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BUSINESS
August 8, 2002 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Media giant Vivendi Universal is pondering a sale of its profitable video-games business. Strapped for cash and burdened with $19 billion in debt, Vivendi Universal has been hashing out various scenarios for raising funds in recent weeks, including the sale of the games business, according to sources familiar with the discussions. The French company's new chairman, Jean-Rene Fourtou, also is weighing the sale of its Houghton Mifflin book publishing unit, which it purchased last year for $2.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007 | Heather Chaplin, Special to The Times
In 1998, when the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences hosted its first award show for videogames, it laid down a red carpet to add Hollywood glamour. Confused game makers, not knowing what it was for, carefully skirted it. Ten years later, they know what it's for, but they're still not sure they like it.
NEWS
May 29, 2002 | ROBERTO LOIEDERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fetching princesses threw fake cash in the air and Gothic Avengers waved plastic swords at miniskirted "booth babes" with purple hair. This neon-lighted boombox was Las Vegas with video games instead of slots, pulsating with sound and light. The enormously noisy, glitzy display of Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3), held last week at the L.A. Convention Center, was designed to overload the senses of both chain-store buyers and gamers looking for a new, totally immersive world to play in.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The agency best known for its hipper-than-hip ads for the "dancing" California raisins and Levi's 501 blues on Thursday won what may be the West Coast's coolest advertising client of all: Nintendo. Foote, Cone & Belding/San Francisco was handed the estimated $35-million annual advertising business for the Redmond, Wash.-based American subsidiary of the Japanese manufacturer and marketer of video games.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1994 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On movie screens this fall, Tom Cruise will compete with Robert De Niro. On television, Tim Allen and Kelsey Grammer are duking it out. In record stores, Pearl Jam will square off against Michael Jackson. And in the world of video games, look for the battle of Sonic the Hedgehog and Donkey Kong. The expected hit titles, Sega of America's Sonic & Knuckles (due in stores Tuesday) and Nintendo of America's Donkey Kong Country (due Nov.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2010 | By Alex Pham
Shares of Electronic Arts Inc. plunged more than 8% in after-hours trading Monday following the video game company's release of its third-quarter results and lowering of earnings projections as the game industry continues to struggle with the economic downturn. The Redwood City, Calif., publisher of Madden NFL, Mass Effect and the Sims titles posted a 25% revenue drop to $1.2 billion in the quarter that ended Dec. 31, down from $1.7 billion a year earlier. Its net loss for the quarter narrowed to $82 million, or 25 cents a share, compared with a $654-million loss, or $2 a share, a year earlier.
NEWS
November 24, 2005 | Pete Metzger, Times Staff Writer
6 genres of video games RPG: Role-playing games are incredibly popular online (where they are called massively multiplayer online role playing games; see story, Page 4). In essence, your character "learns" new traits and skills as you continue playing. An offshoot of the old Dungeons & Dragons fantasy games of the '70s, RPGs reward playing experience with more powers and skills for your character.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2008 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
PARK CITY, Utah -- As a young teen, Oren Peli was so frightened by "The Exorcist" that for years he couldn't watch any movie involving ghosts -- even "Ghostbusters." The 37-year-old Peli eventually outgrew his phantom phobia, and now the San Diego videogame designer has crafted his own film about things that go bump in the night.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2005 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
Sean Connery is reprising his 1963 performance as James Bond in "From Russia With Love." Marlon Brando, in one of his last performances, re-created his Oscar-winning Don Corleone role in 1972's "The Godfather." Al Pacino is lending his likeness to a new take on 1983's "Scarface." And Clint Eastwood is again recording dialogue from 1971's "Dirty Harry." These are not remakes of the originals but voice-overs for video games -- extensions of the movie franchises.
SPORTS
October 1, 1997 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While LaVale Woods awaited his chance to carry the football for USC this season, he always knew there was a place he could go to get it. At the controls of a football video game, Woods is master of his fate. No waiting for injuries. No awkward wishing that a teammate might fail. Just find No. 30 on a computer-simulated version of USC's team and hand himself the football. "I can take me and rush for 400 yards," said Woods, the self-professed Carl Lewis of video games.
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