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Vidal Herrera

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BUSINESS
April 7, 2008 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
Vidal Herrera has heard every joke about death. But death has been a godsend to Herrera, who runs three growing businesses out of a gray, two-story building along a dreary El Sereno strip of auto body shops and small warehouses. After a back injury ended his career as a deputy field investigator for the Los Angeles County coroner's office, Herrera started 1800Autopsy.com, performing private autopsies, DNA tests and other forensic services. So successful, he turns away business at times.
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BUSINESS
September 20, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Time
Several prop houses in Los Angeles County have been killed off in the last decade by the flight of production from Southern California to cheaper locales. But one local business has managed to survive by catering to Hollywood's morbid obsession with death. Vidal Herrera, a former deputy field investigator for the Los Angeles County coroner's office, has built a small but thriving business in East L.A. by supplying mortuary props to the film and TV industry. An offshoot of his private autopsy business, Morgue Prop Rentals sells and rents body freezers, crypts, autopsy tables, dissecting equipment and embalming instruments.
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BUSINESS
September 20, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Time
Several prop houses in Los Angeles County have been killed off in the last decade by the flight of production from Southern California to cheaper locales. But one local business has managed to survive by catering to Hollywood's morbid obsession with death. Vidal Herrera, a former deputy field investigator for the Los Angeles County coroner's office, has built a small but thriving business in East L.A. by supplying mortuary props to the film and TV industry. An offshoot of his private autopsy business, Morgue Prop Rentals sells and rents body freezers, crypts, autopsy tables, dissecting equipment and embalming instruments.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2008 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
Vidal Herrera has heard every joke about death. But death has been a godsend to Herrera, who runs three growing businesses out of a gray, two-story building along a dreary El Sereno strip of auto body shops and small warehouses. After a back injury ended his career as a deputy field investigator for the Los Angeles County coroner's office, Herrera started 1800Autopsy.com, performing private autopsies, DNA tests and other forensic services. So successful, he turns away business at times.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1995 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Expertly wielding the tools of his trade, Vidal Herrera neatly removed the brain of an Alzheimer's victim who lay lifeless on a mortuary table. Herrera gingerly placed the brain in an ice-filled container. Later that day, he would take the brain to a Westside lab where it would be photographed, sliced and frozen in liquid nitrogen for 15 scientists researching Alzheimer's disease around the world. Brain removals are all in a day's work for Herrera, owner and operator of Autopsy/Post Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2001 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Body bags and restaurants just don't mix. After hearing from nearby merchants who fear that the steady arrival and departure of corpses would hurt business, a city planning commission on Thursday rejected a privately run autopsy lab proposed for a Tujunga retail district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1997 | Steve Harvey
A garden containing herbs that are mentioned in Shakespeare's works opened in front of the Bayshore Library in Belmont Shore, and officials can only hope that grungy beach-goers steer clear of it. "When our library was designed back in 1958, the architect envisioned a beautiful fountain at the Bayshore entrance," the library newsletter recalled sadly. "It was built and filled with water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1997 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With names like Do Not Resuscitate, Fat Boy Five and Run-A-Muck, it was clear that winning wasn't the main thing on the minds of many of the teams competing in the 16th annual Jimmy Stewart Relay Marathon in Griffith Park. "Most of us are just here to have fun," said Diane Marshall, an accountant for Universal Studios, running on the team Unaccountables. "It's great to come together and to support a good cause."
BUSINESS
September 18, 1995 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Expertly wielding the tools of his trade, Vidal Herrera neatly removed the brain of an Alzheimer's victim who lay lifeless on a mortuary table. Herrera gingerly placed the brain in an ice-filled container. Later that day, he would take the brain to a Westside lab where it would be photographed, sliced and frozen in liquid nitrogen for 15 scientists researching Alzheimer's disease around the world. Brain removals are all in a day's work for Herrera, owner and operator of Autopsy/Post Services.
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
At least dead men don't give you the runaround. That much Vidal Herrera knows. Herrera, 42, owns an El Sereno company called Autopsy/Post Services Inc. So far, he's found it easier to cut up dead bodies and scoop out lungs and hearts than to get information about a job training bill from his elected representatives. Herrera has become something of a media sensation since his "discovery" a year ago by my colleague, "Only in L.A." columnist Steve Harvey.
HEALTH
April 21, 2008 | Christie Aschwanden, Special to The Times
When a relative discovered Sharon Waldorf's 64-year-old mother dead in her Paramount home, Waldorf asked her mom's physician about an autopsy. "The doctor didn't want us to do it," she recalls. Waldorf's mother had been in and out of the hospital that year with a series of strokes and seizures, and the doctor was confident that a stroke had killed her. Besides, the doctor said, an autopsy would cost several thousand dollars and insurance wouldn't pay. Waldorf and her two sisters insisted.
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