio de Romana, a Peruvian conservationist, as he watched from inside the vehicle. "It's a male and five females."
BUSINESS
December 12, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
Some of Peru's poorest people may be about to break free from 500 years of economic isolation with the help of an unlikely ally--the vicuna. A sort of understated version of the better-known llama, this shy animal lives above two miles in the inhospitable Andes.It's suddenly become a hot commodity for the very reason it was hunted to the verge of extinction in the 1960s--its long silky hair. Vicuna fleece contains fibers so fine they make cashmere feel coarse, sporting an average diameter of 12.
NEWS
July 16, 2006 | Leslie Josephs and Edison Lopez, Associated Press Writers
Hundreds of villagers march side by side across the wind-blasted Andean plain, closing in on their prey: herds of nervous, fast-moving vicunas -- the smaller, wilder cousins of llamas and alpacas. Chanting and shaking a long rope with colorful streamers, the participants encircle the shaggy-coated animals in a ritual that was known to the ancient Inca but nearly abandoned in the 20th century.
TRAVEL
October 10, 1993 | JACK BELLAMY and PAULINE BELLAMYBD The Bellamys, independent filmmakers based in Bristol, England, have been producing nature documentaries for the British Broadcasting Corp. for 20 years.
Judging solely by the map, this would seem to be one of the most bizarre countries on Earth. Averaging only 110 miles in width, it stretches along South America's lower Pacific coast for about 2,600 miles, a distance encompassing four-mile-high volcanic peaks, bone-chilling glaciers, dead salt lakes, fairy-tale-like fiords, bone-dry desert and sky-high plateaus. All of this may suggest, if not an alien planet, at the very least an inhospitable land for tourists.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Look, vicunas." The arid Andean plateau, 13,000 feet above sea level, stretched into distant hills where dust devils swirled over long gray slopes. It seemed too barren, too desolate a place for such beautiful creatures to live. But six vicunas skittered away from the dirt road as the van pulled up. "It's a family group," said Mauricio de Romana, a Peruvian conservationist, as he watched from inside the vehicle. "It's a male and five females."
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | TIM JOHNSON, United Press International
The government of Peru has helped nurture the furry vicuna back from near extinction in the Andes and will soon start shearing the animal and selling what experts say is the finest wool in the world. The graceful vicuna, a fleet cousin of the more widely known llama, once numbered in the hundreds of thousands along the slopes and plateaus of the South American Andes.
NEWS
October 28, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
Sherman Adams, who resigned under fire as President Dwight D. Eisenhower's chief White House aide in 1958 after accepting a vicuna coat and other gifts from an old friend who was having problems with the government, died Monday. He was 87 and died in Hanover, N.H., of respiratory ailments and renal complications, a nurse said. Powerful Figure Until his resignation, Adams, a former Republican governor of New Hampshire, was the second most powerful figure in the executive branch of the government.
NEWS
October 27, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
Sherman Adams, who resigned under fire as President Dwight D. Eisenhower's chief White House aide in 1958 after accepting a vicuna coat and other gifts from an old friend who was having problems with the government, died today. He was 87 and died in a hospital in Hanover, N.H., of respiratory complications. He most recently had owned a posh ski resort in the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire.
NEWS
July 27, 1986 | LUIS EDUARDO PODESTA, Associated Press
The vicuna, relentlessly hunted for its prized wool and fur, has survived the threat of extinction thanks to an international environmental effort, a Peruvian ecologist says. Hundreds of thousands of vicunas, a smaller, fleet-footed cousin of the camel and llama, once ranged throughout the Andes mountains from Ecuador to Bolivia.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | GAILE ROBINSON
David Bowie is touring with his band, Tin Machine. And in keeping with its garage image, he has replaced the Armani suits of his previous fashion incarnation with a clean, white T-shirt rolled up at the sleeves, jeans, a greased pompadour and slim sideburns. Midway throughhis set at the Palladium last week, (and on "Arsenio" the following night), he slipped a T-shirt over his head as if it were a hangman's mask, sang a song through it, then performed the rest of the show bare-chested.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1997 | LUCIEN O. CHAUVIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Many customers walk right past the toilet paper and soft drinks at Edgar Palpan's grocery store, straight through to the crocodiles and tree sloths. Birds, piranhas, a collection of snakes and other exotic reptiles fill the first floor of the store, also Palpan's home in the poor Lima barrio of Los Olivos. "I've even gotten a jaguar for one man. They are in demand because they're cute when they're small," he says.
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