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Video Display Terminal

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1991 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that promises to thrust Los Angeles into a rancorous national debate, a city councilman has proposed that the city vigorously regulate the use of workplace video display terminals to protect employees from VDT-related injury and illness. Following the lead of San Francisco, Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky proposed "the strongest ordinance possible" to protect municipal and private industry computer users from real and suspected dangers of using the ubiquitous computer terminals.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1991 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that promises to thrust Los Angeles into a rancorous national debate, a city councilman has proposed that the city vigorously regulate the use of workplace video display terminals to protect employees from VDT-related injury and illness. Following the lead of San Francisco, Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky proposed "the strongest ordinance possible" to protect municipal and private industry computer users from real and suspected dangers of using the ubiquitous computer terminals.
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NEWS
July 6, 1988
Citing Suffolk County's new video display terminal bill, New York Telephone announced a hiring freeze on VDT jobs in the county and said it would close a directory assistance bureau there that employs about 125 people. Thomas Calabrese, general manager, said in a statement that the VDT-equipped Babylon directory assistance office will close when its lease expires Dec. 31 and other leases will be reviewed.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The New York City Council has approved legislation to protect the health and safety of more than 12,000 city workers who use video display terminals. The bill is the toughest VDT law in the nation and the first law of its kind in a major city, according to the New York City Video Display Terminal Coalition of labor unions and occupational safety and health groups.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The City Council has approved legislation to protect the health and safety of more than 12,000 city workers who use video display terminals. The bill is the toughest VDT law in the nation and the first law of its kind in a major city, according to the New York City Video Display Terminal Coalition of labor unions and occupational safety and health groups.
TRAVEL
May 25, 1997
I have just completed 14 hours of international air travel, and I am very upset because I am deaf and the brand-new Boeing 777 plane's seat video displays do not include closed captioning. My hearing husband was upset too. As soon as I got back, I called the airline to demand an explanation. They told me the screens were too small to include captioning. Bull! Commercials shown included small-print type, and those were clearly readable. They could have also developed a screen enlarger for use by deaf passengers.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Mayor Art Agnos today signed the nation's strictest law regulating video display terminal use by workers, despite a political rival's last-minute charges that the ordinance is illegal. The law requires 15-minute breaks and other safety measures, including proper lighting, anti-glare screens and adjustable furniture and equipment for VDT users. Tom Hsieh, a city supervisor opposing the measure, charged Wednesday that the ordinance violates the city charter.
HOME & GARDEN
August 1, 1992 | BOB DUKE
To calculate the maximum electrical power requirements of your home office, locate the power rating label that is affixed somewhere on every piece of electrically powered equipment and total the watts or amperes. For lighting, read the wattage rating on bulbs, or for fluorescent, read the label on the fixture. Convert all power requirements to amperes by dividing watts by 110. Amperes are more convenient for this purpose because circuit breakers are rated in amperes.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1985 | ROBERT HANLEY, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. District Court judge Tuesday denied a request by Digital Equipment Corp. to force C. Itoh Electronics Inc. and its Irvine-based subsidiary, CIE Terminals, to stop making equipment that allegedly looks too much like products made by Digital. The suit, filed last December in federal court in New Jersey contended that CIE's CIT-220-plus terminal mimicked the screen formats, keyboard layout and shape of Digital's VT220 video-display terminal.
NEWS
February 11, 1996 | From Reuters
An IBM computer called Deep Blue made chess history Saturday by comfortably beating world champion Garry Kasparov, marking a machine's first victory under classic tournament rules. Deep Blue, playing with the advantage of the white pieces, forced the Russian grandmaster to resign on the 37th move in the first game of a six-game match after surrounding his king with pieces and winning material in a relentless attack.
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