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December 18, 1989 | From United Press International
Harold Lloyd Copyright Suit Filed: A trust set up by silent film star Harold C. Lloyd filed suit in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles Tuesday seeking to block the use of a picture of Lloyd on the cover of a videocassette catalogue. The suit charges that a firm called Video Yesteryear used a photograph of Lloyd without paying a fee to the Lloyd estate. The photo was from the film "Safety Last," in which Lloyd is shown clinging to the hands of a clock high above a street.
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BUSINESS
December 18, 1989 | From United Press International
Harold Lloyd Copyright Suit Filed: A trust set up by silent film star Harold C. Lloyd filed suit in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles Tuesday seeking to block the use of a picture of Lloyd on the cover of a videocassette catalogue. The suit charges that a firm called Video Yesteryear used a photograph of Lloyd without paying a fee to the Lloyd estate. The photo was from the film "Safety Last," in which Lloyd is shown clinging to the hands of a clock high above a street.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN
"Coming Attractions 1--The Super Stars." Video Yesteryear. $19.95. If you love the hyperbole and tease of movie previews, you'll be delighted by these 12 trailers, which bombard you with such claims as "His Greatest Ever!" and "The Show of the Century!" The touting here is on behalf of classic stars like Judy Garland (the preview for "Presenting Lily Mars"), Elvis Presley ("King Creole"), James Cagney ("Yankee Doodle Dandy") and Barbra Streisand ("Funny Girl").
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the '30s and '40s, when the Dick Tracy comic strip was at its peak, Tracy was also a B-movie hero, played by a real square-jawed actor, Ralph Byrd, who looked more like the famed crime stopper than Warren Beatty does. Beatty's lavish new "Dick Tracy," hyped by an extravagant publicity campaign, has revived interest in Tracy. Consequently, the old black-and-white movies, available on home video, are suddenly in demand.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1993 | DENNIS HUNT
Helen Hayes' few quality movies are available on home video, but some of them, such as "Arrowsmith" (1931, Nelson Entertainment), co-starring Ronald Colman, are tough to watch. Hayes, who died Wednesday, made her mark in films in the early 1930s, when the industry was still in transition from silents; production techniques were crude and the acting style was still characterized by excesses. Hayes' movies worth a look on video: "A Farewell to Arms" (1932, Video Yesteryear).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1990 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The small, but thriving home-video market for silent films is growing steadily. Major companies such as MGM/UA, HBO, CBS-Fox and Paramount continue to release them, upgrading a market that was once overrun by shoddy product. Silent films are for specialized tastes, appealing mostly to film buffs, historians and collectors. The silent-movie fan is generally older and sophisticated--attracted by the simplicity and the sense of history inherent in these movies.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | JOE SALTZMAN
It's another prime-time TV season. Despite all the new programming, you may find yourself running out of things to watch-so why not create the perfect TV nostalgia schedule? A cornucopia of programs many thought had vanished are now available on home viddo. Here's a suggested schedule, based roughly on when the shows originally aired. SUNDAY 7:30-8 p.m., "The Jack Benny Show" Benny, a radio superstar since 1932, moved easily into TV and his CBS programs are still hilarious.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the holidays in sight, you're probably wondering what to get the couch potato who already has a home video library of such classic TV series as "I Love Lucy," "The Beverly Hillbillies," "MASH," "The Honeymooners," "The Prisoner," "Dark Shadows" and "Bonanza." Look no further. Those familiar titles are just a start when it comes to shows available on video.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1998 | DON LIEBENSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Home video's first decade was defined by the industry-sponsored slogan, "Watch what you want, when you want." These days, however, video store shelves are dominated by the latest new releases. It's becoming harder and harder for the true film buff to--in the words of one chain's ad--go home happy. Securing a copy of "Good Will Hunting"? No problem. But documentaries, foreign films, vintage silent films, serials, B-movie obscurities or live TV recordings are much harder to find.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amour. Toujours l'amour. Friday is Valentine's Day, so romance is in the air--and on video. Here are a few perfect films for examining the affairs of the heart. William Powell and Myrna Loy may be best known as sophisticated sleuths Nick and Nora Charles in "The Thin Man" movie series. But they made several other films together, including the wacky comedy "I Love You Again" in 1940 (MGM/UA, $20). Powell plays a straight-arrow businessman about to be divorced by Loy.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After watching "Against the Wall," you may want to check out some of John Frankenheimer's best feature film and television work at the local video outlet. Two of his finest aren't yet on video, though can be caught on TV from time to time. Birdman of Alcatraz (MGM/UA): Wonderful 1962 drama chronicling the true story of Robert Stroud, who became a world-renowned authority on birds while serving time in Alcatraz.
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