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BUSINESS
March 18, 1986
The 2 1/2-year-old Viewtron computer videotext service will be shut down within weeks because it's not making a profit, the Knight-Ridder Newspapers announced. Viewtron was launched in October, 1983, and grew in the last six months to more than 20,000 subscribers from about 3,000, the company said. Viewtron employs 139 people, who will be laid off.
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NEWS
October 24, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the French phone company launched its futuristic "Minitel" system here a few years ago, it turned this Old World country into a nation of button-pushing Jetsons. Almost overnight, millions of French citizens had access to a simple little video display terminal distributed free by the government-owned utility, France Telecom.
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NEWS
September 12, 1986 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
A young man, in a new French pop tune, falls in love with a young lady through his videotext computer but cannot reach her anymore. "I am not receiving any more messages," sings Noe Willer in his song of modern technological woe. " . . . The stop-connection button is too cruel. To what network are you now plugged in?" The song, sad as it may sound, celebrates an extraordinary technological phenomenon in France.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, Times Staff Writer
In the heady days of the personal computer boom, pundits predicted that people would soon begin getting their news and other information on a screen rather than on a page. But it never happened. The problem is structural, replied the experts. If telephone companies were allowed into the electronic information business, then it would really take off as it has in France, they argued.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the French phone company launched its futuristic "Minitel" system here a few years ago, it turned this Old World country into a nation of button-pushing Jetsons. Almost overnight, millions of French citizens had access to a simple little video display terminal distributed free by the government-owned utility, France Telecom.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, Times Staff Writer
In the heady days of the personal computer boom, pundits predicted that people would soon begin getting their news and other information on a screen rather than on a page. But it never happened. The problem is structural, replied the experts. If telephone companies were allowed into the electronic information business, then it would really take off as it has in France, they argued.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1986 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
CBS, continuing a wave of cutbacks, said Friday that it is pulling out of a videotext venture formed almost three years ago with International Business Machines and Sears, Roebuck. IBM and Sears will continue as equal partners in the venture, called Trintex. The remaining partners said CBS' withdrawal would not delay the service, expected to be commercially available in the next two years.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Washington cleared the way Friday for American Telephone & Telegraph to move into electronic publishing, opening the door for a major new player to create and sell computer databases, videotext and other information services. U.S. District Judge Harold H. Greene dropped his 7-year-old ban, effective Aug. 24, that limited AT&T's role in the fast-emerging information services business to transmitting data for others.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1986 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
James Batten, president of Knight-Ridder Newspapers, was trying to tell investment analysts what his company learned from its failed experiment in videotext, the art of publishing news on video monitors rather than newsprint. Last month, having lost $50 million in 2 1/2 years, Knight-Ridder scrapped its videotext division after finding no market for it. "What did we learn?" Batten asked, about to answer his own question: "Sometimes pioneers get rewarded with arrows in the back."
BUSINESS
November 17, 1986 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
CBS, continuing a wave of cutbacks, said Friday that it is pulling out of a videotext venture formed almost three years ago with International Business Machines and Sears, Roebuck. IBM and Sears will continue as equal partners in the venture, called Trintex. The remaining partners said CBS' withdrawal would not delay the service, expected to be commercially available in the next two years.
NEWS
September 12, 1986 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
A young man, in a new French pop tune, falls in love with a young lady through his videotext computer but cannot reach her anymore. "I am not receiving any more messages," sings Noe Willer in his song of modern technological woe. " . . . The stop-connection button is too cruel. To what network are you now plugged in?" The song, sad as it may sound, celebrates an extraordinary technological phenomenon in France.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1986
The 2 1/2-year-old Viewtron computer videotext service will be shut down within weeks because it's not making a profit, the Knight-Ridder Newspapers announced. Viewtron was launched in October, 1983, and grew in the last six months to more than 20,000 subscribers from about 3,000, the company said. Viewtron employs 139 people, who will be laid off.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2002 | Tamra Santana, Bloomberg News
Bill collecting company Integretel Inc. agreed to give up $1.6 million it charged consumers for Internet-based adult entertainment services they never purchased, the Federal Trade Commission said Tuesday. The FTC said San Jose-based Integretel and its EBillit Inc. unit were involved in an illegal scheme in which customers were billed for adult "videotext" services through the international telephone billing system. Thousands of consumers were billed an average of $127 each.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1990 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL and JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
To a degree, the question about the fate of the American newspaper is this: Can the nation's newspaper companies, which basically provide local communities with mass information, survive by simply augmenting their once-grand business with such technologies as fax reports, telephone data services and videotext? Or is the communications industry headed the way of Time Inc.
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