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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
The Walt Disney Co.'s recently acquired Lucasfilm Ltd. subsidiary announced on Wednesday that its video game unit will no longer develop games.  LucasArts, which was founded in 1982, is best known for a slew of "Star Wars" video games. Lucasfilm said in a statement that the company will now look to license its intellectual property rather than create video games in-house. "After evaluating our position in the games market, we've decided to shift LucasArts from an internal development to a licensing model, minimizing the company's risk while achieving a broader portfolio of quality 'Star Wars' games," Lucasfilm said in a statement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times Staff, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
The man who killed five people in Santa Monica in a shooting rampage had shown an interest in assault weapons as early as 2006, according to a teacher at his old high school. A veteran English teacher at Olympic High, Santa Monica's alternative school for students who have struggled in traditional programs, reported to the principal that John Zawahri, the solitary teen who regularly ditched class, was surfing the Internet for assault weapons. Alarmed, he sent Zawahri to the principal's office.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
The Walt Disney Co. is expected to begin layoffs in the coming weeks, with the cuts centering on the company's movie studio, a source with knowledge of the matter has confirmed. The cuts, first reported by trade publication Variety, are said to be the result of an internal corporate review. Layoffs are expected to affect the studio's marketing and home entertainment divisions, and possibly other areas, according to a source. Variety reported that the cuts would also be made in the production department.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
The Walt Disney Co. and Electronic Arts Inc. have inked a licensing deal that will see the video game developer make and publish new "Star Wars" games, the companies said Monday afternoon. Under the exclusive, multi-year agreement, Electronic Arts will develop titles for "all interactive platforms and the most popular game genres" related to "Star Wars. " Disney retains certain rights to develop games for mobile, social, tablet and online platforms, the companies said.  The announcement comes a little more than a month after Disney's Lucasfilm Ltd. subsidiary, which is responsible for the "Star Wars" franchise, said it would no longer make video games.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2004
* Microsoft Corp. promoted longtime industry executive Peter Moore to a job overseeing global game production and marketing and formally named Shane Kim to head its video game development studios.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Amazon.com Inc. launched Amazon Game Studios, its first major foray into video game development, along with "Living Classics," a social game for Facebook. The Seattle company announced the news Monday an email and on its website. "Amazon Game Studios is exactly what it sounds like: a new team at Amazon that's focused on creating innovative, fun and well-crafted games," the company said online . "Our first title, 'Living Classics,' is debuting on Facebook today. " Amazon did not give out much information about the new game studio, besides that it is hiring.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2007 | From Reuters
Walt Disney Co. will triple the amount of money it spends developing video games to benefit from strong growth prospects in the global market, the entertainment company's chief financial officer said Friday. "We are ramping up our investment in video games.... It is a market where there is real opportunity," Thomas O. Staggs said in London.
NEWS
November 24, 2005 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
WHEN high schoolers say they want to grow up and build video games, Steve Seabolt has a pat response: "You don't get to make video games by playing video games," says the vice president of university and marketing education at Electronic Arts, the world's No. 1 video game maker. "You make video games by studying really, really hard."
BUSINESS
October 20, 2008 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
The Thukrals wanted their son, Dhruv, to go into nanotechnology. So when he told them he'd rather be a video game developer he might as well have said he wanted to join the circus. "Are you serious?" they asked. He was. The 21-year-old USC graduate student proved it by switching the focus of his computer science doctorate from a field known as distributed systems to video game programming.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1994
Allen Adham, who co-founded Chaos Studios Inc. in Costa Mesa in 1991, sold the video game development business two weeks ago for $6.75 million. In an interview last week with Times staff writer Dean Takahashi, Adham told how he and co-founders Michael Morhaime and Frank Pearce got started and speculated about challenges that the video game industry faces. Q: How much did you get into video games? A: In my freshman year in high school, "Space Invaders" and "Asteroids" and "Defender" . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Walt Disney Co. has confirmed that it is laying off staff at its movie studio, which several media outlets reported last week. The Los Angeles Times reported  April 5 that the cuts were expected to affect the studio's marketing and home entertainment divisions and possibly other areas.  “As part of an ongoing review to ensure that the studios' operational structure and economics align with the demands of the current marketplace, we...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
The Walt Disney Co. is expected to begin layoffs in the coming weeks, with the cuts centering on the company's movie studio, a source with knowledge of the matter has confirmed. The cuts, first reported by trade publication Variety, are said to be the result of an internal corporate review. Layoffs are expected to affect the studio's marketing and home entertainment divisions, and possibly other areas, according to a source. Variety reported that the cuts would also be made in the production department.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
The Walt Disney Co.'s recently acquired Lucasfilm Ltd. subsidiary announced on Wednesday that its video game unit will no longer develop games.  LucasArts, which was founded in 1982, is best known for a slew of "Star Wars" video games. Lucasfilm said in a statement that the company will now look to license its intellectual property rather than create video games in-house. "After evaluating our position in the games market, we've decided to shift LucasArts from an internal development to a licensing model, minimizing the company's risk while achieving a broader portfolio of quality 'Star Wars' games," Lucasfilm said in a statement.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Lat Ware placed the NeuroSky headset on my 10-year-old son's head and then began making the adjustments. The device detects brain waves, and then digitizes them. Ware, 28, had to make sure the headset was picking up the right waves before the real fun could begin.  Once everything was set, Ware provided some simple rules. Look at the computer screen where he had just launched the demo version of his work-in-progress video game called, "Throw Trucks With Your Mind!" Concentrate on one object, in this case a kind of futuristic tank sitting in a large chamber.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Amazon.com Inc. launched Amazon Game Studios, its first major foray into video game development, along with "Living Classics," a social game for Facebook. The Seattle company announced the news Monday an email and on its website. "Amazon Game Studios is exactly what it sounds like: a new team at Amazon that's focused on creating innovative, fun and well-crafted games," the company said online . "Our first title, 'Living Classics,' is debuting on Facebook today. " Amazon did not give out much information about the new game studio, besides that it is hiring.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2009 | Alex Pham
Since landing his first job in the video game industry in 1992 as a salesman at Capcom Co., Justin Berenbaum never wanted for work -- until this month. The 39-year-old from Woodland Hills was laid off from his job as vice president of business development at EmSense Corp., a San Francisco game design consulting firm. A few days later, he was roaming the halls of the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, browsing the career pavilion and hitting up former colleagues for leads.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Hoping to spur interest among video game enthusiasts, creative types and students, Microsoft Corp. is expected to announce today that it plans to offer a consumer version of the professional software tools used to create video games for its Xbox 360 console. The XNA Game Studio Express program, an offshoot of the company's more robust XNA Framework, will be available Aug. 30 for a $99 annual subscription, the company said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2003 | Steve Harvey
So that teenager of yours wants to spend every waking (and semi-waking) minute playing video games? Relax! He's just doing his college preparatory work for USC. Yes, bro, the Daily Trojan reports that the university is working on a plan whereby students could minor in "video game development and production," making USC "what is believed to be the first major research university to do so."
BUSINESS
March 23, 2009 | Alex Pham
It's no coincidence that most of the blockbuster video games of the last two decades have been gorefests and war simulations. Their creators were single guys in their teens and 20s whose all-night coding sessions were fueled by Doritos and Mountain Dew. John Smedley was one of them. In the mid-1990s, he helped make the trailblazing online game EverQuest, a slash-'em-up fantasy world that only a Dungeons & Dragons-obsessed geek could love. But Smedley has grown up, and so has the industry.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2008 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
The Thukrals wanted their son, Dhruv, to go into nanotechnology. So when he told them he'd rather be a video game developer he might as well have said he wanted to join the circus. "Are you serious?" they asked. He was. The 21-year-old USC graduate student proved it by switching the focus of his computer science doctorate from a field known as distributed systems to video game programming.
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