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Video Arcades

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NEWS
November 28, 1985 | JULIE OGASAWARA, Times Staff Writer
A proposed conditional-use permit that would allow a 60-game video arcade on Pico Boulevard near Overland Avenue to move two blocks east has drawn surprisingly strong objections from neighbors, according to city officials and arcade owners. About 60 residents who live near the proposed new site at 10670-72 Pico Blvd. attended a public zoning hearing in mid-November and said that Captain Video Games would attract teen-age loiterers and create noise, parking, traffic and crime problems.
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NEWS
October 20, 2005 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
PART of the fun in playing video games in a language you don't speak -- in this case, Japanese -- is the inherent element of chance. A prompt on the screen gives you a choice, which you don't realize you've made until after you've pushed a button. So it was that I became Glenn, a raven-haired, acrobatic cop out to save an alien world from imminent invasion in Sega's 2001 Planet Harriers game.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1990 | JAMES TORTOLANO
Attorneys representing five adult video arcades are expected in Superior Court today to argue for special permits to operate. A Garden Grove ordinance requires the permits for adult video arcades. A hearing officer denied permit applications from all but one of the seven peep show operators in the city, and that action was upheld by the City Council. Monday's trial will include a review of the council decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1997 | MIMI KO CRUZ
A vacant lot on Commonwealth Avenue will remain empty now that city officials have rejected a proposal to open an amusement center there. The property owner, Bert Sheadani, wanted a permit to open an arcade at 745 W. Commonwealth Ave. and put in 40 video games. But City Council members this week denied the application by upholding a recent Planning Commission decision against the business.
NEWS
September 10, 1992
The City Council has banned unaccompanied minors from the city's only pool hall, and has restricted hours that youngsters may patronize video arcades. The new ordinance, which was approved recently, also calls for adequate outside visibility and interior lighting and requires pool halls to provide security.
NEWS
February 7, 1985 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, Times Staff Writer
Owners of video arcades in Glendale are complaining that high license fees charged by the city are discriminatory and are forcing operators out of business at a time when the popularity of the arcades has waned. Norman R. Jones, who owns two of eight arcades in the city, said the $50-per-machine fee far exceeds fees charged other businesses in Glendale and is much higher than what neighboring cities levy against arcades. A dance hall, for example, pays $150 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Burbank City Council wants to limit new video arcades to those set up in restaurants, bowling alleys, hotels, cocktail lounges and pool halls to prevent the arcades from attracting loitering youths--even though police say the arcades do not create crime problems. The council voted 4 to 0 Tuesday night to direct city planners to write an ordinance limiting video arcades and pool halls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1994 | STEVE RYFLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eric San considers himself quite an expert at "Lethal Enforcer." The Glendale 13-year-old has spent hours firing imaginary bullets at the images of fleeing drug dealers and bank robbers on a video game screen. "It's pretty intense," he said while playing at the Glendale Amusement Center arcade on Brand Boulevard. "After a while you get hooked."
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | IRENE CHANG
In "The Music Man," the good people of River City, Iowa, were warned of the perils of pool halls. In modern-day Monterey Park, the City Council decided Monday, the menace is video-game arcades. Heeding Police Department warnings that such arcades attract gang members, the council unanimously rejected a proposal to build a 20-game arcade on the 2000 block of South Atlantic Boulevard. Thirty gangs are operating within a two-mile radius of the proposed arcade, Police Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA
The Burbank City Council, after refusing to allow a proposed video arcade to open, will develop a new zoning policy for arcades and pool halls, city officials said. The council voted 5 to 0 Tuesday to reject a petition to open a 50-machine video arcade at 933 N. Hollywood Way and then instructed city planners to develop zoning guidelines for arcades. "We felt it was an incompatible, unsafe use," Councilman Thomas Flavin said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1996
Four people were stabbed during a fight late Friday at Sega City in the Irvine Entertainment Center. Witnesses said the fight, which occurred at about 11 p.m., involved at least seven people. The other participants could not be found, said Irvine police Lt. Tom Little. About 30 minutes after the fight, a local hospital called Irvine police when four people--a 17-year-old boy and three 18-year-old men--arrived in the emergency room with serious but not life-threatening stab wounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1996
A security guard at a video arcade was shot and killed Saturday evening, police said. The victim was identified Sunday as Willie Parra-Avila, 27, of Santa Ana, Lt. David Petko said. Police said no witnesses have been found. The shooting occurred about 6 p.m. at the Super Games Arcade at 305 E. 4th St. When officers arrived, they found Parra-Avila dead. Police said the wound resembled that of a .357-caliber handgun.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1994 | MATTHEW MOSK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An exhausted Simi Valley Planning Commission endorsed a major new recreation and shopping complex early Thursday after discounting the threat of a catastrophic flood and embracing the idea that local teen-agers need more to do. Commissioners heard from 50 speakers and spent until 2:45 a.m. before voicing their support for the 180,000-square-foot complex planned for Royal Avenue and Madera Road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Daryl Hicks works at one of Orange County's newest summer hot spots, and he doesn't even have a suntan. Hicks is a technician at the Palace Park arcade, a dark and antiseptic place where the temperature is always an air-conditioned 71 degrees and the bright light comes from more than 100 flickering video game screens. Hicks has spent the summer making sure the chaos and mayhem is limited to the game monitors and that all the yelling is screams of joy and excitement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1994 | STEVE RYFLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eric San considers himself quite an expert at "Lethal Enforcer." The Glendale 13-year-old has spent hours firing imaginary bullets at the images of fleeing drug dealers and bank robbers on a video game screen. "It's pretty intense," he said while playing at the Glendale Amusement Center arcade on Brand Boulevard. "After a while you get hooked."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1993
You don't expect to get philosophy in a video arcade, but the one run by Richard Chipres in La Habra is a special place, run by a man showing how one person can make a difference, however small, in working with gang members. Chipres figures that the problems of some of today's teen-agers--drugs, gangs, graffiti--can be solved by good parents. If children look for love at home and don't find it, they seek it from their friends.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA
The Burbank City Council denied a permit for a proposed video arcade Tuesday night after it was discovered that the proposed business would violate city zoning codes because it was too close to a school. The proposed video arcade at 933 N. Hollywood Way would be located within 500 feet of the entrance of Theodore Roosevelt School a block away at 850 North Cordova Street.
NEWS
November 28, 1991
A bid to establish a large video game arcade at a shopping center in a crime-infested area was rejected by the City Council on Tuesday. The council voted 5 to 0 to deny an application by the Rettan Corp. to open the arcade, which would have had about 90 video games, at Azusa Way Center in the 500 block of South Azusa Way. The council concurred with a Planning Commission finding that the proposed arcade would attract more crime to a neighborhood blighted by illicit drug and gang activity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA
The Burbank City Council denied a permit for a proposed video arcade Tuesday night after it was discovered that the proposed business would violate city zoning codes because it was too close to a school. The proposed video arcade at 933 N. Hollywood Way would be located within 500 feet of the entrance of Theodore Roosevelt School a block away at 850 North Cordova Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Burbank City Council wants to limit new video arcades to those set up in restaurants, bowling alleys, hotels, cocktail lounges and pool halls to prevent the arcades from attracting loitering youths--even though police say the arcades do not create crime problems. The council voted 4 to 0 Tuesday night to direct city planners to write an ordinance limiting video arcades and pool halls.
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