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Vieira De Mello

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WORLD
September 21, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Sergio Vieira de Mello, the new U.N. human rights chief, promised to act as the voice of the world's oppressed but implied that he would be less publicly outspoken than his predecessor. "My job will require speaking out to turn the world's attention to abuses," Vieira de Mello said. "But it also requires tact and political acumen, as well as the ability to roll up one's sleeves and get down to work to protect human rights away from the spotlights and the microphones."
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Brazilian diplomat Sergio Vieira de Mello died on Aug. 19, 2003, after a truck bomb exploded just outside his office at the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad, leaving him to spend his last hours buried headfirst in a pile of rubble and bitter irony. De Mello, a high-ranking U.N. diplomat and internationally known "fixer," had not wanted to be in Baghdad. He took the job as U.N. Secretary General to Iraq at the behest of world leaders including then- President George W. Bush with an eye to overseeing a speedy end to the U.S. occupation.
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WORLD
May 24, 2003 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
Secretary-General Kofi Annan on Friday named U.N. Human Rights Commissioner Sergio Vieira de Mello, a veteran troubleshooter, as the international organization's special representative to Iraq. The 55-year-old Brazilian-born diplomat was the choice of the Bush administration, which sought a high-profile United Nations official. Joining the United Nations in 1969, Vieira de Mello has served in such hot spots as Lebanon, Rwanda, Kosovo and East Timor.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
Samantha Power wears a lot of hats these days -- journalist, human rights activist, professor of "global leadership" at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, author and policy advisor. The latter role is of particular interest, since she spent 2005 and 2006 working in Sen. Barack Obama's office and still advises the Democratic presidential candidate on foreign policy issues. If there's an Obama administration, she's widely believed to be in line for a significant job.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
Samantha Power wears a lot of hats these days -- journalist, human rights activist, professor of "global leadership" at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, author and policy advisor. The latter role is of particular interest, since she spent 2005 and 2006 working in Sen. Barack Obama's office and still advises the Democratic presidential candidate on foreign policy issues. If there's an Obama administration, she's widely believed to be in line for a significant job.
WORLD
July 23, 2002 | WILLIAM ORME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A career U.N. diplomat from Brazil will be named the U.N. human rights chief today, replacing Mary Robinson, the outspoken former Irish president who rankled the United States with her persistent questioning of its counter-terrorism tactics and angered China and Russia by condemning their suppression of separatists. The nomination of Sergio Vieira de Mello, a 54-year-old Brazilian who has served in a succession of U.N.
WORLD
July 13, 2004 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Secretary-General Kofi Annan on Monday named Pakistan's ambassador to Washington to be the U.N. special representative to Iraq, the world body's first envoy there since it withdrew its staff in October. Ashraf Jehangir Qazi, 62, will fill the post last held by Sergio Vieira de Mello, who was killed in a bombing of the United Nations' Baghdad headquarters in August. Qazi will go to Baghdad with an initial staff of 20 to oversee U.N.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Brazilian diplomat Sergio Vieira de Mello died on Aug. 19, 2003, after a truck bomb exploded just outside his office at the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad, leaving him to spend his last hours buried headfirst in a pile of rubble and bitter irony. De Mello, a high-ranking U.N. diplomat and internationally known "fixer," had not wanted to be in Baghdad. He took the job as U.N. Secretary General to Iraq at the behest of world leaders including then- President George W. Bush with an eye to overseeing a speedy end to the U.S. occupation.
WORLD
May 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N.'s human rights chief accused the international community of turning a blind eye to mayhem and murder in Congo's civil war because it only had time for Iraq. "People are dying there by the hundreds.... But who is paying attention?" U.N. Commissioner for Human Rights Sergio Vieira de Mello said. Vieira de Mello said the only way to halt the bloodshed was with a strong international force. The 700 peacekeeping troops in the town of Bunia are not enough to intervene effectively, he said.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | Reuters
Negotiations on what to do with the Vietnamese boat people scattered around Asia have come to a stalemate, a U.N. official said Friday. "We are exactly at the same point--I must be perfectly frank with you--as in January," said Sergio Vieira de Mello, who has been coordinating the negotiations for the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. But High Commissioner Thorvald Stoltenberg has not given up hope and will continue to seek a solution, Vieira de Mello told a news conference.
WORLD
July 13, 2004 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Secretary-General Kofi Annan on Monday named Pakistan's ambassador to Washington to be the U.N. special representative to Iraq, the world body's first envoy there since it withdrew its staff in October. Ashraf Jehangir Qazi, 62, will fill the post last held by Sergio Vieira de Mello, who was killed in a bombing of the United Nations' Baghdad headquarters in August. Qazi will go to Baghdad with an initial staff of 20 to oversee U.N.
WORLD
May 24, 2003 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
Secretary-General Kofi Annan on Friday named U.N. Human Rights Commissioner Sergio Vieira de Mello, a veteran troubleshooter, as the international organization's special representative to Iraq. The 55-year-old Brazilian-born diplomat was the choice of the Bush administration, which sought a high-profile United Nations official. Joining the United Nations in 1969, Vieira de Mello has served in such hot spots as Lebanon, Rwanda, Kosovo and East Timor.
WORLD
September 21, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Sergio Vieira de Mello, the new U.N. human rights chief, promised to act as the voice of the world's oppressed but implied that he would be less publicly outspoken than his predecessor. "My job will require speaking out to turn the world's attention to abuses," Vieira de Mello said. "But it also requires tact and political acumen, as well as the ability to roll up one's sleeves and get down to work to protect human rights away from the spotlights and the microphones."
WORLD
July 23, 2002 | WILLIAM ORME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A career U.N. diplomat from Brazil will be named the U.N. human rights chief today, replacing Mary Robinson, the outspoken former Irish president who rankled the United States with her persistent questioning of its counter-terrorism tactics and angered China and Russia by condemning their suppression of separatists. The nomination of Sergio Vieira de Mello, a 54-year-old Brazilian who has served in a succession of U.N.
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
East Timor's U.N. administrator formally set Aug. 30 as the date for the territory's first free elections. Sergio Vieira de Mello signed a decree that sets into motion preparations for elections for a constituent assembly. That legislature will be given the task of drawing up a constitution ahead of full independence. Aug. 30 will be the second anniversary of a referendum in East Timor that resulted in it breaking free from Indonesian rule.
WORLD
August 24, 2003 | From Associated Press
Slain envoy Sergio Vieira de Mello will be remembered for easing suffering in trouble spots around the world, but his legacy could be the restoration of democracy in Iraq, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said Saturday. Vieira de Mello didn't finish his work, but his dying wish was for the United Nations to remain in Iraq, Annan said at the start of a 24-hour memorial wake in the envoy's native city.
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