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BUSINESS
March 12, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
With just two days to go, Lat Ware reached his Kickstarter goal of raising $40,000 that will allow him to finish work on a video game played using brain waves.   "Sometimes dreams come true," Ware said in an e-mail.  PHOTOS: Tech we want to see in 2013 As of Monday night, his project, called "Throw Trucks With Your Mind," had raised $41,062 from 495 backers. Ware has said he plans to use the money to hire a handful of people to complete the game within the next year.  The game is played by wearing a NeuroSky headset that reads brain waves.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
The people behind the "Payday" video game franchise have a lot going on. They're making a movie based on "Payday: The Heist," the 2011 cult hit video game, for 2014. The game's sequel is coming out in August, and they're now working on the third installment. Plus there's a Web series. Video games as source material for films is not new. What's different about these projects is that the video game makers and the filmmakers are working together throughout the process. PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments Juggling all those projects means taking multiple angles on the same intellectual property and thinking in ways filmmakers typically haven't, said Greg O'Connor, producer of the upcoming "Payday: The Heist" film.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
While sales of new video game discs have been plummeting all year, it turns out gamers are spending their money to play in other ways. During the third quarter (from July through September), total spending on video games -- new and old, purchases and rentals, physical and digital -- totaled $1.07 billion in the U.S., according to research firm NPD Group. That's down only 1% from a year ago. Those figures are more heartening to the game industry than monthly figures for new physical game sales and consoles that are released by NPD. In total, spending on physical games dropped 16% during the third quarter, and spending on games on digital platforms jumped 22%. Video game publishers make no money from used game sales or rentals (besides the initial sales of those titles)
BUSINESS
October 13, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Now playing on YouTube: The melodious clash of the Ohio marching bands. In one corner we've got the Ohio University marching band -- "the most exciting band in the land" -- doing its interpretation of the viral phenomenon K-Pop song "Gangnam Style. " (The band members put the instruments down and go into a straight-up dance party at 1:27 into the video.) In the other corner we've got the Ohio State University marching band -- "the best damn band in the land" -- and its viral  smash hit  that takes viewers on an audio and visual tour of video games throughout history.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By August Brown
The rapper Future is known for his liberal use of Auto-Tune, but now he's got another charmingly low-rent bit of technology to share. The Atlanta rapper-singer has a great new single in "Move That Dope," which features guest turns from Pharrell Williams, Pusha T and Cameo. To accompany it, he posted an addictive new video game that's a slightly more menacing version of vintage Nintendo titles. " Move That Doh " (a more family-friendly version of the title) sports 8-bit graphics straight out of the '80s heyday of cocaine trafficking.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
It took a day for Ouya, an Android-based video game console, to meet its goal on Kickstarter. In fact, Ouya has already more than tripled the mark. The proposed project, which sought $950,000 in funding from Kickstarter , has more than $3 million halfway through its first day on the fundraising website and still has about a month left to collect more money. Ouya started a buzz Tuesday after the project was announced . The start-up company, which shares its name with its console, wants to bring the ease of developing video games from smartphones back to TVs by running on Android.
SPORTS
March 13, 2012 | By Mark Medina
In an effort perhaps to sharpen his recently poor putting, Tiger Woods appears to have contacted an unlikely source. Shaq Fu. A new commercial promoting Tiger Woods' PGA Tour 13 features Shaquille O'Neal and Woods mimicking classic kung fu films, including awkward voice dubbing and endless kung fu moves. Based on O'Neal's free-throw shooting history, it's likely the former Lakers center adopts Happy Gilmore's game: tremendous driving power and unreliable putting. So it's unclear if such an approach would actually help.
SPORTS
May 21, 2012
Writers from around the Tribune Co. discuss whether "Tebowing" - the practice of publicly taking a knee in prayer made popular by New York Jets backup quarterback Tim Tebow when he was starting for the Denver Broncos last season - deserves a place in the popular Madden NFL video game. Check back throughout the day for their responses and join the discussion by voting in the poll and leaving a comment of your own. Sam Farmer, Los Angeles Times Of course there's a place for Tebowing in Madden.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The Pacific Symphony performs music for an unlikely audience -- gamers battling the hellish underworlds of Diablo III. The symphony teamed up with Irvine-based game developer Blizzard Entertainment, known for the Warcraft and Starcraft franchises, for the long-awaited third installment in the Diablo series. More than 100 musicians recorded the score live last July in Costa Mesa's Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall under the baton of Eímear Noone. “It was important to give Diablo III its own sound - - not only via the compositions, but even in the manner in which it was recorded,” Blizzard Entertainment's audio director Russell Brower said in a news release about the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Ben Fritz
Long stuck in low gear, Walt Disney Co.'s video game division is aiming for infinity. The entertainment conglomerate on Tuesday unveiled plans for a high-stakes initiative called Disney Infinity that could determine the success or failure of its video game business over the next few years. Infinity will enable players to buy toys based on famous Disney characters like Mr. Incredible and "Pirates of the Caribbean's" Jack Sparrow and “scan” them into a game. Each character can have adventures in his or her own environment - like Sparrow on the high seas -- or together in a "playground" mode where players create new worlds.
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