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BUSINESS
December 8, 1999 | (Reuters)
United Technologies Corp.'s Otis Elevator Co. said it will form a joint venture to put video screens in elevators to deliver news, weather and perhaps advertising to passengers. Otis said it will finalize the deal soon but that it is too early to predict revenue from the venture. UT's partners in the venture, called E-Display, are IBM Corp., which will provide technical assistance and perhaps hardware and software, and Next Generation Network Inc.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1991 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The home-video rental business, in the doldrums since last Christmas, is finally picking up, retailers from all over the country are happily reporting. Many attribute the boom to "Ghost," the smash hit that has increased traffic in stores. Paramount shipped a record 642,000 copies when the title was released in late March. The release of other popular films, such as "Flatliners," "Pacific Heights," "Presumed Innocent" and "Marked for Death," has contributed to the recent rental surge.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Executives at auto parts giant Tenneco Inc. can keep office televisions tuned to the increasingly popular business programming carried by cable TV channels like CNN, CNBC and MSNBC. But when they travel in Tenneco's business jet, they are forced to cut the umbilical that keeps them current with financial events. That's about to change as Airshow, a Tustin company, launches the first system for broadcasting television programs in business jets.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
FCC Seeks Different Course From US West: The agency's staff recommended denial of US West Inc.'s request to suspend an application to start video networks in five cities, but it suggested that US West formally withdraw the application and resubmit it when it is ready to move forward with its video network plans.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
NB to Test Delivering Video via Computers: The test using computers and high-speed telephone lines to deliver news and other video feeds to its affiliates is part of a partnership to be announced today with MCI Communications Corp. The system marks the first time a major network has used digital technology to deliver programming on demand. It also hints at a time when consumers will be able to access video programs whenever they wish.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1999 | (Reuters)
United Technologies Corp.'s Otis Elevator Co. said it will form a joint venture to put video screens in elevators to deliver news, weather and perhaps advertising to passengers. Otis said it will finalize the deal soon but that it is too early to predict revenue from the venture. UT's partners in the venture, called E-Display, are IBM Corp., which will provide technical assistance and perhaps hardware and software, and Next Generation Network Inc.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Executives at auto parts giant Tenneco Inc. can keep office televisions tuned to the increasingly popular business programming carried by cable TV channels like CNN, CNBC and MSNBC. But when they travel in Tenneco's business jet, they are forced to cut the umbilical that keeps them current with financial events. That's about to change as Airshow, a Tustin company, launches the first system for broadcasting television programs in business jets.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
Imagine renting "Coming to America" and seeing an ad for a local barbecue palace. Or renting "Baby Boom" and finding that the movie is preceded by a commercial for a neighborhood diaper service. Farfetched? Actually, it's happening in several states, including Texas, Kansas, Ohio and Tennessee. Companies there are placing local commercials on rental cassettes of major films. The video companies that distribute the cassettes are outraged, claiming copyright infringement, among other violations.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What home video fans have always feared--clusters of commercials on cassettes--is a step closer. This time next year, you may have to fast forward through two or three ads on a rental cassette before you get to the movie. A Kansas federal court apparently opened the floodgates recently with a stunning ruling in favor of Video Broadcasting Systems, a Wichita company that has been putting local ads on rental movies for the last two years.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
NB to Test Delivering Video via Computers: The test using computers and high-speed telephone lines to deliver news and other video feeds to its affiliates is part of a partnership to be announced today with MCI Communications Corp. The system marks the first time a major network has used digital technology to deliver programming on demand. It also hints at a time when consumers will be able to access video programs whenever they wish.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
FCC Seeks Different Course From US West: The agency's staff recommended denial of US West Inc.'s request to suspend an application to start video networks in five cities, but it suggested that US West formally withdraw the application and resubmit it when it is ready to move forward with its video network plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1991 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The home-video rental business, in the doldrums since last Christmas, is finally picking up, retailers from all over the country are happily reporting. Many attribute the boom to "Ghost," the smash hit that has increased traffic in stores. Paramount shipped a record 642,000 copies when the title was released in late March. The release of other popular films, such as "Flatliners," "Pacific Heights," "Presumed Innocent" and "Marked for Death," has contributed to the recent rental surge.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1990 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What appeared to the a booming business last fall--putting local ads on videotapes of hit movies--apparently has gone bust. Two companies, Video Broadcasting Systems of Wichita, Kan., and Video Air Time, of Midland, Tex., were at the forefront of this local-ad movement. Both, though, are virtually out of business. What these video-ad sales firms did was make deals with video store owners to put commercials for local businesses on the blank tape at the beginning of rental movies.
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