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December 31, 1989 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten years ago, amid the chaos of the Iranian Revolution and the rise of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's Islamic fundamentalist regime, the migration of upper-class Jews from Iran to the United States began in earnest. These were no ordinary huddled masses yearning to breathe free. This was one of the richest waves of immigrants ever to come to the United States.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1999
Image Entertainment Inc., Chatsworth, announced it has signed an exclusive output agreement with Corinth Films Inc., Regalsville, Penn., to release on digital video disk titles from the Wade Williams collection of 1950s-era science fiction films, which includes cult classics from director Edward Wood Jr., 1940s film producers Harry and Leo Popkin, and a number of early television series. Image Entertainment Inc.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Executives from the entertainment and electronics industries announced the agreement on copyright protection issues that for months have delayed the launch of highly anticipated digital video disk players. The pact eases concerns over piracy of music and movies in new digital formats. The deal sets a software scheme that scrambles content when making the digital video disks, then provides hardware for unscrambling the signal when played back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1999
A San Clemente evangelical organization is heralding a milestone in its two-decade-old "Jesus" film project--the release of the organization's movie by that name on a single DVD. DVD is a process allowing an entire motion picture to be stored on one disk. The new technology will allow the endeavor to reach an even wider audience, project director Paul Eshleman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1999
Image Entertainment Inc., Chatsworth, announced it has signed an exclusive output agreement with Corinth Films Inc., Regalsville, Penn., to release on digital video disk titles from the Wade Williams collection of 1950s-era science fiction films, which includes cult classics from director Edward Wood Jr., 1940s film producers Harry and Leo Popkin, and a number of early television series. Image Entertainment Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1999
A San Clemente evangelical organization is heralding a milestone in its two-decade-old "Jesus" film project--the release of the organization's movie by that name on a single DVD. DVD is a process allowing an entire motion picture to be stored on one disk. The new technology will allow the endeavor to reach an even wider audience, project director Paul Eshleman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1997 | DONALD LIEBENSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
So you've plunked down the $500 or more for a digital video disc player. Now, you're asking, where are the movies? Warner Home Video has taken the biggest plunge, releasing 32 movies in March and an additional nine in April. This month, other distributors are dipping a toe in the DVD waters, with new and upcoming releases--priced at $25 or less--ranging from classic and current films to concerts and adult-oriented fare.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Matsushita, MCA to Form Videodisc Unit: Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. and MCA Inc. will form a Los Angeles company to produce films for videodisc systems, according to the Japanese newspaper Nihon Keisai Shimbun. The company, Digital Video Compression Corp., will be owned by Matsushita and staffed by employees from Matsushita and MCA, the newspaper said.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1996 | JONATHAN WEBER
The consumer electronics industry is constantly searching for hot new products that might rival the VCR or the CD player in sales. But most recent efforts to establish new mass-market products have been a bust. * CDI: Philips' Compact Disc-Interactive, launched in 1991, was supposed to usher in the multimedia revolution. But the machine was clunky, expensive and late, and it lacked good software--the perfect recipe for failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1998 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly"--Sergio Leone's most famous spaghetti western, starring Clint Eastwood--being released on DVD (digital video disc) today, fans will finally get to see several scenes that were cut from the original 1966 Italian version. While the new footage doesn't provide any startling revelations, it illustrates certain subtleties of character displayed by Eastwood and his two co-stars, Eli Wallach and Lee Van Cleef.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1997 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its expanded memory, and higher quality images and sound, the digital video disk format has long been regarded as a potentially huge source of revenue for Hollywood. But consumers have been slow to embrace DVD, partly from the lack of available DVD products. Since March, DVD titles have been available in a few U.S. markets, including Los Angeles. Sales average about 20,000 units a week, according to trade publication VideoScan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1997 | DONALD LIEBENSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
So you've plunked down the $500 or more for a digital video disc player. Now, you're asking, where are the movies? Warner Home Video has taken the biggest plunge, releasing 32 movies in March and an additional nine in April. This month, other distributors are dipping a toe in the DVD waters, with new and upcoming releases--priced at $25 or less--ranging from classic and current films to concerts and adult-oriented fare.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Diamond Multimedia Systems Inc. says it will incorporate Toshiba Corp.'s DVD-ROM drives into its multimedia kits for personal computers. Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Diamond said that the kits are likely to be the first DVD products for PCs. Shipments are expected in the first quarter of 1997. The DVD, or digital videodisc, can hold up to 14 times as much information as a CD-ROM, enough for a full-length movie. An industry panel recently reached a tentative accord on technical standards.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Executives from the entertainment and electronics industries announced the agreement on copyright protection issues that for months have delayed the launch of highly anticipated digital video disk players. The pact eases concerns over piracy of music and movies in new digital formats. The deal sets a software scheme that scrambles content when making the digital video disks, then provides hardware for unscrambling the signal when played back.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When two warring electronics industry factions reached agreement last year on a single technical standard for the next-generation consumer electronics technology known as the digital videodisc, there were high hopes that the new machines would be the hottest product around this Christmas. DVD promised to challenge the videocassette recorder by offering disc-based movies with video and sound quality far superior to the VCR.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1995 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what almost seems analogous to the start of the Paris peace talks in the entertainment technology business, the two competing sides developing digital videodisc machines acknowledged Thursday that they are finally in discussions about creating a single format. The development brings together two parties--on one side, consumer electronics giants Philips Consumer Electronics Co. and Sony Corp., and on the other, media giant Time Warner Inc. and electronics conglomerate Toshiba Corp.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When two warring electronics industry factions reached agreement last year on a single technical standard for the next-generation consumer electronics technology known as the digital videodisc, there were high hopes that the new machines would be the hottest product around this Christmas. DVD promised to challenge the videocassette recorder by offering disc-based movies with video and sound quality far superior to the VCR.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Philips Shops DVD Patents: Philips Electronics said it has agreed to license digital videodisc patents for several of the companies that had a hand in inventing the technology, clearing the way for DVD to debut in time for holiday shopping. The Dutch electronics company will act as a one-stop shop for the DVD patents it holds as well as patents held by Sony Corp., Toshiba Corp. and Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. It will split the royalties according to a preset formula.
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