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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1993
Video games should be rated, all right (Dec. 8). "S" for stupid, "E" for expensive and "B" for boring. KENNETH L. ZIMMERMAN Huntington Beach
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BUSINESS
December 14, 2008 | Alex Pham, Pham is a Times staff writer.
For some parents, Christmas and Hanukkah can be more terrifying than Halloween -- and not because of the in-laws. It's because many kids expect to receive good video games, and their parents are often clueless when it comes to a medium that scarcely existed when they were growing up. Game makers don't make it easy. They release hundreds of new titles, at $50 to $60 a pop, into the market ahead of the holidays, like bats exploding into the night sky.
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BUSINESS
October 23, 2005
Regarding "Debate Flares Anew Over Violence in Video Games," Oct. 5: If this weren't such an important issue, I would find it laughable that the Entertainment Software Ratings Board claims that its video game ratings are a reliable way for parents to protect their children from violent content. There are two fatal flaws -- not widely known but well known enough by those with a vested interest in the matter -- that make the current "on-pack" video game ratings system virtually worthless: First, the ratings board is an arm of the Entertainment Software Assn.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2005
Regarding "Debate Flares Anew Over Violence in Video Games," Oct. 5: If this weren't such an important issue, I would find it laughable that the Entertainment Software Ratings Board claims that its video game ratings are a reliable way for parents to protect their children from violent content. There are two fatal flaws -- not widely known but well known enough by those with a vested interest in the matter -- that make the current "on-pack" video game ratings system virtually worthless: First, the ratings board is an arm of the Entertainment Software Assn.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1999 | Jennifer Oldham
A 5-year-old watchdog group created to rate video games will announce next week that it is launching a public service campaign aimed at increasing awareness of its little-known ratings system. The campaign by the Entertainment Software Ratings Board follows close scrutiny of its ratings system earlier this year by lawmakers and parents when assailants in the Columbine High School massacre were reported to have played violent video games.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994 | Carroll Lachnit, Carroll Lachnit is a free-lance writer based in Long Beach.
When kids plead for the latest, hottest $60 video game, parents have to wonder: Just what mayhem might pop up at the punch of a button or the jerk of a joystick? Currently, parents can try to find out how violent or sexual a game is by looking at the package. But only Sega regularly rates titles for its systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1993 | Compiled for The Times by Rip Rense
Video games have been criticized as increasingly violent and gory. Teen-agers familiar with the games respond to the charge. BRIAN SCHWARTZ Senior, 18, Glendale High School, former top-ranked national Nintendo player One reason that Mortal Kombat is separate from the rest is that the people who fight in this game have actual actors portraying them. So they look very lifelike.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to head off federal intervention in their industry, the nation's largest video game makers Friday jointly introduced a rating system to warn consumers of graphic violence or explicit sexual content in their products. Industry officials said that parents trying to keep objectionable material out of their children's hands can expect to see games labeled with rating icons, which will explain whether certain video games are appropriate for different age groups.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Parents struggling to find appropriate video games for their "tweens" -- children approaching their teens -- will have a better measuring stick. The Entertainment Software Rating Board announced a new category of E10-plus to help fill a gap between games rated E for everyone, which some children outgrow, and T for teen, which are too violent or mature for some parents' tastes. The E10-plus rating means the video game may be suitable for children 10 and older.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Darren Chastin loves being thrust into the middle of chaos. When the 26-year-old software developer from New York is looking for a thrill, he reaches for the virtual killing sprees of "Postal" and "Carmageddon." Or there's "Grand Theft Auto," in which players earn points by--among other things--carjacking taxis, buying drugs and running down pedestrians. And as soon as the computer game "Kingpin: Life of Crime" hit the shelves in June, Chastin raced to buy it.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Parents struggling to find appropriate video games for their "tweens" -- children approaching their teens -- will have a better measuring stick. The Entertainment Software Rating Board announced a new category of E10-plus to help fill a gap between games rated E for everyone, which some children outgrow, and T for teen, which are too violent or mature for some parents' tastes. The E10-plus rating means the video game may be suitable for children 10 and older.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2004 | Richard Rainey, Times Staff Writer
A coalition of parent, church and women's groups released a list Tuesday of what they considered the 10 most violent video games, warning parents about the inadequacies of the industry to regulate sales to children and teens.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1999 | Jennifer Oldham
A 5-year-old watchdog group created to rate video games will announce next week that it is launching a public service campaign aimed at increasing awareness of its little-known ratings system. The campaign by the Entertainment Software Ratings Board follows close scrutiny of its ratings system earlier this year by lawmakers and parents when assailants in the Columbine High School massacre were reported to have played violent video games.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Darren Chastin loves being thrust into the middle of chaos. When the 26-year-old software developer from New York is looking for a thrill, he reaches for the virtual killing sprees of "Postal" and "Carmageddon." Or there's "Grand Theft Auto," in which players earn points by--among other things--carjacking taxis, buying drugs and running down pedestrians. And as soon as the computer game "Kingpin: Life of Crime" hit the shelves in June, Chastin raced to buy it.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the computer game world, gratuitous violence is an everyday commodity. But lust doesn't sell--at least not on the shelves at Costco Cos. Take Tribal Dreams' forthcoming release, "Of Light and Darkness--The Prophecy." The game, which features a digital likeness of actress Lolita Davidovich and the voice of actor James Woods, has a painting of a sexy, futuristic-looking angel on the cover of its box.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994 | Carroll Lachnit, Carroll Lachnit is a free-lance writer based in Long Beach.
When kids plead for the latest, hottest $60 video game, parents have to wonder: Just what mayhem might pop up at the punch of a button or the jerk of a joystick? Currently, parents can try to find out how violent or sexual a game is by looking at the package. But only Sega regularly rates titles for its systems.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Video Game Makers Will Use Movie-Type Ratings: The U.S. video game industry has tentatively decided that an anonymous panel of parents, psychologists and educators will rate computer games according to the violence and sex they contain, industry executives said. The panel would be appointed by a trade association that the $6-billion-a-year industry plans to set up. During the pre-Christmas rush of game releases, it would have perhaps 25 members.
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leading makers of video games, seeking to avoid government regulation of their burgeoning $6-billion industry, pledged Friday to develop an independent rating system before next Christmas season in order to warn buyers of violent or sexually explicit content not suitable for children. At the same time, officials of three retailers promised to keep unrated games off their stores' shelves and to help consumers understand how to use the classifications to select products appropriate for youngsters.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to head off federal intervention in their industry, the nation's largest video game makers Friday jointly introduced a rating system to warn consumers of graphic violence or explicit sexual content in their products. Industry officials said that parents trying to keep objectionable material out of their children's hands can expect to see games labeled with rating icons, which will explain whether certain video games are appropriate for different age groups.
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leading makers of video games, seeking to avoid government regulation of their burgeoning $6-billion industry, pledged Friday to develop an independent rating system before next Christmas season in order to warn buyers of violent or sexually explicit content not suitable for children. At the same time, officials of three retailers promised to keep unrated games off their stores' shelves and to help consumers understand how to use the classifications to select products appropriate for youngsters.
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