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Video Display Terminals

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1991 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that promises to thrust Los Angeles into a rancorous national debate, a city councilman has proposed that the city vigorously regulate the use of workplace video display terminals to protect employees from VDT-related injury and illness. Following the lead of San Francisco, Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky proposed "the strongest ordinance possible" to protect municipal and private industry computer users from real and suspected dangers of using the ubiquitous computer terminals.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 2001 | Reuters
Hitachi said it will exit the conventional desktop computer display-tube business, citing sluggish PC demand and a shift to new displays. Hitachi said it will halt production of cathode ray tubes used to make computer displays and close plants employing 770 workers in Sakura City, Japan, 950 in Singapore and 1,670 in Johore, Malaysia. Hitachi said it is reviewing its options on the sale of the cathode ray tube business, which generated about $470 million in revenue last year.
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NEWS
January 25, 2001
Nothing draws more "oohs" and "ahs" from co-workers than a big liquid crystal display monitor sitting on top of your desk. It's a sure sign of being a power user--someone who for some reason needs an outrageously expensive and thin monitor to do his or her work. Samsung recently came out with one of the slickest LCD monitors on the market--the 17-inch SyncMaster 170MP.
NEWS
December 9, 1988
Employees at USA Today headquarters in Arlington, Va., say that at least 14 women working in the newsrooms have had miscarriages since September, 1987, according to an informal survey discussed at a November meeting. Gannett Co. Inc., which owns the newspaper, recently hired a consultant to test the air flow and carpet and ceilings being installed in a major interior-renovation project in the building, begun last April, that employees suspect may have contributed to the problem.
NEWS
December 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Declaring it the worker safety issue of the 1990s, Mayor Art Agnos signed into law the nation's toughest legislation regulating video display terminals. Union leaders promised they now will turn the battle for regulation of computers in the workplace to the state and federal arenas.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
VDT Ordinance Challenged in Court: Two businesses are suing San Francisco, seeking to overturn an ordinance regulating use of video display terminals in the workplace. In their lawsuit, filed in San Francisco Superior Court, Zack Electronics and Data Processing and Accounting Services argue that only the state has authority to set safety rules for the workplace. The ordinance requires employers to provide adjustable equipment and furniture, training and regular breaks for VDT users.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The New York City Council has approved legislation to protect the health and safety of more than 12,000 city workers who use video display terminals. The bill is the toughest VDT law in the nation and the first law of its kind in a major city, according to the New York City Video Display Terminal Coalition of labor unions and occupational safety and health groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1991
A campaign to regulate the use of video-display terminals in the workplace scored a key political victory Wednesday as a Los Angeles City Council committee endorsed the creation of an ordinance that would require employers to implement safeguards against VDT-related injuries.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1995 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting on consumer complaints, officials in the state attorney general's office say they are nearing an agreement with computer makers to eliminate advertising practices that allegedly confuse consumers about the size of computer screens. The issue has drawn scrutiny from prosecutors and consumer advocates in Orange County and elsewhere in the state. The controversy centers on the discrepancy that often exists between the stated size of a computer monitor and the actual viewing area.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1995 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting on a number of consumer complaints, officials in the state attorney general's office say they are nearing an agreement with computer makers to eliminate advertising practices that allegedly confuse consumers about the size of computer screens. The controversy centers on the discrepancy that often exists between the stated size of a computer monitor and the actual viewing area.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When is a 15-inch computer monitor not a 15-inch computer monitor? Almost always, says Merced County District Atty. Gordon Spencer. And he's eager to take IBM, Apple, Compaq and 10 other computer companies to court over the issue. In a lawsuit filed Monday, Spencer accused the companies of inflating the advertised sizes of computer monitors by about 13% to 19%, on average. Some computer monitors measured by the county were as much as 33.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what promises to be the first major test of the Clinton Administration's much-touted "industrial policy," the Pentagon announced Friday that it will cover half the cost of a $100-million project to manufacture flat-panel display screens. AT&T Corp. and Xerox Corp., two of America's leading multinationals, and Standish Industries, a small Lake Mills, Wis.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1994 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Does it matter if it's made in America? The question has been debated for years, and now it is being asked again following the Defense Department's recent announcement that it will spend $580 million in the next five years to support U.S. development of flat-panel display screens. Flat-panel displays are the computer screens on electronic weapons, which are the wave of the future in warfare.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Jose on Friday beat out rivals in Michigan and Texas to become the permanent headquarters for a government-aided consortium seeking to develop the factory equipment to make flat-panel displays, a technology now dominated by Japan. Although capturing the five-person office of the U.S. Display Consortium--won with $500,000 in incentives--is nice enough, the big prize will be the actual manufacturing of the ultra-light, high-resolution screens.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Commerce Department's decision to lift a tariff on imported color computer screens represents good news and potential jobs to makers of portable computers, industry officials said Wednesday. The decision, announced late Monday, could have the biggest effect on Orange County's Toshiba America Information Systems Inc., which makes some of its portable computers in Irvine. AST Research Inc. and Advanced Logic Research Inc., also in Irvine, could benefit as well.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1993 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reversing previous government policies, the Clinton Administration is moving quickly to aid the small but growing number of U.S. companies making flat panel displays--the ultra-light, high-resolution screens that are as critical to America's high-tech future as the semiconductor and microprocessor before them. Earlier this week, the Commerce Department revoked the 63% import duty that had been in effect on high-end color displays since early 1991.
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