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Videophones

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BUSINESS
November 24, 1992 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Judith Grant is clearly not a member of the MTV generation. But the 78-year-old resident of Rancho LaCosta in San Diego County relishes electronic gizmos. She's got a videocassette recorder. A compact disc player. A laser disc player. A telephone answering machine. A car phone. And as of three months ago, a videophone. Come again? That's videophone, as in a telephone with a tiny picture screen that shows the face of the person on the other end of the line.
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BUSINESS
December 4, 2005 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
Skype Technologies, the Luxemburg company famous for its free Internet telephone calls, last week launched an update that brings us closer to an elusive technological dream: the videophone. The Skype 2.0 software offers the ability to see as well as hear computer-to-computer callers -- provided that both parties have webcams. Video chats, as part of instant messaging services such as one sponsored by Yahoo Inc.
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BUSINESS
November 10, 1997 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER
Hoping to even out the workload, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Central District of California are installing a $150,000 videoconferencing system that links judges in Los Angeles, Santa Ana, Riverside, Santa Barbara and the San Fernando Valley. The goal is to make the legal process easier and more efficient for both the litigants and the judges hearing their cases, said Jon D. Ceretto, executive officer and clerk of the court for Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1999 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID
I remember hearing about videophones for the first time from my parents, who saw the concept demonstrated at the AT&T pavilion at the 1939 World's Fair. It was only a technology demonstration back then, but today it's real. By adding a small video camera, ranging from $79 to about $150, anyone with a PC and an Internet connection can place and receive videophone calls.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1993 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It didn't take long for Jerry Ganz to figure out how to get the most from his new $1,000 picture telephone: He bought seven more of the "see-and-say" gadgets and passed them out to his children and grandchildren. After all, the retired Marin County investor realized, what's the point of owning such a pricey phone if the people you talk with often don't have one too?
BUSINESS
January 27, 1997 | LARRY J. MAGID
Ever since the videophone was first demonstrated at the 1964 World's Fair in New York, communications companies have tried, without success, to convince people of the merits of having pictures accompany their telephone calls. Most people, and I count myself among them, just don't want to worry about how they look when they're on the phone. Of course, price and picture quality have always been obstacles too, and those barriers at least are starting to come down.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
The boys asked one another about school, teachers, what's in fashion and one another's favorite music--a typical conversation between high school students who have just met. This one, though, was unfolding over thousands of miles. At Kaos Network, a coffeehouse-style arts center in Leimert Park, seven African American teen-agers spent a morning querying their South African counterparts about everything from hairstyles to South Africa's shifting political landscape via videophone.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Santa Clara-based 3Com Corp. introduced its first low-cost consumer videophone, a $449 device designed and built by 8x8 Inc. The Bigpicture videophone works with a television and a touch-tone telephone and uses ordinary analog phone lines. It will compete with the $500 ViaTV unit introduced by Santa Clara-based 8x8 in February and the $650 C-Phone Home sold by Wilmington, N.C.-based C-Phone Corp.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1999 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID
I remember hearing about videophones for the first time from my parents, who saw the concept demonstrated at the AT&T pavilion at the 1939 World's Fair. It was only a technology demonstration back then, but today it's real. By adding a small video camera, ranging from $79 to about $150, anyone with a PC and an Internet connection can place and receive videophone calls.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1987 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
It has been 23 years since American Telephone & Telegraph first demonstrated a "picture phone" at the 1964 World's Fair in New York, and engineers ever since have been trying to devise an economical way for telephone callers to see the people they're talking with.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1997 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER
Hoping to even out the workload, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Central District of California are installing a $150,000 videoconferencing system that links judges in Los Angeles, Santa Ana, Riverside, Santa Barbara and the San Fernando Valley. The goal is to make the legal process easier and more efficient for both the litigants and the judges hearing their cases, said Jon D. Ceretto, executive officer and clerk of the court for Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Santa Clara-based 3Com Corp. introduced its first low-cost consumer videophone, a $449 device designed and built by 8x8 Inc. The Bigpicture videophone works with a television and a touch-tone telephone and uses ordinary analog phone lines. It will compete with the $500 ViaTV unit introduced by Santa Clara-based 8x8 in February and the $650 C-Phone Home sold by Wilmington, N.C.-based C-Phone Corp.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1997 | LARRY J. MAGID
Ever since the videophone was first demonstrated at the 1964 World's Fair in New York, communications companies have tried, without success, to convince people of the merits of having pictures accompany their telephone calls. Most people, and I count myself among them, just don't want to worry about how they look when they're on the phone. Of course, price and picture quality have always been obstacles too, and those barriers at least are starting to come down.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
The boys asked one another about school, teachers, what's in fashion and one another's favorite music--a typical conversation between high school students who have just met. This one, though, was unfolding over thousands of miles. At Kaos Network, a coffeehouse-style arts center in Leimert Park, seven African American teen-agers spent a morning querying their South African counterparts about everything from hairstyles to South Africa's shifting political landscape via videophone.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County video telephone promoter who continued soliciting investors after being jailed for contempt of court was indicted Wednesday on 30 counts of criminal fraud and money laundering.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County investor who put his life savings into Interlink Data Network of Los Angeles Inc. has sued the videophone company and its officers for alleged fraud and false advertising. Ronald C. Townsend of Santa Ana, a machinist who put $200,000 from his savings and an inheritance into an Interlink limited partnership, filed the lawsuit in Orange County Superior Court.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1987 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
It's been 23 years since AT&T first demonstrated a "picture phone" at the World's Fair in New York, and engineers ever since have been trying to devise an economical way for telephone callers to see the people they're talking with.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State securities regulators are investigating the operations of Interlink Data Network of Los Angeles Inc., an Orange County company that is raising millions of dollars to build a video telephone network in downtown Los Angeles. William McDonald, chief of enforcement for the state Department of Corporations, which regulates securities law, said Thursday that his agency is "concerned about the matter and is looking into it. I think it is a very serious matter.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State securities regulators have launched a formal investigation into the operations of Interlink Data Network of Los Angeles Inc., an Orange County company that is raising millions of dollars to build a video-phone network in downtown Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State securities regulators are investigating the operations of Interlink Data Network of Los Angeles Inc., an Orange County company that is raising millions of dollars to build a video telephone network in downtown Los Angeles. William McDonald, chief of enforcement for the state Department of Corporations, which regulates securities law, said Thursday that his agency is "concerned about the matter and is looking into it. I think it is a very serious matter.
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