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February 9, 1993 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's how bad things used to be in Vidor: There was a persistent rumor 30-odd years ago that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was going to lead a march on the town because it was one of the meanest, toughest, most bigoted places known to man. Blacks dared not live here. The Ku Klux Klan embraced this place, which was once known as "Bloody Vidor." In these parts, Vidor (founded, incidentally, by the father of famed movie director King Vidor) became the symbol of everything a town shouldn't be.
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NEWS
January 14, 1994 | LIANNE HART and RAY DELGADO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal officials Thursday moved four black families into an all-white public housing complex in Vidor, Tex., that had been seized by the government when an earlier integration attempt failed. Police stood guard as three moving vans and at least three carloads of black motorists drove up to the 74-unit complex. Housing and Urban Development officials said four families--two single women with children, one single woman and one single man--moved into the complex before dawn.
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NEWS
January 14, 1994 | LIANNE HART and RAY DELGADO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal officials Thursday moved four black families into an all-white public housing complex in Vidor, Tex., that had been seized by the government when an earlier integration attempt failed. Police stood guard as three moving vans and at least three carloads of black motorists drove up to the 74-unit complex. Housing and Urban Development officials said four families--two single women with children, one single woman and one single man--moved into the complex before dawn.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's how bad things used to be in Vidor: There was a persistent rumor 30-odd years ago that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was going to lead a march on the town because it was one of the meanest, toughest, most bigoted places known to man. Blacks dared not live here. The Ku Klux Klan embraced this place, which was once known as "Bloody Vidor." In these parts, Vidor (founded, incidentally, by the father of famed movie director King Vidor) became the symbol of everything a town shouldn't be.
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