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July 4, 2009 | Paul Young
The video art exhibition "The Moving Image" is filling the Orange County Museum of Art with an array of sounds and bright lights, but on one recent Saturday, just a handful of visitors roamed the galleries. Among them was a young mother trying to keep her two sandy-haired boys, ages 5 and 7, from playing with the equipment. "Hey, what's that?" one of them shouted as he turned a corner. "It's a spaceship!"
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February 1, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
The Getty Research Institute is absorbing yet another chunk of New York City's experimental-arts patrimony, having recently bought a huge archive of video art, video and audio recordings of live performances, photographs, original posters and other materials documenting the first three decades of work created at the Kitchen, a space in lower Manhattan that since 1971 has tried with frequent success to foster creative breakthroughs in visual art, performance...
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November 1, 2012 | By Sharon Mizota
Since the 1950s, stately Greystone Mansion in Beverly Hills has been a popular shooting location for all manner of Hollywood films, including “The Big Lebowski,” “The Social Network,” “Eraserhead” and “National Treasure.” But in 1929, it was the site of a different kind of shooting: Its owner, oil heir Ned Doheny Jr., and his secretary, Hugh Plunkett, were found dead in what was ruled a murder-suicide.  Local artist Kerry Tribe's...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Jack Black is sitting on a ratty basement couch in his underwear. His fleshy belly spills over the elastic band, and he's emanating a profoundly foul odor. Performance artist Jibz Cameron, a.k.a. Dynasty Handbag, sits beside Black, relishing in the stink. In this superhero spoof, recently screened at Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art, Black plays uber-villain Unidentifiable Odor. Cameron is his dour sidekick, Buzz Kill. Like cranky kids, they sit slumped over with scowls across their faces, plotting ways to ruin a perfectly good dinner date that is unfolding at a nearby restaurant.
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July 7, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Video art is notoriously hard to show in art galleries. It can hog a lot of space, its sound can spill over into other rooms, and its equipment can be cumbersome (though lighter and cheaper with every year). And that's not considering challenging content, like Brazilian artist Tunga's recent video of a bizarre, alchemy-fueled sexual encounter that makes David Lynch movies seem sweet and straightforward by comparison. So when gallery owner Christopher Grimes had the idea of doing a broad sampling of international video art in his space in Santa Monica, he wanted to make the format, if not the content itself, more accessible.
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August 25, 1997 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Video art is a form many gallery devotees will not touch with a 12-foot remote. It has, unfortunately, earned its bad reputation as a haven of self-indulgent amateurs who think they can make art out of a jumble of shots set against a mysteriously incoherent soundtrack with running times that seem longer than a Chinese opera.
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June 1, 1989 | ALAN M. BROWN, Brown is a free-lance writer in Tokyo. and
"I think that some of the most interesting artists working here and those working in the States, their ideas are connected. Artists are these amazing sensors, and they're always two years ahead of what other people are thinking," said Barbara London, the director of New York's Museum of Modern Art video program. London, who established MOMA's Video Exhibition Program and Video Study Center (the first new medium MOMA has added since it was founded), was on her fifth professional visit to Japan.
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November 21, 1987 | TERRY ATKINSON
As video cameras become more and more abundant, so does video art. For example, at the American Film Institute's seventh annual video festival last month, more than 120 hours of video works were shown and discussed. But one question kept coming up at panel discussions and in the informal chatter on the patio of the Mark Goodson building: Where else will these videos be seen?
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January 22, 1988 | TERRY ATKINSON
Wondering what the cultural phenomenon of the 1990s might be? Set your sights on video art. Video cameras and camcorders (camera-recorders) have become so light, small and easy to use--no developing, just play the tape on your VCR or plug the camcorder into your TV--that they're falling into the hands of more artists. And even people who never thought before about making their own "film." (Would somebody please come up with a handy term to cover both film and video!
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October 21, 1987 | DON SNOWDEN
Many video artists are drawn to the medium by the prospect of connecting with a broader audience than regular museum and gallery patrons. But how do these artists go about distributing and marketing their work? That's where Richard Kennedy says his business, Modern Visual Communications, enters the picture. Kennedy, 41, formed the company in 1985 to help extend the appeal of the medium beyond the faithful few die-hards who regularly attend video art events.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Victoria Looseleaf
The most startling - and stunning - moment in David Roussève's latest dance-theater hybrid, "Stardust," came an hour into the 80-minute intermissionless piece, which premiered Tuesday at REDCAT. The 53-year-old choreographer appeared, seemingly out of nowhere, to perform a heartwrenching solo set to Johnny Mathis crooning the Bach/Gounod “Ave Maria.” With his jerking, swooping arms and quasi-angelic face, Roussève, bathed in Christopher Kuhl's amber light, and bending and dipping as if the world's weight were on his shoulders, was spellbinding.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013
The "Everything Is" festival, presented by Cinefamily and Everything Is Terrible!, is back. The festival takes a supersonic nose dive into the world's weirdest found film footage, strangest VHS moments and most implausible video art installations, along with many other unintentional masterpieces of the wild world of underground, off-the-grid TV and cinema. Cinefamily, 611 N. Fairfax, L.A. Times and ticket prices vary. Through Wednesday. (323) 655-2510; http://www.cinefamily.org .
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July 27, 2013 | By Steve Appleford
In a corner office at the Museum of Contemporary Art, a big white board is a tangle of names, dates and ideas scrawled in brightly colored markers. At the center is a chart for the video network MOCAtv, plotting new programs on the artist Urs Fischer and leading architects, on the raw symbolism of punk rock and on something called "CRIME: The Animated Series. " It represents an ambitious range of art-based programming, only some of it directly tied to a MOCA exhibition. "The contemporary art world has so many tangents that we are still reaching out to," says John Toba, MOCAtv's head of production, looking up at the board.
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December 18, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin
Paris' Centre Pompidou, one of the world's leading contemporary and modern artmuseums, has for the first time joined forces with a public artmuseum in China. The exhibition “Electric Fields: Surrealism and Beyond - La Collection du Centre Pompidou” brings French art masterpieces to Shanghai, according to artdaily.org. It opened Sunday at the Power Station of Art, as part of the Shanghai Biennale. To realize the “Electric Fields” exhibition, Centre Pompidou sent 65 cases of video art, paintings, sculptures and manuscripts to Shanghai.
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November 12, 2012 | By David Ng
Eli Broad returned to his alma mater Michigan State University over the weekend to inaugurate a new contemporary art museum that bears his name. The Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum had a formal dedication on Saturday and opened to the public on Sunday. The museum on the university's East Lansing campus was designed by architect Zaha Hadid. Broad gave $28 million to MSU in 2007 for the creation of the museum -- $21 million going toward construction of the facility and $7 million for acquisitions, exhibitions and other functions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Sharon Mizota
Since the 1950s, stately Greystone Mansion in Beverly Hills has been a popular shooting location for all manner of Hollywood films, including “The Big Lebowski,” “The Social Network,” “Eraserhead” and “National Treasure.” But in 1929, it was the site of a different kind of shooting: Its owner, oil heir Ned Doheny Jr., and his secretary, Hugh Plunkett, were found dead in what was ruled a murder-suicide.  Local artist Kerry Tribe's...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1988 | Associated Press
Avant-garde artists armed with video cameras rather than paint brushes are creating electronic works of art designed to draw the viewer into the picture. "People are captivated by this art form," said video artist Mary Lucier. "It screens out distractions. It draws you into a completely new and different world. In that sense, it's kind of like going to the movies."
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July 7, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
Sergio Martinez lowered his head and grinned selfconsciously as videotaped images of him talking on the telephone flashed by on a video monitor. Martinez, 19, endured a few good-natured jabs about his screen image from Lou-ee Munoz and Gina Padilla, friends from the Para Los Ninos center in downtown Los Angeles, as they sat facing two screens in a cluttered corner of the third-floor office of Visual Communications.
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August 31, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The Walker Art Center, a modern art museum in Minneapolis, tested the boundaries of legitimate art at the first film festival dedicated to, well, online cat videos. The show included 70 videos of kitty high jinks over 60 minutes (take a moment to let that sink in). Included were the "Keyboard Cat" and "Very Angry Cat," which have racked up more than 100 million views on YouTube between them. A crowd of 10,000 people (and a few leashed cats) gathered Thursday night for the outdoor feline fest at the Walker, where the works of Frank Gehry and Joseph Cornell have been displayed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2012
ART REDCAT's New Original Works Festival continues with works by NICK+JAMES, Jinku Kim and Prumsodun Ok. Experimental dance, sound and video art and a multimedia project involving Cambodian pop music and traditional dance will all be on display to create a singular viewer experience. Roy and Edna Disney / Calarts Theater, 631 W. 2nd. St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. Thu. to Sat. $10 to $18. (213) 237-2800; http://www.redcat.org.
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