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BUSINESS
December 16, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Western Water Co. agreed to buy Vidler Water Co. from Global Equity Corp. for $98.9 million in stock, which would create the largest water provider in the Western U.S. Western Water will issue 8.24 million shares of common stock, valued at $98.9 million based on Friday's closing price, to Toronto-based Global Equity, which will give the Canadian company a 50% stake. San Diego-based Western Water sells water from its land holdings and water reserves in California and Colorado.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Western Water Co. agreed to buy Vidler Water Co. from Global Equity Corp. for $98.9 million in stock, which would create the largest water provider in the Western U.S. Western Water will issue 8.24 million shares of common stock, valued at $98.9 million based on Friday's closing price, to Toronto-based Global Equity, which will give the Canadian company a 50% stake. San Diego-based Western Water sells water from its land holdings and water reserves in California and Colorado.
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NATIONAL
January 2, 2003 | Tom Gorman, Times Staff Writer
At first glance, there seems little about this sprawling desert burg to be coveted by neighboring communities. Its commercial center comprises a small post office, a video store and the Dust Devil pizza joint, with the J&J general store and Idle Spurs saloon down the road. There are a few upscale houses, but most of the area's 2,200 residents live in manufactured homes or trailers. Until a recent community cleanup, hundreds of abandoned or junked vehicles littered yards.
NEWS
August 10, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another sign of change roiling the water industry, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California appears ready to take the plunge into the free market as a buyer of water. Although it may be a long time before water stocks are as hot as Internet stocks or water futures are hawked with the fury of pork belly futures, Metropolitan is prepared to help hasten a "water market," with profits to be made by private sellers and water flowing to the highest bidder.
NEWS
July 25, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marc Reisner, who alerted authorities and environmentalists to the problems inherent in irrigating the American West in his landmark 1986 book "Cadillac Desert," has died at age 51. Reisner died Friday of colon cancer in his Marin County home. Environmentalist, conservationist, lecturer and writer, Reisner recently had become involved in two private companies dedicated to turning a profit--responsibly. One is the Sausalito-based Vidler Water Co.
NEWS
December 8, 2002 | Angie Wagner, Associated Press Writer
It's almost as if you need to get lost to get here, to dusty streets and aging trailer homes, to horses and ranches -- to an escape from somewhere else. Residents who managed to find this rural speck on the map are friendly but keep to themselves -- individualists, but a community all the same. "Please drive carefully. Old Horses. Blind dogs. Unruly kids," reads a sign on the way into town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2004 | Bettina Boxall and Julie Cart, Times Staff Writers
This was territory nobody wanted -- not homesteaders, not city dwellers, not even the railroads. It remained the big empty: a state-sized expanse of sagebrush, canyon lands and jagged mountains left almost entirely to the federal government. But now Nevada's Lincoln County, a 10,637-square-mile piece of the lonely Old West, might be headed for a bit of a New West boom. "Let us grow. Let us develop our water. Let us bring in some industry," pleads County Commissioner Tim Perkins.
NEWS
March 7, 2004 | Ken Ritter, Associated Press Writer
After nearly two decades of busily converting desert into sprawling metropolis in the fastest-growing region in the nation, southern Nevada finds itself beset by a four-year drought and straining against limits in the water that it can pump from nearby Lake Mead. Las Vegas is turning to rural counties to the north to quench a thirst that the nation's largest man-made reservoir can't sustain.
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