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BUSINESS
July 19, 2003 | Jonathan Peterson and E. Scott Reckard, Times Staff Writers
The Securities and Exchange Commission is conducting an apparently broad investigation of accounting practices in the video game industry, according to SEC filings by three game publishers, including two in Southern California that produce some of the industry's most popular titles. Activision Inc. of Santa Monica, publisher of the popular "Tony Hawk's Pro Skater" games; Calabasas Hills-based THQ Inc., which publishes the "SpongeBob SquarePants" series; and Acclaim Entertainment Inc.
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BUSINESS
January 21, 2003 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
Kenji Suzuki, a 19-year-old restaurant worker, used to play video games five or six hours a day. Starting in elementary school, he developed a passion, acquired four different hardware systems -- PlayStation 2, Famicon, Super Famicon and Game Boy Advance -- and spent a small fortune on software titles. Now he's lucky if he plays an hour a week. A demanding job, a newfound interest in playing soccer -- the real kind -- and learning new songs on his guitar are all part of the change.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2002 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For video game companies, these are feast years. With hundreds of new titles this holiday, the industry is expecting record sales. But not everyone is benefiting from the boom. A number of firms--including Infogrames, 3DO Co., Acclaim Entertainment Inc., Irvine-based Interplay Entertainment Corp. and Midway Games Inc.--are pressured by debt, declining sales and mounting costs.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2002 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a page out of Hollywood's product-placement script, Electronic Arts Inc. has inked a deal with Intel Corp. and McDonald's Corp. to incorporate their products into its upcoming computer game, "The Sims Online." The multimillion-dollar deal is a milestone for the game industry, which traditionally has paid to use other companies' logos in their games. Sony Corp., for example, has paid tens of thousands of dollars to car manufacturers such as Honda Motor Co.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2001 | JEFF LEEDS and MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A long-awaited federal report on the marketing of violent entertainment to children is expected to criticize movie and video game retailers for selling mature-rated material to children and chastise the music industry for failing to heed federal officials' recommendations.
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Trade Commission offered chapter and verse against the recording industry Tuesday for failing to heed criticism that it markets violence to children. The report, a follow-up to its September study, largely credited the movie and video game industries for their efforts to stop targeting children as an audience for adult material.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A much-anticipated sequel to last year's scathing Federal Trade Commission report on the marketing of violent entertainment to children is expected to single out the recording industry for failing to respond to federal officials' recommendations. The film and video game industries are said to have shown some progress but have not completely ceased the marketing of inappropriate material to children, according to industry sources familiar with briefings given to congressional aides.
NEWS
September 11, 2000 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood has systematically marketed violent, adult-oriented films, music and video games to children, using popular cartoon shows, comic books and even young kids themselves to do it, according to a Federal Trade Commission report released today. Despite the entertainment industry's participation in warning label programs designed to shield children from violence in such products, the FTC found that advertising and other marketing tools were routinely used to attract young customers.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the computer gaming industry converges on Los Angeles for its annual trade fair, two Southern California game makers reported red ink Tuesday, caught by consumers' wait for the next generation of game consoles to be released. Santa Monica-based Activision, publisher of the popular "Tony Hawk's Pro Skater" video game, said Tuesday that it lost nearly $53 million in its fiscal fourth quarter ended March 31. That includes a charge of $70 million for a company restructuring.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Microsoft Corp., which will demonstrate its secret video game machine today in San Jose, is starting a separate games business unit and plans to spend more to promote its new entertainment device than it did to launch Windows 95. The machine, called the X-Box for now, is an all-in-one entertainment center that will let people play games, listen to music CDs, watch DVD movies and surf the Web, officials said Thursday. Designed to rival Sony Corp.'
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