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Video Teleconferencing

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BUSINESS
September 9, 1996 | ILAN GREENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Since AT&T Corp. unveiled its futuristic Picturephone at the 1963-64 New York World's Fair, the promise of video phones has been reminiscent of the old diplomatic joke about any developing country: It has a promising future. And it always will. Two-way video communication, long foreseen by engineers and marketers as the inevitable offspring of the telephone and television, has never really taken off.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997
Like any other class taking a field trip to the zoo, 20 elementary school students from the Norwalk-La Mirada school district gawked at the snakes and exotic insects they saw Tuesday. But instead of having to pack a lunch, cram onto a bus and tramp about the zoo, the students got to eat cafeteria pizza, relax inside an air-conditioned district headquarters and watch the animals live on video.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 1985 | PENNY PAGANO, Times Staff Writer
Last fall, after negotiating a new labor agreement with union employees, General Motors Corp. wanted to explain it to 3,500 senior managers across the country. Getting them all together was impractical, so the company linked up 31 GM training centers and 24 plants by satellite and discussed the new contract with its executives on television. A few years ago, when Boeing Co.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1996 | ILAN GREENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Since AT&T Corp. unveiled its futuristic Picturephone at the 1963-64 New York World's Fair, the promise of video phones has been reminiscent of the old diplomatic joke about any developing country: It has a promising future. And it always will. Two-way video communication, long foreseen by engineers and marketers as the inevitable offspring of the telephone and television, has never really taken off.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1994 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, Kinko's Service Corp. has been known as the photocopy place. Legions of college students have been weaned on the nationwide chain's 24-hour service, the salvation of many a last-minute term paper. But by the late 1980s, to keep up with new office equipment technology, Kinko's decided it had to join the information age.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1997
Like any other class taking a field trip to the zoo, 20 elementary school students from the Norwalk-La Mirada school district gawked at the snakes and exotic insects they saw Tuesday. But instead of having to pack a lunch, cram onto a bus and tramp about the zoo, the students got to eat cafeteria pizza, relax inside an air-conditioned district headquarters and watch the animals live on video.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1985
Compression Labs, San Jose, a manufacturer of full-motion color video teleconferencing systems, named Ken D. Schreder as vice president-research, development and engineering.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1997 | Dow Jones
Rainbow Technologies Inc. said its Mykotronx unit will acquire a line of communication encryption products from AlliedSignal Inc. Terms were not disclosed. Rainbow said Mykotronx will acquire all intellectual property and marketing rights to the KIV-7 line, and AlliedSignal will continue manufacturing the products for Mykotronx. KIV-7 devices protect communications between local areas, video teleconferencing, and other voice and data networks.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1999 | P.J. Huffstutter
Cox Business Services, the Aliso Viejo-based arm of Cox Communications Orange County that handles corporate clients, has won a five-year contract to build a high-speed, wide-area network for the city of Irvine. The deal, worth $473,080, allows Cox to use its cable infrastructure to link Irvine's Civic Center with 12 remote locations. These sites include the town's senior center, animal shelters and several parks.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1994 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, Kinko's Service Corp. has been known as the photocopy place. Legions of college students have been weaned on the nationwide chain's 24-hour service, the salvation of many a last-minute term paper. But by the late 1980s, to keep up with new office equipment technology, Kinko's decided it had to join the information age.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1985 | PENNY PAGANO, Times Staff Writer
Last fall, after negotiating a new labor agreement with union employees, General Motors Corp. wanted to explain it to 3,500 senior managers across the country. Getting them all together was impractical, so the company linked up 31 GM training centers and 24 plants by satellite and discussed the new contract with its executives on television. A few years ago, when Boeing Co.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL
NATO troops struggling with the internecine hostilities ripping up the former Republic of Yugoslavia have been keeping in touch via satellite equipment built and operated by Anaheim-based Interstate Electronics Corp.
NEWS
October 16, 1998 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Wye Plantation, a 1,100-acre retreat on Maryland's Eastern Shore formally known as the Wye River Conference Center, is an occasional backdrop for heads of state, policymakers, diplomats and scholars who want to conduct intense deliberations in a secluded locale without forgoing modern communications and conference facilities. In 1989, a North Atlantic Treaty Organization summit took place at the former plantation, and Israel and Syria held talks there in 1996.
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